4th Legislative District (New Jersey)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
New Jersey's 4th Legislative District
New Jersey Legislative Districts Map (2011) D04 hl.svg
Senator Fred H. Madden (D)
Assembly members Paul Moriarty (D)
Gabriela Mosquera (D)
Registration
Demographics
Population 219,804
Voting-age population 167,694
Registered voters 151,372

New Jersey's 4th Legislative District is one of 40 in the state. As of the 2011 apportionment the district covers the Camden County municipalities of Chesilhurst, Clementon, Gloucester Township, Laurel Springs, Lindenwold and Winslow Township; and the Gloucester County municipalities of Monroe Township, Pitman and Washington Township.[1]

Demographic characteristics[edit]

As of the 2010 United States Census, the district had a population of 219,804, of whom 167,694 (76.3%) were of voting age. The racial makeup of the district was 172,500 (78.5%) White, 30,289 (13.8%) African American, 429 (0.2%) Native American, 6,510 (3.0%) Asian, 56 (0.0%) Pacific Islander, 5,024 (2.3%) from some other race, and 4,996 (2.3%) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 13,938 (6.3%) of the population.[2]

The district's percentage of people of Asian origin, the elderly and Hispanics are all below the state average, while the percentage of foreign-born residents was the second lowest in the state based on 2000 Census data.[3][4]

The district had 151,372 registered voters as of November 2013, of whom 67,979 (44.9%) were registered as unaffiliated, 59,007 (39.0%) were registered as Democrats, 24,258 (16.0%) were registered as Republicans and 128 (0.1%) were registered to other parties.[5]

Political representation[edit]

The district is represented for the 2016–2017 Legislative Session (Senate, General Assembly) in the State Senate by Fred H. Madden (D, Washington Township) and in the General Assembly by Paul Moriarty (R, Washington Township) and Gabriela Mosquera (D, Gloucester Township).[6][7]

1965-1973[edit]

During the period of time after the 1964 Supreme Court decision in Reynolds v. Sims and before the establishment of a 40-district legislature in 1973, the 4th District consisted of all of Burlington County for the 1965 Senate election and a combination of Burlington and Ocean counties for the 1967, 1969, and 1971 Senate and Assembly elections.[8][9][10]

In the 1965 election in which the Senator was elected from voters from the entire district, incumbent Republican Senator from Burlington County Edwin B. Forsythe won re-election.[8] For the 1967 Senate election for a four-year term which allowed for the election of two Senators from the district, Senate candidates were nominated from each Assembly district. Republican William T. Hiering won from Assembly District 4A (consisting of all of Ocean County and rural eastern Burlington County[9]) while Republican Forsythe won from District 4B, which consisted of the suburban remainder of Burlington.[11] Forsythe was elected to Congress in 1970 and resigned on November 16, 1970 to take his seat there.[12] Walter L. Smith, a Republican Assemblyman, was elected to complete the remainder of Forsythe's term in a March 2, 1971 special election and was sworn in on March 15, 1971.[12] In the 1971 general election for a two-year Senate term, again candidates were nominated by Assembly district (three districts in this instance). Republican John F. Brown won District 4A (most of Ocean County), Republican Barry T. Parker won from District 4B (Manchester, Berkeley townships and other small small boroughs in Ocean County plus most of Burlington County), and Democrat Edward J. Hughes, Jr. won from District 4C (suburban Burlington County).[13][10]

For the Assembly elections held during this time, each district elected two members to the General Assembly. For the 1967 and 1969 elections, the Senate district was split into two districts and for the 1971 election, it was split into three. The members elected to the Assembly from each district are as follows:[11][14][13]

