British Columbia general election, 2017

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British Columbia General Election, 2017
British Columbia
← 2013 May 9, 2017 (2017-05-09) 42nd →

87 seats in the Legislative Assembly of British Columbia
44 seats were needed for a majority
Opinion polls
  First party Second party Third party
  Christy Clark 2014.jpg John Horgan 2015.jpg Dr Andrew J Weaver, 2014-05-14.jpg
Leader Christy Clark John Horgan Andrew Weaver
Party Liberal New Democratic Green
Leader since February 26, 2011 May 4, 2014 December 9, 2015
Leader's seat Kelowna West Langford-Juan de Fuca Oak Bay-Gordon Head
Last election 49 seats, 44.14% 34 seats, 39.71% 1 seat, 8.13%
Seats before 47 35 1
Seats won 43 41 3
Seat change Decrease4 Increase6 Increase2
Popular vote 796,672 795,106 332,387
Percentage 40.36% 40.28% 16.84%
Swing Decrease3.78pp Increase0.57pp Increase8.71pp

British Columbia General Election 2017 Map.svg
Popular vote by riding. Seat totals are determined by individual elections in each riding. Click the map for more details.

Premier before election

Christy Clark
Liberal

Resulting Premier

TBD

The 41st British Columbia general election was held May 9, 2017 to elect members of the Legislative Assembly to serve in the 41st Parliament of the Canadian province of British Columbia. It took place after the Premier of British Columbia formally advised the Lieutenant Governor to dissolve the Legislative Assembly.

The election was the first contested on a new electoral map completed in 2015, with the total number of constituencies increased from 85 to 87. New districts were added in Richmond and Surrey, while the boundaries to 48 existing electoral districts were adjusted.[1]

The preliminary results of the election on May 9 pointed to a minority parliament, with the Liberals winning in 43 seats - one less than the 44 required for a majority. The opposition NDP took 41, and the Greens doubled their share of the popular vote and won three seats.[2] This result was historic for several reasons: it marked the province's first non-majority legislature since 1952, the end of the Liberal majority government that had led the province since 2001, and the first election in Canada at the federal or provincial level that saw more than one Green elected.[3][4]

After May 9, it was not immediately clear what form the government would take, as Elections BC does not count absentee ballots until two weeks after election day. This final count would determine the makeup of the legislature, since several seats were won with margins of a few hundred votes or less, and both the Liberals and NDP hoped to flip enough seats to secure a majority.[5] However, no seats changed hands after the counting of absentee ballots concluded on May 24, and the initial count of 43-41-3 was confirmed.[6]

As no single party won a majority of seats, the Green Party, which held the balance of power, undertook negotiations with both the Liberal Party and NDP to determine whether a minority government or a coalition government could be established.[7] On May 29, NDP leader John Horgan and Green leader Andrew Weaver announced that the Greens would provide confidence and supply to an NDP minority government, a position which was endorsed the following day by the members of both caucuses.[8] In response, Liberal leader and incumbent premier Christy Clark indicated that she would have the legislature sit in the coming weeks and seek its confidence in a Liberal government, while acknowledging that she would likely be unsuccessful.[9]

Timing[edit]

Section 23 of British Columbia's Constitution Act provides that general elections occur on the second Tuesday in May of the fourth calendar year after the last election.[10] As an election was held on May 14, 2013, the subsequent election was conducted on May 9, 2017. The same section, though, makes the fixed election date subject to the Lieutenant Governor's right to dissolve the Legislative Assembly as he or she sees fit (in practice, on the advice of the Premier).[10]

The writ was dropped on April 11, 2017.[11] Advance voter registration ended April 11. Advance voting was from April 29 to April 30, then began again May 3 and lasts until May 6 before the general election on May 9.[12]

Background[edit]

In the 2013 general election, the BC Liberal Party under the leadership of Premier Christy Clark were re-elected with a majority government. The New Democratic Party, under the leadership of Adrian Dix, again formed the Official Opposition with a slightly reduced total of 34 seats. Despite the victory, Clark was defeated by NDP candidate David Eby in her riding but was elected in the Westside-Kelowna by-election following Ben Stewart's resignation in July 2013.[13] The Green Party, under the leadership of Jane Sterk, won its first seat in the legislature, though Sterk herself was not elected. Dix resigned as NDP leader following the election, and was succeeded by John Horgan.[14] On August 13, 2013 Sterk announced she would resign as Green Party leader,[15] Adam Olsen was appointed interim leader on August 25, 2013.[16] The Conservative Party, under the leadership of John Cummins, failed to win a seat and Cummins resigned after the Westside-Kelowna by-election. On February 2, 2016, two by-elections occurred in Vancouver-Mount Pleasant and Coquitlam-Burke Mountain to replace Jenny Kwan and Douglas Horne who had resigned to seek election in the 2015 federal election.

In preparation of the election, the Electoral Boundaries Commission Amendment Act, 2014 increased the number of electoral districts to 87 and required that the number of electoral districts in the North, Cariboo-Thompson, and the Columbia-Kootenay regions not be decreased despite lower population. The Electoral Districts Act was updated in November 2015 to establish the new electoral districts, adding one new electoral district in Surrey and one in Richmond.

