44M Tas

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44M Tas
Type Medium / Heavy tank
Place of origin Kingdom of Hungary
Service history
Used by Kingdom of Hungary
Wars World War II
Production history
Designer Manfred Weiss Works
Designed 1943
Manufacturer Manfred Weiss Works
Produced 1943–1944
No. built 1 prototype
Specifications
Weight 38 tonnes (37 long tons; 42 short tons) [1]
Length 9.2 metres (30 ft 2 in) gun forward[1]
Width 3.5 metres (11 ft 6 in)[1]
Height 3 metres (9 ft 10 in)[1]
Crew 5[1]

Armor 50–120 mm (2.0–4.7 in)
Main
armament
1 × 7.5 cm KwK 42 L/70 [1]
Secondary
armament
2 × 34/40A M 8 mm machine gun
Engine 2 x gasoline Manfred Weiss-Z[1]
520 hp (390 kW)
2 x 260 hp (2 x 195 kW)[1]
Power/weight 13.68 hp/ton
Operational
range
200 km (120 mi)
Speed 45 km/h (28 mph)

The 44M Tas was a Hungarian medium/heavy tank design of World War II. The only prototype built was destroyed when the Manfred Weiss factory was bombed in 1944.

Design[edit]

Designed as a cheaper and home-made alternative to German-built Panthers in 1943, a sole mild steel prototype was built by the Manfred Weiss factory. When the factory was bombed by American aircraft on 27 July 1944, both the factory and the prototype were destroyed and no further production followed.

Like its German counterpart, the 44M Tas was to be armed with the powerful and modern 7.5 cm KwK 42 anti-tank gun. It also shared a similar layout and suspension, with six road wheels on semi-elliptical springs. As the Germans were unwilling to offer their Hungarian allies the powerful Maybach HL230 engine, the 44M Tas was powered by two 260 hp gasoline-powered "Manfred Weiss-Z" engines, identical to those already in production for the 40M Turán I tank.

Related development[edit]

In parallel to the 44M tank, development of the 44M Tas Rohamlöveg tank destroyer was started; this vehicle shared most of the new tank's elements.

See also[edit]

Similar tanks

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h For The Record website.

Bibliography[edit]

  • J C M Probst. "Hungarian armour during WW2". Airfix Magazine (September 1976). 

External links[edit]