Session District 4A District 4B District 4C
1968–1969 John F. Brown (R) Walter L. Smith (R)
Benjamin H. Mabie (R) Barry T. Parker (R)
1970–1971 John F. Brown (R) Walter L. Smith (R)[A 1]
Benjamin H. Mabie (R) Barry T. Parker (R)
1972–1973 Franklin H. Berry (R) Benjamin H. Mabie (R) Charles B. Yates (D)
James J. Mancini (R) H. Kenneth Wilkie (R) George H. Barbour (D)
  1. ^ Resigned on March 15, 1971 after being elected to the Senate

Election history since 1973[edit]

Upon the creation of a 40-district legislative map in 1973, the new 4th District consisted of portions of Gloucester County (Elk Township, Glassboro, Washington Township, and Deptford Township), Camden County stretching from Gloucester City southeast to Winslow Township, northeast to Chesilhurst and Waterford Township, and into Burlington County's Shamong Township and Tabernacle Township.[15] In the 1981 redistricting, the 4th consisted of southern Camden County (including Waterford, Winslow, and Gloucester townships, plus Chesilhurst, Lindenwold, and Laurel Springs), most of southeastern Gloucester County, and the Atlantic County municipalities of Buena, Buena Vista Township, and Folsom.[16] In March 1989, five-term incumbent Dennis L. Riley announced that he would not be running for another term in the Assembly, and endorsed Gloucester Township Mayor Ann A. Mullen to fill his seat.[17]

After years in which the district had been solidly Democratic, the Republican sweep in 1991 led to a period in which the district became what PolitickerNJ called the "#1 swing seat" in the state for more than a decade.[18] The 1990s iteration of the district was composed of Gloucester Township, Lindenwold, and Laurel Springs in Camden County and a larger portion of southeastern Gloucester County.[19] In the 1991 elections, attorney John J. Matheussen won the open seat of the departing incumbent Democrat Daniel J. Dalton who had left office to take the post of Secretary of State of New Jersey, having been nominated for the position by Governor of New Jersey James Florio.[20] In the 1991 Assembly race George F. Geist and Mary Virginia Weber took the seat of incumbent Ann A. Mullen and her Democratic running mate Timothy D. Scaffidi.[18]

Sean F. Dalton, won an Assembly seat in the 1993 election in a split verdict, with Republican George Geist coming in first, Dalton in second, incumbent Republican Mary Virginia Weber out of the money in third place and Dalton's running mate Sandra Love in fourth.[21] Geist and Dalton were re-elected in 1995, with Democrat Chris Manganello in third and Republican Gerald Luongo in fourth.[22] The $1 million spent by the candidates in the 1993 Assembly race was the most of any district in the state, and The New York Times predicted that the parties would spend heavily in the 1995 race as each side tries to gain both seats.[23] Dalton ran in 1997, and lost, in a bid for the New Jersey Senate seat held by John J. Matheussen, with Matheussen taking 50.7% of the vote, Dalton receiving 46.1% and Jame E. Barber garnering 3.2% of the vote.[24][25] With Dalton's seat open in the Assembly, Geist won re-election as did his running mate Gerald Luongo.[26][27] With Luongo receiving negative press over what The New York Times called a "questionable land deal", Democrat Robert J. Smith II knocked off Luongo in the 1999 general election, while Geist was re-elected.[28]

In the 2001 reapportionment, Elk Township and Clayton from the Gloucester portion of the district but more boroughs in central Camden County were added.[29] Matheussen was nominated by Governor Jim McGreevey in February 2003 to head the Delaware River Port Authority.[30] After Matheussen resigned from the Senate in May 2003 to take the post at the DRPA, his Senate seat was filled by Assemblyman George Geist.[31] In turn, the Republicans named Stephen Altamuro to fill Geist's vacancy in the Assembly. In the 2003 elections, the Democrats swept all three legislative seats, with Fred H. Madden defeating Geist in the Senate, and David R. Mayer and Robert J. Smith II winning in the Assembly race, knocking off incumbent Altamuro.[32][33]

