4899 Candace

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4899 Candace
Discovery
Discovered by Carolyn S. Shoemaker
Discovery site Palomar Observatory
Discovery date 9 May 1988
Designations
MPC designation (4899) Candace
1988 JU
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 14218 days (38.93 yr)
Aphelion 2.8116826 AU (420.62173 Gm)
Perihelion 1.9311699 AU (288.89890 Gm)
2.3714263 AU (354.76033 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.1856504
3.65 yr (1333.9 d)
169.26819°
0° 16m 11.61s / day
Inclination 22.564721°
190.20043°
74.379438°
Earth MOID 1.03408 AU (154.696 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 2.41595 AU (361.421 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.419
Physical characteristics
40.7 h (1.70 d)
12.9

4899 Candace is a main belt asteroid with a perihelion of 1.983 AU. It has an eccentricity of 0.184 and an orbital period of 1334.3 days (3.65 years).[1]

Candace has an average orbital speed of 19.33727037 km/s and an inclination of 22.58204°.

The asteroid was discovered on May 9, 1988 by Carolyn S. Shoemaker and Eugene M. Shoemaker at Palomar. It was named for Candace P. Kohl, American chemist and a leading investigator of ancient solar activity through analysis of solar cosmic-ray-produced nuclides in lunar samples. She has also contributed importantly in the development of techniques for dating surface exposure of materials on the earth from cosmic-ray-produced nuclides. Through her popular lectures on meteorites, the moon and the solar system, Kohl has reached a wide audience ranging from primary-school children to high-school students and the lay community. Citation provided by K. Nishiizumi at the request of the discoverers.[2][3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "JPL Small-Body Database Browser". NASA. Retrieved 13 April 2016. 
  2. ^ Dictionary of Minor Planet Names - ISBN 3-540-14814-0 - Copyright © 1999 by Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg
  3. ^ Solar Eclipse Newsletter, May 2003, Vol. 8, Issue 5, p.3

External links[edit]