The Election Amendment Act, 2015 requires the chief electoral officer to provide each party with a copy of the voters list, allows constituency associations to incur election expenses, limits vouching to amend voter information to only family members of the voter, and eliminates the 60-day pre-campaign period, including its expense limits.[17]

Election spending and fundraising[edit]

According to Elections BC, each candidate's campaign may spend a maximum of $77,674 over the 28 day election period and each political party, in addition, may spend $4,882,405. Also, each third party advertiser may spend up to $3,329 in a single electoral district and up to $166,445 overall.[18]

Unlike the Federal government or most provinces, British Columbia has no limits on political donations.[19][20] Wealthy individuals, corporations, unions and even foreigners are allowed to donate large amounts to political parties there.[21] On January 13, 2017, the New York Times published a story calling British Columbia the "Wild West" of Canadian political cash.[21] According to the New York Times, "critics of [Premier Clark] and her party, the conservative British Columbia Liberal Party, say the provincial government has been transformed into a lucrative business, dominated by special interests that trade donations for political favors, undermining Canada’s reputation for functional, consensus-driven democracy."[21] The article also explored Premier Clark's practice of taking an additional salary from the BC Liberals, beyond her Premier salary, financed by political contributions.[21] The Globe and Mail also followed up with a special investigation of "British Columbia: The ‘wild west’ of fundraising".[19] The investigation found that lobbyists are giving tens of thousands of dollars in their own name – and some power brokers are breaking one of the few rules the province has in place.[19] With no limits on political donations in B.C., the provincial Liberals raised $12.4 million last year – $4.5-million from individuals and $7.9-million from corporations.[19][22] On March 5, 2017, Elections BC announced it was launching a probe into Liberal Party fundraising.[23] The official opposition, the BC NDP, has promised to ban corporate and union donation if elected, as well as limits on individual donations, but continues to accept corporate and union donations at the present time.[22] The BC Green Party announced in September 2016 that it would no longer accept donations from corporations or unions.[24]

In terms of election spending, British Columbia currently has no spending limits ahead of the election period. During the 2009 election period, there was a spending limit of $4.4 million.[25] Spending limits for the 2017 election period were adjusted for changes to the consumer price index before being confirmed during the second week in April 2017.[26][18]

Opinion polls[edit]

Polling firm Last date of polling Link Lib. NDP Green Cons. Other Type of poll Sample size
Forum Research May 8, 2017 PDF 39 41 17 3 IVR 1,076
Insights West May 8, 2017 HTML 41 41 17 2 online 801
Justason Market Intelligence May 7, 2017 HTML 38 36 23 3 IVR/online 1,447
Mainstreet Research May 6, 2017 HTML 39 40 20 IVR 1,650
Ipsos Reid May 6, 2017 HTML 39 40 17 4 online/telephone 1,404
Angus Reid May 3, 2017 PDF 40 41 15 4 online 1,007
Justason Market Intelligence May 2, 2017 HTML 39 34 23 4 IVR/online 2,116
Mainstreet Research May 1, 2017 HTML 37 42 21 IVR 1,650
Innovative Research May 1, 2017 HTML 38 35 17 8 2 online 500
Ipsos Reid April 30, 2017 HTML 43 41 14 3 online 834
Innovative Research April 30, 2017 HTML 38 33 20 6 3 telephone 600
Forum Research April 29, 2017 PDF 29 37 24 7 3 IVR 1,067
Justason Market Intelligence April 28, 2017 HTML 38 37 21 4 online 1,127
Innovative Research April 23, 2017 HTML 42 32 16 9 1 online 1,000
Mainstreet Research April 22, 2017 HTML 34 44 22 IVR 1,650
Justason Market Intelligence April 20, 2017 HTML 36 39 19 5 online 1,128
Mainstreet Research April 14, 2017 HTML 37 39 21 3 IVR 1,650
Mainstreet Research April 10, 2017 HTML 35 39 19 7 IVR 5,506
Ipsos Reid April 9, 2017 HTML 39 44 12 4 1 online/telephone 1,388
Forum Research April 8, 2017 PDF 29 39 18 12 3 IVR 1,040
Insights West April 8, 2017 HTML 38 40 17 3 2 online 801
Mainstreet Research April 3, 2017 HTML 33 36 19 11 IVR 1,650
Mainstreet Research March 27, 2017 HTML 34 36 19 11 IVR 1,650
Mainstreet Research March 20, 2017 HTML 34 38 17 11 IVR 1,500
Mainstreet Research March 12, 2017 HTML 36 40 13 11 IVR 2,109
Mainstreet Research March 5, 2017 HTML 35 39 13 13 IVR 2,191
Forum Research March 1, 2017 PDF 32 36 15 14 3 IVR 1,056
Mainstreet Research February 26, 2017 HTML 33 38 15 13 IVR 2,352
Insights West February 26, 2017 HTML 40 41 11 5 3 online 801
Forum Research February 23, 2017 PDF 28 39 14 15 3 IVR 1,061
Mainstreet Research February 19, 2017 HTML 37 37 17 10 IVR 2,188
Insights West November 21, 2016 HTML 39 40 14 5 2 online 806
Mainstreet Research September 8, 2016 HTML 33 38 16 14 IVR 2,207
Innovative Research August 14, 2016 PDF 38 29 16 15 1 telephone 600
Ipsos Reid May 9, 2016 HTML 42 36 10 11 1 online 803
Insights West May 5, 2016 HTML 34 40 14 10 2 online 801
Insights West November 14, 2015 HTML 34 39 16 7 4 online 812
Insights West May 19, 2015 HTML 37 43 10 6 4 online 801
Ipsos Reid May 12, 2015 HTML 41 44 8 7 2 online 804
Insights West December 6, 2014 HTML 36 40 14 8 2 online 805
McAllister Opinion Research July 29, 2014 PDF 36.0 36.3 17.5 9.1 1.0 online 1,704
Insights West May 10, 2014 HTML 38 39 14 8 1 online 824
Justason Market Intelligence January 19, 2014 HTML 37 35 19 7 1 telephone/online 600
Insights West December 3, 2013 HTML 40 36 14 6 3 online 866
Election 2013 May 14, 2013 HTML 44.14 39.71 8.13 4.76 3.25 ballot 1,803,051

Endorsements[edit]

BC Liberals

  • Globe and Mail[27]

Retiring incumbents[edit]

Results[edit]

