43 Ariadne

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43 Ariadne
43Ariadne (Lightcurve Inversion).png
A three-dimensional model of 43 Ariadne based on its light curve.
Discovery
Discovered by N. R. Pogson
Discovery date April 15, 1857
Designations
Named after
Ariadne
none
Main belt (Flora family)
Orbital characteristics
Epoch November 26, 2005 (JD 2453700.5)
Aphelion 384.954 Gm (2.573 AU)
Perihelion 274.339 Gm (1.834 AU)
329.646 Gm (2.204 AU)
Eccentricity 0.168
1194.766 d (3.27 a)
19.92 km/s
101.582°
Inclination 3.464°
264.937°
15.948°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 95×60×50 km[1][2][3]
Mass (1.21 ± 0.22) × 1018 kg[4]
Mean density
~2.7 g/cm³ (estimate)[5]
8.99 ± 2.57[4] g/cm3
~0.012 m/s² (estimate)
~0.034 km/s (estimate)
0.2401 d[6]
Albedo 0.274 (geometric)[7]
Temperature ~178 K (−95 °C)
max: 275 K (2 °C)
Spectral type
S-type asteroid
8.8[8] to 13.42
7.93
0.11″ to 0.025″

43 Ariadne /ˌæriˈædn/ is a fairly large and bright main-belt asteroid. It is the second-largest member of the Flora asteroid family. It was discovered by N. R. Pogson on April 15, 1857, and named after the Greek heroine Ariadne.

Characteristics[edit]

Ariadne is very elongate (almost twice as long as its smallest dimension) and probably bi-lobed[3] or at least very angular. It is a retrograde rotator, although its pole points almost parallel to the ecliptic towards ecliptic coordinates (β, λ) = (-15°, 253°) with a 10° uncertainty.[2] This gives an axial tilt of about 105°.

Trivia[edit]

  • For reasons unknown, "Asteroid 43 Ariadne" was included in a list of names of supporters of the NASA spacecraft Stardust that was stored on a microchip within the spacecraft.
  • The maximum apparent size of Ariadne is equivalent to the maximum apparent size of Pluto.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2005-12-11. Retrieved 2005-12-11. 
  2. ^ a b Kaasalainen, M.; Torppa, J.; Piironen, J. (2002). "Models of Twenty Asteroids from Photometric Data" (PDF). Icarus. 159 (2): 369–395. Bibcode:2002Icar..159..369K. doi:10.1006/icar.2002.6907. 
  3. ^ a b Tanga, P.; et al. (2003). "Asteroid observations with the Hubble Space Telescope" (PDF). Astronomy & Astrophysics. 401 (2): 733–741. Bibcode:2003A&A...401..733T. doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20030032. 
  4. ^ a b Carry, B. (December 2012), "Density of asteroids", Planetary and Space Science, 73, pp. 98–118, arXiv:1203.4336Freely accessible, Bibcode:2012P&SS...73...98C, doi:10.1016/j.pss.2012.03.009.  See Table 1.
  5. ^ Krasinsky, G. A.; et al. (2002). "Hidden Mass in the Asteroid Belt". Icarus. 158 (1): 98–105. Bibcode:2002Icar..158...98K. doi:10.1006/icar.2002.6837. 
  6. ^ PDS lightcurve data Archived June 14, 2006, at the Wayback Machine.
  7. ^ Supplemental IRAS Minor Planet Survey Archived June 23, 2006, at the Wayback Machine.
  8. ^ "AstDys (43) Ariadne Ephemerides". Department of Mathematics, University of Pisa, Italy. Retrieved 2010-06-26. 

External links[edit]