The 2011 apportionment added Chesilhurst and Winslow Township, both from the 6th District. Municipalities that had been in the 4th District as part of the 2001 apportionment that were shifted out of the district as of 2011 are Franklin Township (Gloucester), Glassboro, and Newfield (all to the 3rd District).[34] In the 2011 Assembly race, Democrat Gabriela Mosquera took the seat that had been held by Republican Domenick DiCicco, who had been shifted out of the district in the 2011 reapportionment. Democratic incumbent Paul Moriarty and Mosquera won the election, though Mosquera's victory was challenged based on her not having been a resident of the district for a full year and she did not take office until March 2012 in the face of legal challenges.[35]

Session State Senate Assembly
1974–1975 Joseph A. Maressa (D) Kenneth A. Gewertz (D) Francis J. Gorman (D)
1976–1977 Kenneth A. Gewertz (D) Francis J. Gorman (D)
1978–1979 Joseph A. Maressa (D) Kenneth A. Gewertz (D) Francis J. Gorman (D)
1980–1981 Daniel J. Dalton (D) Dennis L. Riley (D)
1982–1983 Daniel J. Dalton (D) Anthony S. Marsella (D) Dennis L. Riley (D)
1984–1985 Daniel J. Dalton (D) Anthony S. Marsella (D) Dennis L. Riley (D)
1986–1987 Anthony S. Marsella (D) Dennis L. Riley (D)
1988–1989 Daniel J. Dalton (D) Anthony S. Marsella (D) Dennis L. Riley (D)
1990–1991[36] Anthony S. Marsella (D) Ann A. Mullen (D)
1992–1993 John J. Matheussen (R) George Geist (R) Mary Virginia Weber (R)
1994–1995[21] John J. Matheussen (R) George Geist (R) Sean F. Dalton (D)
1996–1997 George Geist (R) Sean F. Dalton (D)
1998–1999[27] John J. Matheussen (R) George Geist (R) Gerald Luongo (R)
2000–2001[28] George Geist (R) Robert J. Smith II (D)
2002–2003[37] John J. Matheussen (R)[n 1] 
George Geist (R)[n 2] Robert J. Smith II
George Geist (R)[n 2] Stephen Altamuro (R)[n 3]
2004–2005[33] Fred H. Madden (D) David R. Mayer (D) Robert J. Smith II (D)
2006–2007 David R. Mayer (D) Paul Moriarty (D)
2008–2009 Fred H. Madden (D) Sandra Love (D) Paul Moriarty (D)
2010–2011 Domenick DiCicco (R) Paul Moriarty (D)
2012–2013 Fred H. Madden (D) Gabriela Mosquera (D)[n 4] Paul Moriarty (D)
2014–2015 Fred H. Madden (D) Gabriela Mosquera (D) Paul Moriarty (D)
2016–2017 Gabriela Mosquera (D) Paul Moriarty (D)
  1. ^ Resigned on May 28, 2003 to become head of the Delaware River Port Authority
  2. ^ a b Appointed to the Senate on May 28, 2003 to fill the unexpired term of John Matheussen
  3. ^ Appointed to the Assembly on June 5, 2003
  4. ^ Was elected in the November 2011 general election but was not seated due to residency dispute, was appointed to the vacant seat by district Democrats and sworn in on March 5, 2012,[38] won special election held in November 2012

Election results[edit]

Senate[edit]