Summary of the 2017 British Columbia Legislative election
Party Leader[43] Candidates[44] Seat Votes[45] % Change (pp)
2013 Dissol.[n 1] 2017
Liberal Christy Clark 87 49 47 43 796,672 40.36 -3.78
New Democratic John Horgan 87 34 35 41 795,106 40.28 +0.57
Green Andrew Weaver 83 1 1 3 332,387 16.84 +8.71
  Independent 31 1 2 20,956 1.06 -1.30
Conservative vacant 10 10,402 0.53 -4.23
Libertarian Clayton Welwood 30 7,838 0.40 +0.29
Christian Heritage Rod Taylor (interim) 5 3,398 0.17 +0.12
  No Affiliation 2 1,151 0.06 -0.31
Your Political Party James Filippelli 10 1,137 0.06 +0.03
Social Credit vacant 2 896 0.05 +0.03
Communist Timothy Gidora 6 802 0.04 +0.02
Vancouver Island Party Robin Richardson 4 N/A 646 0.03 N/A
Land Air Water Mervyn Ritchie 1 N/A 580 0.03 N/A
BC First Salvatore Vetro[n 2] 1 543 0.03 -0.04
Refederation vacant 3 N/A 463 0.02 N/A
New Republican Wei Chen 1 N/A 318 0.02 N/A
Cascadia Troy Gibbons 2 N/A 248 0.01 N/A
Action vacant 2 N/A 205 0.01 N/A
Citizens First Phillip Ryan 1 N/A 90 0.00 N/A
4BC Erik Deutscher 1 N/A 58 0.00 N/A
Total 369 85 85 87 1,973,914

Results by riding[edit]

  • Names in bold are outgoing cabinet ministers, and names in italics are party leaders. The premier is in both.
  • † denotes incumbent MLAs who did not seek re-election.
  • ‡ denotes incumbent MLAs who sought re-election in a different riding.
  • A riding name in brackets below the name of the incumbent MLA indicates the name of the predecessor riding contested in the last election.
  • Candidate names are given as they appeared on the ballot, and may include formal names and middle names that the candidate does not use in day-to-day political life. For example, Greg Kyllo appeared on the ballot as Gregory James Kyllo.

Northern British Columbia[edit]

Electoral District Candidates   Incumbent
  Liberal   NDP   Green Other
Nechako Lakes John Rustad
5,307 - 54.39%
Anne Marie Sam
2,909 - 29.81%
Douglas Norman Gook
878 - 9.00%
Jon Rempel (Ltn.)
438 - 4.49%
Al Trampuh (Ind.)
226 - 2.32%
John Rustad
North Coast Herb Pond
3,079 - 33.66%
Jennifer Rice
5,243 - 57.31%
Hondo Arendt
826 - 9.03%
Jennifer Rice
Peace River North Dan Davies
9,707 - 66.31%
Rob Dempsey
973 - 6.65%
Bob Fedderly (Ind.)
2,799 - 19.12%
Rob Fraser (Ind.)
884 - 6.04%
Jeff Richert (Ind.)
275 - 1.88%
Pat Pimm
Peace River South Mike Bernier
6,634 - 75.94%
Stephanie Goudie
2,102 - 24.06%
Mike Bernier
Prince George-Mackenzie Mike Morris
10,725 - 57.12%
Bobby Deepak
5,942 - 31.65%
Hilary Crowley
2,109 - 11.23%
Mike Morris
Prince George-Valemount Shirley Bond
11,189 - 58.20%
Natalie Fletcher
5,683 - 29.56%
Nan Kendy
2,353 - 12.24%
Shirley Bond
Skeena Ellis Ross
6,772 - 52.23%
Bruce Alan Bidgood
5,613 - 43.29%
Merv Ritchie (LAW)
580 - 4.47%
Robin Austin
Stikine Wanda Good
3,531 - 38.75%
Doug Donaldson
4,748 - 52.10%
Rod Taylor (CHP)
834 - 9.15%
Doug Donaldson

Kootenays[edit]

Electoral District Candidates   Incumbent
  Liberal   NDP   Green Other
Columbia River-Revelstoke Doug Clovechok
6,620 - 45.44%
Gerry Taft
5,248 - 36.02%
Samson Boyer
1,708 - 11.72%
Duncan Boyd MacLeod (Ind.)
469 - 3.22%
Justin James Hooles (Ind.)
371 - 2.55%
Rylan Kashuba (Ltn.)
154 - 1.06%
Norm Macdonald
Kootenay East Tom Glenn Shypitka
9,666 - 56.57%
Randal Macnair
5,069 - 29.67%
Yvonne Marie Prest
1,926 - 11.27%
Keith D. Komar (Ltn.)
425 - 2.49%
Bill Bennett
Kootenay West Jim Postnikoff
4,547 - 24.33%
Katrine Conroy
11,164 - 59.74%
Sam Troy
2,976 - 15.93%
Katrine Conroy
Nelson-Creston Tanya Rae Wall
5,087 - 27.93%
Michelle Mungall
7,685 - 42.19%
Kim Charlesworth
5,130 - 28.16%
Jesse O'Leary (Ind.)
164 - 0.90%
Tom Prior (Ind.)
149 - 0.82%
Michelle Mungall

Okanagan, Shuswap and Boundary[edit]

