418 Alemannia

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418 Alemannia
Discovery [1]
Discovered by M. Wolf
Discovery site Heidelberg Obs.
Discovery date 7 September 1896
Designations
MPC designation 418 Alemannia
Named after
Alemannia
(student fraternity)[2]
1896 CV
main-belt · (inner)[3]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 110.33 yr (40299 d)
Aphelion 2.9016 AU (434.07 Gm)
Perihelion 2.2831 AU (341.55 Gm)
2.5923 AU (387.80 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.11928
4.17 yr (1524.5 d)
232.59°
0° 14m 10.104s / day
Inclination 6.8178°
248.83°
126.72°
Earth MOID 1.29151 AU (193.207 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 2.57847 AU (385.734 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.399
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 34.10±4.6 km (IRAS: 17)[1][4]
40.12±0.62 km[5]
45.448±0.509 km[6]
32.98±1.04 km[7]
4.671 h (0.1946 d)[1][3]
5.82 h[8]
4.680±0.024 h[9]
4.6714±0.0001 h[10]
4.67±0.05 h[10]
4.6727±0.0003 h[10]
0.1878±0.062 (IRAS: 17)[1][4]
0.137±0.005[5]
0.1057±0.0158[6]
0.201±0.027[7]
B–V = 0.703
U–B = 0.225
Tholen = M[1]
M[3]
9.77[1]

418 Alemannia, provisional designation 1896 CV, is a metallic asteroid from the inner regions of the asteroid belt, about 34 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered by German astronomer Max Wolf at Heidelberg Observatory in southern Germany, on 7 September 1896.[11]

The M-type asteroid orbits the Sun at a distance of 2.3–2.9 AU once every 4 years and 2 months (1,526 days). Its orbit is tilted by 7 degrees to the plane of the ecliptic and shows an eccentricity of 0.12. Several photometric light-curve observations rendered a rotation period of 4.67 hours,[10] superseding previous observations that gave a period of 5.82 and 4.68 hours, respectively.[8][9]

According to the surveys carried out by the Infrared Astronomical Satellite IRAS, the Japanese Akari satellite, and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer with its subsequent NEOWISE mission, the body's albedo lies between 0.11 and 0.20, a typical value for moderately bright, metallic M-type asteroids.[4][5][6][7]

The minor planet was named after the student fraternity Alemannia in Heidelberg, Germany. It was named by German astronomer Adolf Berberich (1861–1920), after whom the asteroid 776 Berbericia is named.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 418 Alemannia (1896 CV)" (2015-06-09 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 10 May 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (418) Alemannia. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 49. ISBN 978-3-540-29925-7. Retrieved December 2015. 
  3. ^ a b c "LCDB Data for (418) Alemannia". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved December 2015. 
  4. ^ a b c Tedesco, E. F.; Noah, P. V.; Noah, M.; Price, S. D. (October 2004). "IRAS Minor Planet Survey V6.0". NASA Planetary Data System. Bibcode:2004PDSS...12.....T. Retrieved December 2015. 
  5. ^ a b c Usui, Fumihiko; Kuroda, Daisuke; Müller, Thomas G.; Hasegawa, Sunao; Ishiguro, Masateru; et al. (October 2011). "Asteroid Catalog Using Akari: AKARI/IRC Mid-Infrared Asteroid Survey". Publications of the Astronomical Society of Japan 63 (5): 1117–1138. Bibcode:2011PASJ...63.1117U. doi:10.1093/pasj/63.5.1117. Retrieved December 2015. 
  6. ^ a b c Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Hand, E.; Bauer, J.; et al. (November 2011). "NEOWISE Studies of Spectrophotometrically Classified Asteroids: Preliminary Results". The Astrophysical Journal 741 (2): 25. arXiv:1109.6407. Bibcode:2011ApJ...741...90M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/741/2/90. Retrieved December 2015. 
  7. ^ a b c Masiero, Joseph R.; Mainzer, A. K.; Grav, T.; Bauer, J. M.; Cutri, R. M.; et al. (November 2012). "Preliminary Analysis of WISE/NEOWISE 3-Band Cryogenic and Post-cryogenic Observations of Main Belt Asteroids". The Astrophysical Journal Letters 759 (1): 5. arXiv:1209.5794. Bibcode:2012ApJ...759L...8M. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/759/1/L8. Retrieved December 2015. 
  8. ^ a b Lagerkvist, C.-I.; Hahn, G.; Magnusson, P.; Rickman, H. (July 1987). "Physical studies of asteroids XVI - Photoelectric photometry of 17 asteroids". Astronomy and Astrophysics Supplement Series: 21–32. Bibcode:1987A&AS...70...21L. ISSN 0365-0138. Retrieved December 2015. 
  9. ^ a b Wetterer, C. J.; Saffo, C. R.; Majcen, S. (December 1999). "CCD Photometry of Asteroids at the US Air Force Academy Observatory During 1998". The Minor Planet Bulletin 26.: 30. Bibcode:1999MPBu...26...30W. Retrieved December 2015. 
  10. ^ a b c d Behrend, Raoul. "Asteroids and comets rotation curves – (418) Alemannia". Geneva Observatory. Retrieved December 2015. 
  11. ^ "418 Alemannia (1896 CV)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved December 2015. 

External links[edit]