New Jersey general election, 1973[39]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Joseph A. Maressa 31,729 63.8
Republican Thomas E. Jenkins 18,012 36.2
Total votes 49,741 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1977[40]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Joseph A. Maressa 35,736 65.0
Republican Walter C. Gebelein 19,248 35.0
Total votes 54,984 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1981[41]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Daniel J. Dalton 32,386 63.3
Republican Frank B. Smith 18,755 36.7
Total votes 51,141 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1983[42]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Daniel J. Dalton 21,891 63.9
Republican Christopher Michaele 12,379 36.1
Total votes 34,270 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1987[43]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Daniel J. Dalton 24,574 58.9
Republican William F. Thomson 17,148 41.1
Total votes 41,722 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1991[44]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John J. Mattheusen 21,553 51.7
Democratic Anthony S. Marsella 20,118 48.3
Total votes 41,671 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1993[45]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John J. Mattheusen 29,483 54.3
Democratic Bernard "Ben" Lynch 24,799 45.7
Total votes 54,282 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1997[46]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John J. Mattheusen 29,429 50.7
Democratic Sean F. Dalton 26,780 46.1
Independent Jim Barber 1,872 3.2
Total votes 58,081 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2001[47]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican John J. Mattheusen 28,530 58.2
Democratic Joseph L. Manganello 20,451 41.8
Total votes 48,981 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2003[48]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Fred Madden 20,752 50.1
Republican George F. Geist 20,689 49.9
Total votes 41,441 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2007[49]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Fred Madden 21,395 59.8
Republican Shelley Lovett 14,364 40.2
Total votes 35,759 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2011[50]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Fred H. Madden 23,868 62.1
Republican Giancarlo D'Orazio 14,569 37.9
Total votes 38,437 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2013[51]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Fred H. Madden 29,439 57.9
Republican Giancarlo D'Orazio 21,376 42.1
Total votes 50,815 100.0

Assembly[edit]