Electoral District Candidates   Incumbent
  Liberal   NDP   Green Other
Boundary-Similkameen Linda Margaret Larson
9,513 - 42.80%
Colleen Ross
7,275 - 32.73%
Vonnie Lavers
2,274 - 10.23%
Peter Entwistle (Ind.)
3,165 - 14.24%
Linda Larson
Kelowna-Lake Country Norm Letnick
15,286 - 59.75%
Erik Olesen
5,345 - 20.89%
Alison Shaw
4,951 - 19.35%
Norm Letnick
Kelowna-Mission Steve Thomson
15,399 - 57.18%
Harwinder Kaur Sandhu
5,720 - 21.24%
Rainer Wilkins
3,836 - 14.24%
Charles Hardy (Cons.)
1,976 - 7.34%
Steve Thomson
Kelowna West Christy Clark
15,674 - 59.05%
Shelley Cook
6,672 - 25.14%
Robert Mellalieu
3,628 - 13.67%
Brian Thiesen (Ind.)
570 - 2.15%
Christy Clark
Penticton Dan Ashton
14,470 - 52.80%
Tarik Sayeed
7,874 - 28.73%
Connie Sahlmark
5,061 - 18.47%
Dan Ashton
Shuswap Gregory James Kyllo
14,829 - 55.80%
Sylvia Jean Lindgren
7,161 - 26.95%
Kevin Babcock
4,175 - 15.71%
Kyle McCormack (Ltn.)
410 - 1.54%
Greg Kyllo
Vernon-Monashee Eric Bailey Foster
13,625 - 47.87%
Barry Charles Dorval
8,355 - 29.36%
Keli Westgate
6,139 - 21.57%
Don Jefcoat (Ltn.)
341 - 1.20%
Eric Foster

Thompson and Cariboo[edit]

Electoral District Candidates   Incumbent
  Liberal   NDP   Green Other
Cariboo-Chilcotin Donna Barnett
8,520 - 58.78%
Sally Watson
3,801 - 26.22%
Rita Helen Giesbrecht
2,174 - 15.00%
Donna Barnett
Cariboo North Coralee Ella Oakes
6,359 - 51.06%
Scott Elliott
4,430 - 35.57%
Richard Edward Jaques
919 - 7.38%
Tony Goulet (Cons.)
747 - 6.00%
Coralee Oakes
Fraser-Nicola Jackie L. Tegart
6,597 - 41.97%
Harry Lali
6,005 - 38.21%
Arthur Alexander Green
2,517 - 16.01%
Michael Henshall (Social Credit)
598 - 3.80%
Jackie Tegart
Kamloops-North Thompson Peter Gordon Milobar
12,001 - 48.32%
Barb Nederpel
7,538 - 30.35%
Dan Hines
5,111 - 20.58%
Peter Paul Kerek (Comm.)
187 - 0.75%
Terry Lake
Kamloops-South Thompson Todd Graham Stone
15,465 - 55.78%
Nancy Bepple
6,072 - 21.90%
Donovan Cavers
5,785 - 20.86%
Jessica Lea Bradshaw (Ltn.)
295 - 1.06%
Beat Klossner (Comm.)
109 - 0.39%
Todd Stone

Fraser Valley[edit]

Electoral District Candidates   Incumbent
  Liberal   NDP   Green Other
Abbotsford-Mission Simon John Gibson
12,879 - 51.19%
Andrew Murray Christie
7,339 - 29.17%
Jennifer Holmes
4,298 - 17.08%
Dan Cameron (CHP)
644 - 2.56%
Simon Gibson
Abbotsford South Darryl Plecas
11,673 - 52.46%
Jasleen Arora
6,297 - 28.30%
William Aird Flavelle
3,338 - 15.00%
Ron Gray (CHP)
942 - 4.23%
Darryl Plecas
Abbotsford West Michael de Jong
11,618 - 55.23%
Preet Rai
6,474 - 30.77%
Kevin Allan Eastwood
2,280 - 10.84%
Lynn Simcox (CHP)
516 - 2.45%
Dave Sharkey (Ltn.)
149 - 0.71%
Mike de Jong
Chilliwack John Martin
9,180 - 48.15%
Tracey Lorrean O'Hara
6,207 - 32.56%
Wayne Froese
3,277 - 17.19%
Ryan McKinnon (Ind.)
402 - 2.11%
John Martin
Chilliwack-Kent Laurie Throness
11,814 - 52.75%
Patti MacAhonic
7,273 - 32.40%
Josie Bleuer
3,335 - 14.86%
Laurie Throness
(Chilliwack-Hope)
Langley Mary Polak
10,755 - 44.40%
Gail Chaddock-Costello
8,384 - 34.61%
Elizabeth Helen Walker
3,699 - 15.27%
Justin Greenwood (Cons.)
1,221 - 5.04%
Robert Kerr Pobran (Ltn.)
166 - 0.69%
Mary Polak
Langley East Rich Coleman
16,348 - 53.45%
Inder Johal
8,820 - 28.84%
Bill Masse
4,968 - 16.24%
Alex Joehl (Ltn.)
448 - 1.46%
Rich Coleman
(Fort Langley-Aldergrove)
Maple Ridge-Mission Marc Dalton
10,663 - 40.70%
Bob D'Eith
10,988 - 41.94%
Peter Pak Chiu Tam
3,467 - 13.23%
Trevor Hamilton (Cons.)
934 - 3.57%
Jeff Monds (Ltn.)
145 - 0.55%
Marc Dalton
Maple Ridge-Pitt Meadows Doug Bing
10,428 - 38.79%
Lisa Marie Beare
12,045 - 44.80%
Alex Pope
3,329 - 12.38%
Gary John O'Driscoll (Cons.)
676 - 2.51%
Steve Ranta (Ind.)
408 - 1.52%
Doug Bing

Surrey[edit]

