423 Diotima

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423 Diotima
423Diotima (Lightcurve Inversion).png
A three-dimensional model of 423 Diotima based on its light curve.
Discovery
Discovered by Auguste Charlois
Discovery date 7 December 1896
Designations
Pronunciation /d.əˈtmə/
Named after
Diotima of Mantinea
1896 DB
Main belt
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 116.96 yr (42719 d)
Aphelion 3.18523 AU (476.504 Gm)
Perihelion 2.95026 AU (441.353 Gm)
3.06774 AU (458.927 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.038297
5.37 yr (1962.6 d)
17.01 km/s
237.495°
0° 11m 0.355s / day
Inclination 11.2304°
69.4710°
200.103°
Earth MOID 1.93679 AU (289.740 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 1.85156 AU (276.989 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.201
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 208.8 ± 4.9 km (IRAS)[1]
171 x 138 km[2]
211.64 ± 16.02 km[3]
Mean radius
104.385±2.45 km
Mass 1.6×1019 kg[4][5]
≈5.1×1018? kg[6]
(6.91 ± 1.93) × 1018 kg[3]
Mean density
1.39 ± 0.50 g/cm3[3]
4.775 h (0.1990 d)[1]
0.0515±0.003[1]
C[1]
7.24[1]

423 Diotima is one of the larger main-belt asteroids. It is classified as a C-type asteroid[1] and is probably composed of primitive carbonaceous material.

It was discovered by Auguste Charlois on December 7, 1896, in Nice. In the late 1990s, a network of astronomers worldwide gathered lightcurve data that was ultimately used to derive the spin states and shape models of 10 new asteroids, including 423 Diotima. The light curve for this asteroid varies "a lot" depending on the position, with the brightness variations ranging from almost zero to up to 0.2 in magnitude.[7][8] Dunham (2002) used 15 chords and obtained an estimated size of 171 x 138 km.[2]

Name[edit]

Diotima is named for Diotima of Mantinea, a priestess who was one of Socrates's teachers. It is one of seven of Charlois's discoveries that was expressly named by the Astromomisches Rechen-Institut (Astronomical Calculation Institute).[9]

The name is stressed on the penultimate syllable, /d.əˈtmə/ dy-ə-TY-mə, or as Latin Diotīma.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 423 Diotima (1896 DB)" (2008-09-09 last obs). Retrieved 6 May 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Vasundhara, R; Kuppuswamy, Ramamoorthy; Velu, Venkataramana (2006). "Occultation of 2UCAC 42376428 by (423) Diotima on 2005 March 06". Astronomical Society of India 34: 21–26. Retrieved 2008-11-30. 
  3. ^ a b c Carry, B. (December 2012), "Density of asteroids", Planetary and Space Science 73, pp. 98–118, arXiv:1203.4336, Bibcode:2012P&SS...73...98C, doi:10.1016/j.pss.2012.03.009.  See Table 1.
  4. ^ Michalak, G. (2001). "Determination of asteroid masses". Astronomy & Astrophysics 374 (2): 703–711. Bibcode:2001A&A...374..703M. doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20010731. Retrieved 2008-11-10. 
  5. ^ Michalak2001 assumed masses of perturbing asteroids used in calculations of perturbations of the test asteroids.
  6. ^ Using the volume of an ellipsoid of 209x171x138km * an assumed density of 2 g/cm³ yields a mass (m=d*v) of 5.1E+18 kg
  7. ^ Durech, J.; et al. (April 2007), "Physical models of ten asteroids from an observers' collaboration network", Astronomy and Astrophysics 465 (1), pp. 331–337, Bibcode:2007A&A...465..331D, doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20066347. 
  8. ^ Durech, J.; Kaasalainen, M.; Marciniak, A.; Allen, W. H. et al. “Asteroid brightness and geometry,” Astronomy and Astrophysics, Volume 465, Issue 1, April I 2007, pp. 331-337.
  9. ^ Schmadel Lutz D. Dictionary of Minor Planet Names (fifth edition), Springer, 2003. ISBN 3-540-00238-3.

External links[edit]