Electoral District Candidates   Incumbent
  Liberal   NDP   Green Other
Surrey-Cloverdale Marvin Hunt
11,918 - 47.57%
Rebecca Smith
9,763 - 38.97%
Aleksandra Muniak
3,091 - 12.34%
Peter Poelstra (Ltn.)
279 - 1.11%
Stephanie Cadieux
Surrey-Fleetwood Peter Fassbender
7,413 - 35.83%
Jagrup Brar
11,085 - 53.58%
Tim Binnema
2,190 - 10.59%
Peter Fassbender
Surrey-Green Timbers Brenda Joy Locke
5,056 - 32.95%
Rachna Singh
8,945 - 58.29%
Saira Aujla
1,112 - 7.25%
Vikram Bajwa (NA)
163 - 1.06%
Kanwaljit Singh Moti (YPP)
69 - 0.45%
Sue Hammell
Surrey-Guildford Amrik Virk
7,015 - 37.76%
Garry Begg
9,262 - 49.85%
Jodi Murphy
1,840 - 9.90%
Kevin Pielak (CHP)
462 - 2.49%
Amrik Virk (Surrey-Tynehead)
Surrey-Newton Gurminder Singh Parihar
5,100 - 29.99%
Harry Bains
9,744 - 57.31%
Richard Krieger
1,171 - 6.89%
Balpreet Singh Bal (NA)
988 - 5.81%
Harry Bains
Surrey-Panorama Puneet Sandhar
10,064 - 41.86%
Jinny Sims
12,226 - 50.85%
Veronica Laurel Greer
1,620 - 6.74%
Liz Galenzoski (Refed)
132 - 0.55%
Marvin Hunt
Surrey South Stephanie Cadieux
13,509 - 50.94%
Jonathan Silveira
8,718 - 32.87%
Pascal Tremblay
3,141 - 11.84%
Peter Njenga (Ind.)
634 - 2.39%
Josh Barrett (Ltn.)
311 - 1.17%
Gary Hee (Ind.)
140 - 0.53%
Fabiola Cecilia Palomino (YPP)
67 - 0.25%
new district
Surrey-Whalley Sargy Chima
5,293 - 30.08%
Bruce Ralston
10,315 - 58.62%
Rita Anne Fromholt
1,893 - 10.76%
George Gidora (Comm.)
96 - 0.55%
Bruce Ralston
Surrey-White Rock Tracy Redies
14,101 - 49.87%
Niovi Patsicakis
8,648 - 30.59%
Bill Marshall
4,574 - 16.18%
Tom Bryant (Ind.)
950 - 3.36%
Gordon Hogg

Richmond and Delta[edit]

Electoral District Candidates   Incumbent
  Liberal   NDP   Green Other
Delta North Scott Hamilton
9,319 - 39.69%
Ravi Kahlon
11,465 - 48.83%
Jacquie Miller
2,697 - 11.49%
Scott Hamilton
Delta South Ian Paton
11,123 - 44.10%
Bruce Reid
5,228 - 20.73%
Larry Colero
2,349 - 9.31%
Nicholas Wong (Ind.)
6,437 - 25.52%
Errol Edmund Sherley (Action)
88 - 0.35%
Vicki Huntington
Richmond North Centre Teresa Wat
7,916 - 52.48%
Lyren Chiu
5,135 - 34.04%
Ryan Kemp Marciniw
1,579 - 10.47%
Dong Pan (Ind.)
336 - 2.23%
John Crocock (Action)
117 - 0.78%
Teresa Wat
(Richmond Centre)
Richmond-Queensborough Jas Johal
8,218 - 41.43%
Aman Singh
8,084 - 40.75%
Michael Wolfe
2,524 - 12.72%
Kay Khilvinder Hale (Cons.)
694 - 3.50%
Lawrence Chen (New Rep.)
318 - 1.60%
Linda Reid‡
(Richmond East)
Richmond South Centre Linda Reid
6,914 - 48.89%
Chak Au
5,666 - 40.07%
Greg Powell
1,561 - 11.04%
new district
Richmond-Steveston John Yap
10,332 - 47.60%
Kelly Greene
8,524 - 39.35%
Roy Sakata
2,833 - 13.05%
John Yap

Vancouver's eastern suburbs[edit]

Electoral District Candidates   Incumbent
  Liberal   NDP   Green Other
Burnaby-Deer Lake Karen Xiao Bao Wang
6,491 - 35.54%
Anne Kang
8,747 - 47.89%
Rick McGowan
2,209 - 12.09%
Graham Bowers (Cons.)
589 - 3.22%
Elias Ishak (Ind.)
229 - 1.25%
Kathy Corrigan
Burnaby-Edmonds Garrison Duke
6,404 - 32.09%
Raj Chouhan
10,827 - 54.25%
Valentine Wu
2,728 - 13.67%
Raj Chouhan
Burnaby-Lougheed Steve Darling
8,391 - 36.91%
Katrina Chen
10,911 - 48.06%
Joe Keithley
3,127 - 13.77%
Sylvia Gung (Ind.)
145 - 0.64%
Neeraj Murarka (Ltn.)
129 - 0.57%
Jane Shin
Burnaby North Richard T. Lee
9,290 - 39.42%
Janet Routledge
11,447 - 48.57%
Peter Hallschmid
2,830 - 12.01%
Richard T. Lee
Coquitlam-Burke Mountain Joan Isaacs
10,388 - 44.28%
Jodie Wickens
10,301 - 43.91%
Ian Donnelly Soutar
2,771 - 11.81%
Jodie Wickens
Coquitlam-Maillardville Steve Kim
8,519 - 37.70%
Selina Mae Robinson
11,438 - 50.61%
Nicola Eyton Spurling
2,467 - 10.92%
Jesse Velay-Vitow (Ltn.)
175 - 0.77%
Selina Robinson
New Westminster Lorraine Brett
5,870 - 21.20%
Judy Darcy
14,377 - 51.93%
Jonina Campbell
6,939 - 25.07%
James Crosty (Social Credit)
298 - 1.08%
Rex Brocki (Ltn.)
199 - 0.72%
Judy Darcy
Port Coquitlam Susan Chambers
7,582 - 30.05%
Mike Farnworth
14,079 - 55.79%
Jason Hanley
3,237 - 12.83%
Lewis Clarke Dahlby (Ltn.)
248 - 0.98%
Billy Gibbons (Cascadia)
88 - 0.35%
Mike Farnworth
Port Moody-Coquitlam Linda Reimer
9,910 - 40.20%
Rick Glumac
11,754 - 47.69%
Don Barthel
2,985 - 12.11%
Linda Reimer

Vancouver[edit]

Electoral District Candidates   Incumbent
  Liberal   NDP   Green Other
Vancouver-Fairview Gabe Garfinkel
9,436 - 31.85%
George Heyman
16,035 - 54.12%
Louise Boutin
4,007 - 13.52%
Joey Doyle (YPP)
149 - 0.50%
George Heyman
Vancouver-False Creek Sam Sullivan
10,370 - 42.16%
Morgane Oger
9,955 - 40.47%
Bradley Darren Shende
3,880 - 15.77%
Liz Jaluague (Ltn.)
213 - 0.87%
James Filippelli (YPP)
91 - 0.37%
Phillip James Ryan (Citizens First)
90 - 0.37%
Sam Sullivan
Vancouver-Fraserview Suzanne Anton
9,985 - 42.22%
George Chow
11,487 - 48.57%
Eric Kolotyluk
1,826 - 7.72%
Hiroshi Hyde (Ltn.)
179 - 0.76%
Harpreet S. Bajwa (YPP)
174 - 0.74%
Suzanne Anton
Vancouver-Hastings Jane Spitz
5,160 - 21.56%
Shane Lee Simpson
14,351 - 59.96%
David H.T. Wong
4,222 - 17.64%
Kimball Mark Cariou (Comm.)
203 - 0.85%
Shane Simpson
Vancouver-Kensington Kim Jee Chan Logan
7,236 - 32.16%
Mable Elmore
12,504 - 55.57%
Simon Alexander Rear
2,580 - 11.47%
Ramanjit Kaur Dhillon (YPP)
181 - 0.80%
Mable Elmore
Vancouver-Kingsway Trang Nguyen
5,377 - 27.09%
Adrian Dix
12,031 - 60.62%
Ellisa Calder
1,848 - 9.31%
Charles Bae (Cons.)
504 - 2.54%
Brette Mullins (YPP)
85 - 0.43%
Adrian Dix
Vancouver-Langara Michael Lee
10,047 - 47.46%
James Wang
8,057 - 38.06%
Janet Rhoda Fraser
2,894 - 13.67%
Surinder Singh Trehan (YPP)
172 - 0.81%
Moira Stilwell
Vancouver-Mount Pleasant Conny Lin
3,917 - 16.03%
Melanie Mark
15,962 - 65.31%
Jerry Kroll
4,136 - 16.92%
Mike Hansen (Ind.)
212 - 0.87%
Peter Marcus (Comm.)
142 - 0.58%
Shai Joseph Mor (YPP)
72 - 0.29%
Melanie Mark
Vancouver-Point Grey James Lombardi
8,414 - 33.16%
David Robert Patrick Eby
14,195 - 55.94%
Amanda Konkin
2,604 - 10.26%
Brian Taylor (Ind.)
84 - 0.33%
David Stall (YPP)
77 - 0.30%
David Eby
Vancouver-Quilchena Andrew Wilkinson
12,464 - 55.96%
Madeline Lalonde
6,244 - 28.03%
Michael Barkusky
3,301 - 14.82%
William Morrison (Ltn.)
265 - 1.19%
Andrew Wilkinson
Vancouver-West End Nigel Elliott
5,064 - 23.01%
Spencer Chandra Herbert
13,420 - 60.97%
James Marshall
3,059 - 13.90%
John Clarke (Ltn.)
352 - 1.60%
Leon David Dunn (Ind.)
116 - 0.53%
Spencer Chandra Herbert

North Shore and Sunshine Coast[edit]

Electoral District Candidates   Incumbent
  Liberal   NDP   Green Other
North Vancouver-Lonsdale Naomi Yamamoto
10,373 - 38.14%
Bowinn Ma
12,361 - 45.45%
Richard Warrington
4,148 - 15.25%
Donald N.S. Wilson (Ltn.)
316 - 1.16%
Naomi Yamamoto
North Vancouver-Seymour Jane Ann Thornthwaite
13,194 - 46.36%
Michael Rene Charrois
9,808 - 34.47%
Joshua Johnson
5,208 - 18.30%
Clayton Welwood (Ltn.)
247 - 0.87%
Jane Thornthwaite
Powell River-Sunshine Coast Mathew Wilson
6,602 - 24.53%
Nicholas Simons
13,646 - 50.70%
Kim Darwin
6,505 - 24.17%
Reuben Richards (Cascadia)
160 - 0.59%
Nicholas Simons
West Vancouver-Capilano Ralph Sultan
13,596 - 57.14%
Mehdi Russel
5,622 - 23.63%
Michael Markwick
4,575 - 19.23%
Ralph Sultan
West Vancouver-Sea to Sky Jordan Sturdy
10,449 - 43.08%
Michelle Livaja
6,532 - 26.93%
Dana Moore Taylor
6,947 - 28.64%
Michael Cambridge (Ltn.)
186 - 0.77%
Tristan Andrew Galbraith (Ind.)
143 - 0.59%
Jordan Sturdy

Vancouver Island[edit]

Electoral District Candidates   Incumbent
  Liberal   NDP   Green Other
Courtenay-Comox Jim Benninger
10,697 - 36.72%
Ronna-Rae Leonard
10,886 - 37.36%
Ernie Sellentin
5,351 - 18.37%
Leah Catherine McCulloch (Cons.)
2,201 - 7.55%
Don McRae† (Comox Valley)
Cowichan Valley Steve Housser
8,400 - 27.41%
Lori Lynn Iannidinardo
9,603 - 31.34%
Sonia Furstenau
11,475 - 37.45%
Ian Morrison (Ind.)
502 - 1.64%
James Robert Anderson (Ltn.)
393 - 1.28%
Samuel Lockhart (Ind.)
145 - 0.47%
Eden Haythornthwaite (Ind.)
124 - 0.40%
Bill Routley
Mid Island-Pacific Rim Darren Frank DeLuca
6,578 - 25.69%
Scott Kenneth Fraser
12,556 - 49.04%
Alicia La Rue
5,206 - 20.33%
Julian Fell (Cons.)
878 - 3.43%
Robert Alexander Clarke (Ltn.)
298 - 1.16%
Dan Cebuliak (Refed.)
86 - 0.34%
Scott Fraser
(Alberni-Pacific Rim)
Nanaimo Paris Gaudet
8,912 - 32.54%
Leonard Krog
12,746 - 46.54%
Kathleen Harris
5,454 - 19.91%
Bill Walker (Ltn.)
277 - 1.01%
Leonard Krog
Nanaimo-North Cowichan Alana DeLong
7,380 - 28.20%
Doug Routley
12,275 - 46.90%
Lia Marie Constance Versaevel
6,244 - 23.86%
P. Anna Paddon (Ind.)
274 - 1.05%
Doug Routley
North Island Dallas William Smith
9,148 - 35.47%
Claire Felicity Trevena
12,255 - 47.51%
Sue Moen
3,846 - 14.91%
John M. Twigg (BC First)
543 - 2.11%
Claire Trevena
Parksville-Qualicum Michelle Stilwell
14,468 - 45.13%
Sue Powell
9,189 - 28.66%
Glenn Sollitt
8,157 - 25.44%
Terry Hand (Refed.)
245 - 0.76%
Michelle Stilwell

Greater Victoria[edit]

Electoral District Candidates   Incumbent
  Liberal   NDP   Green Other
Esquimalt-Metchosin Barb Desjardins
7,055 - 27.61%
Mitzi Jayne Dean
11,816 - 46.25%
Andy MacKinnon
6,339 - 24.81%
Josh Steffler (Ltn.)
171 - 0.67%
Delmar Martay (Ind.)
102 - 0.40%
Tyson Riel Strandlund (Comm.)
65 - 0.25%
Maurine Karagianis
(Esquimalt-Royal Roads)
Langford-Juan de Fuca Cathy Noel
6,544 - 26.11%
John Horgan
13,224 - 52.75%
Brendan Ralfs
4,795 - 19.13%
Scott Burton (Ltn.)
262 - 1.05%
Willie Nelson (VIP)
242 - 0.97%
John Horgan
(Juan de Fuca)
Oak Bay-Gordon Head Alex Dutton
6,952 - 23.77%
Bryce Casavant
6,912 - 23.63%
Andrew John Weaver
15,257 - 52.17%
Jin Dong Yang-Riley (VIP)
67 - 0.23%
Xaanja Ganja Free (4BC)
58 - 0.20%
Andrew Weaver
Saanich North and the Islands Stephen P. Roberts
9,321 - 26.46%
Gary Holman
10,764 - 30.56%
Adam Olsen
14,775 - 41.95%
Jordan Templeman (Ind)
364 - 1.03%
Gary Holman
Saanich South David Calder
8,716 - 31.05%
Lana Popham
11,912 - 42.46%
Mark Neufeld
7,129 - 25.39%
Andrew Paul McLean (Ltn.)
177 - 0.63%
Richard Percival Pattee (VIP)
130 - 0.46%
Lana Popham
Victoria-Beacon Hill Karen Bill
4,689 - 15.49%
Carole James
16,057 - 53.05%
Kalen Harris
9,194 - 30.38%
Art Lowe (Ltn.)
190 - 0.63%
Jordan Reichert (Ind.)
102 - 0.34%
David Shebib (Ind.)
35 - 0.12%
Carole James
Victoria-Swan Lake Stacey Piercey
4,005 - 15.87%
Rob Fleming
13,531 - 53.62%
Christopher Alan Maxwell
7,491 - 29.69%
David Costigane (VIP)
207 - 0.82%
Rob Fleming

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ This column denotes seats held by parties at the dissolution of the last term of the assembly.
  2. ^ John Twigg, BC First's only candidate in this election, was its de facto leader.[46][47] The party failed to provide notice of its leadership change to Elections BC before the dropping of the writ, so the de jure leader remained Salvatore Vetro for the duration of the campaign.

References[edit]

  1. ^ JBC Electoral Boundaries Commission Final Report (PDF), 24 September 2015, retrieved 20 June 2016 
  2. ^ McElroy, Justin (May 9, 2017). "B.C. Liberals hang on to power, could form minority government". Retrieved May 12, 2017. 
  3. ^ McElroy, Justin (May 9, 2017). "B.C. Liberals hang on to power, could form minority government". Retrieved May 12, 2017. 
  4. ^ Johnson, Lisa (May 10, 2017). "Greens celebrate 'historic' B.C. wins amid minority uncertainty". Retrieved May 12, 2017. 
  5. ^ Carman, Tara (May 11, 2017). "Absentee ballots in five ridings could decide B.C. election". Retrieved May 12, 2017. 
  6. ^ Hunter, Justine (May 24, 2017). "BC Liberals denied majority as final election count leaves government in danger". The Globe and Mail. Retrieved May 25, 2017. 
  7. ^ Markusoff, Jason (May 10, 2017). "Six ways B.C.’s new government could unfold". Retrieved May 12, 2017. 
  8. ^ Zussman, Richard (May 30, 2017). "NDP-Green alliance to focus on electoral reform, stopping Kinder Morgan and banning big money". CBC News. Retrieved May 30, 2017. 
  9. ^ McElroy, Justin (May 30, 2017). "Christy Clark to stay on as B.C. premier — for now". CBC News. Retrieved May 30, 2017. 
  10. ^ a b Constitution Act, s. 23.
  11. ^ Ferreras, Jesse (March 29, 2017). "B.C. Green Party candidate to run in Richmond. From over 600 km away". Global News. 
  12. ^ "Have you registered to vote in B.C.'s election?". CBC. March 30, 2017. 
  13. ^ "B.C.’s Premier Christy Clark wins byelection, returns to legislature". Toronto Star, July 10, 2013.
  14. ^ "John Horgan acclaimed as B.C. NDP leader". Vancouver Sun. May 1, 2014. Retrieved May 1, 2014. 
  15. ^ "Jane Sterk resigns as Green Party leader". Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. 13 August 2013. Retrieved 20 August 2013. 
  16. ^ "Adam Olsen appointed interim leader of B.C. Green Party". CBC News. August 25, 2013. Retrieved August 26, 2013. 
  17. ^ Bill 20 – Election Amendment Act, 2015, third reading, 26 May 2015. Accessed 23 February 2017.
  18. ^ a b "Media Advisory: Expenses Limits Established for Candidates, Political Parties and Third Party Advertising Sponsors". Elections BC. April 11, 2017. Retrieved April 20, 2017. 
  19. ^ a b c d Tomlinson, Kathy (2017-03-10). "Wild west: How B.C. lobbyists are breaking one of the province’s few political donation rules". The Globe and Mail. Retrieved 2017-04-25. 
  20. ^ Bailey, Ian (2017-01-13). "B.C. Liberals post donations online; party raised $12.5-million in 2016". The Globe and Mail. Retrieved 2017-04-25. 
  21. ^ a b c d https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/13/world/canada/british-columbia-christy-clark.html
  22. ^ a b Hunter, Justine (2017-03-05). "Don’t expect B.C. reform bill to curb cash-for-access". The Globe and Mail. Retrieved 2017-04-25. 
  23. ^ Tomlinson, Kathy (2017-03-05). "Elections B.C. probes Liberal Party fundraising". The Globe and Mail. Retrieved 2017-04-25. 
  24. ^ Cleverley, Bill (2016-09-28). "B.C. Green Party to refuse corporate and union donations". Timescolonist.com. Retrieved 2017-04-25. 
  25. ^ chrome-extension://bpmcpldpdmajfigpchkicefoigmkfalc/views/app.html?uuid=41316261-76bc-4b51-c1ad-02dec43f7716
  26. ^ "2016 Political Party Information Session, Meeting Notes" (pdf). Elections BC. 2016-10-17. Retrieved 2017-04-25. 
  27. ^ "In B.C., hold your nose and vote Liberal". The Globe and Mail. May 5, 2017. Retrieved May 9, 2017. 
  28. ^ "Good managers of economy, Liberals deserve to be re-elected". Vancouver Sun Editorial Board. Retrieved 9 May 2017. 
  29. ^ "Energy and Mines Minister Bill Bennett won't run in next provincial election - British Columbia - CBC News". Cbc.ca. 2016-06-21. Retrieved 2017-02-22. 
  30. ^ Browne, Alex (2016-10-04). "Surrey-White Rock MLA Hogg rejects sixth term to focus on community". peacearchnews.com. Retrieved 2016-10-06. 
  31. ^ Laanela, Mike (2016-09-01). "B.C. Health Minister Terry Lake will not run in upcoming election". CBC News. Retrieved 2016-09-01. 
  32. ^ "MLA McRae stepping away". comoxvalleyrecord.com. Retrieved 2016-04-19. 
  33. ^ Shaw, Rob. "Former Liberal cabinet minister Moira Stilwell to retire from politics". vancouversun.com. Retrieved 2016-06-17. 
  34. ^ "City councillor announces pursuit of Peace River North candidacy - Energeticcity.ca". Energeticcity.ca. Retrieved 2016-04-17. 
  35. ^ "Vicki Huntington not running again". Delta-optimist.com. Retrieved 2017-02-22. 
  36. ^ "Northwestern B.C. MLA won't run again". Terrace Standard. Terrace, British Columbia. May 3, 2016. 
  37. ^ "B.C. NDP MLA Kathy Corrigan retiring, not running in 2017 election". cbc.ca. April 22, 2016. Retrieved 2016-04-23. 
  38. ^ Shaw, Rob (January 4, 2017). "Veteran Surrey MLA Sue Hammell to retire from provincial politics". The Vancouver Sun. 
  39. ^ Shaw, Rob (2016-08-31). "B.C. NDP to lose MLA Maurine Karagianis to retirement". vancouversun.com. Retrieved 2016-09-01. 
  40. ^ Orlando, Aaron (2016-05-25). "Columbia River–Revelstoke MLA Norm Macdonald won’t run in 2017 B.C. general election". Revelstoke Mountaineer. Retrieved 2017-02-22. 
  41. ^ "MLA Bill Boutley to Retire in 2017". Cowichan Valley Citizen. Retrieved 2016-09-01. 
  42. ^ "Jane Shin not running in next provincial election". Burnaby Now. 2016-08-30. Retrieved 2016-09-06. 
  43. ^ "List of registered political parties in B.C." (PDF). Elections BC. Retrieved May 12, 2017. 
  44. ^ "Candidates | Elections BC". Elections BC. May 24, 2017. Retrieved May 25, 2017. 
  45. ^ "Candidates | Elections BC". Elections BC. May 24, 2017. Retrieved May 25, 2017. 
  46. ^ https://thetyee.ca/Opinion/2017/04/29/BC-Parties-Want-Vote/
  47. ^ http://www.bclocalnews.com/news/420154753.html

External links[edit]