New Jersey general election, 1973[39]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Kenneth A. Gewertz 31,355 32.2
Democratic Francis J. Gorman 30,765 31.6
Republican Anthony P. Costa 17,794 18.3
Republican Frank B. Smith 17,349 17.8
Total votes 97,263 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1975[52]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Kenneth A. Gewertz 29,451 32.1
Democratic Francis J. Gorman 27,711 30.2
Republican Frank B. Smith 17,569 19.1
Republican John F. Henderson 17,019 18.5
Total votes 91,750 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1977[40]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Kenneth A. Gewertz 34,657 32.6
Democratic Francis J. Gorman 33,613 31.6
Republican Paul J. Tully 19,763 18.6
Republican Lino C. Bernardi 18,325 17.2
Total votes 106,358 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1979[53]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Daniel J. Dalton 26,229 29.7
Democratic Dennis L. Riley 26,024 29.4
Republican Frederick A. Busch 18,080 20.5
Republican Mark J. Haas 18,035 20.4
Total votes 88,368 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1981[41]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Anthony S. Marsella 30,792 30.8
Democratic Dennis L. Riley 30,621 30.6
Republican John Votta 19,450 19.5
Republican Richard A. Stumpf 19,103 19.1
Total votes 99,966 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1983[42]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Anthony S. Marsella 20,602 30.7
Democratic Dennis L. Riley 20,278 30.2
Republican Jacqueline Clark 13,627 20.3
Republican Ronald L. Passarella 12,663 18.9
Total votes 67,170 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1985[54]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Anthony S. Marsella 23,162 27.3
Democratic Dennis L. Riley 22,703 26.8
Republican Frank F. Senatore 19,621 23.1
Republican William F. Thomson 19,307 22.8
Total votes 84,793 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1987[43]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Anthony S. Marsella 22,942 27.8
Democratic Dennis L. Riley 22,676 27.4
Republican Wayne S. Wooster 18,615 22.5
Republican John Matheussen 18,408 22.3
Total votes 82,641 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1989[55]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Anthony S. Marsella 36,248 32.2
Democratic Ann A. Mullen 34,967 31.0
Republican Phil Donohue 21,486 19.1
Republican Frank J. Reed III 19,916 17.7
Total votes 112,617 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1991[44]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Mary Virginia "Ginny" Weber 21,262 26.2
Republican George F. Geist 20,455 25.2
Democratic Ann A. Mullen 20,143 24.8
Democratic Timothy D. Scaffidi 19,285 23.8
Total votes 81,145 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1993[45]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican George F. Geist 26,428 25.0
Democratic Sean F. Dalton 26,366 25.0
Republican Mary Virginia "Ginny" Weber 25,667 24.3
Democratic Sandra L. Love 25,046 23.7
Independent Kirk Errickson 2,061 2.0
Total votes 105,568 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1995[56]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Sean F. Dalton 18,219 25.8
Republican George F. Geist 18,082 25.6
Democratic Chris Manganello 16,114 22.8
Republican Gerald J. Luongo 14,769 20.9
Independent Tom Dooley 1,816 2.6
Independent Carol Dooley 1,573 2.2
Total votes 70,573 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1997[57]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican George F. Geist 28,114 25.8
Republican Gerald J. Luongo 26,535 24.3
Democratic Anthony S. Marsella 25,310 23.2
Democratic John "Jack" Luby 23,538 21.6
Independent J. Edw. Gormley 3,213 2.9
Independent Cynthia A. Merckx 2,394 2.2
Total votes 109,104 100.0
New Jersey general election, 1999[58]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican George F. Geist 19,694 27.2
Democratic Robert J. Smith 18,823 26.0
Democratic David Carlamere 17,422 24.0
Republican Gerald J. Luongo 16,502 22.8
Total votes 72,441 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2001[59]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican George F. Geist 26,825 28.0
Democratic Robert J. Smith 24,845 25.9
Democratic David F. Carlamere 23,729 24.8
Republican Sherie Y. Jenkins 20,428 21.3
Total votes 95,827 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2003[60]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Robert Smith 22,256 27.3
Democratic David R. Mayer 21,965 27.0
Republican Patrick M. Dougherty 18,641 22.9
Republican Stephen Altamuro 18,636 22.9
Total votes 81,498 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2005[61]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Paul D. Moriarty 31,976 31.8
Democratic David R. Mayer 31,948 31.8
Republican Frank Winters 18,908 18.8
Republican Corey Ahart 17,597 17.5
Total votes 100,429 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2007[62]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Sandra Love 19,429 27.9
Democratic Paul D. Moriarty 19,357 27.8
Republican Patricia Fratticcioli 15,656 22.5
Republican Agnes Gardiner 15,238 21.9
Total votes 69,680 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2009[63]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Paul Moriarty 28,680 26.3
Republican Domenick DiCicco 27,408 25.2
Democratic William Collins 26,807 24.6
Republican Eugene E. T. Lawrence 26,027 23.9
Total votes 108,922 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2011[64]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Paul D. Moriarty 22,734 30.0
Democratic Gabriela Mosquera 21,461 28.3
Republican Shelley Lovett 15,106 19.9
Republican Patricia Fratticcioli 14,725 19.4
Independent Tony Celeste 1,843 2.4
Total votes 75,869 100.0
Special election, November 6, 2012[65]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Gabriela M. Mosquera 55,027 60.6
Republican Shelley Lovett 35,835 39.4
Total votes 90,862 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2013[66]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Paul D. Moriarty 28,527 29.0
Democratic Gabriela M. Mosquera 27,095 27.6
Republican Philip Dieser 21,702 22.1
Republican Theodore M. Liddell 20,998 21.4
Total votes 98,322 100.0
New Jersey general election, 2015[67]
Party Candidate Votes %
Democratic Paul D. Moriarty 17,454 30.4
Democratic Gabriela M. Mosquera 17,147 29.9
Republican Kevin P. Murphy 11,592 20.2
Republican Jack Nicholson 11,131 19.4
Total votes 57,324 100.0


References[edit]

  1. ^ Districts by Number, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 29, 2014.
  2. ^ DP-1: Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 - 2010 Demographic Profile Data for General Assembly District 4 (2010), New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed January 29, 2014.
  3. ^ District 4 Profile, Rutgers University. Accessed June 17, 2010.
  4. ^ 2005 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book. Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy. p. 23. 
  5. ^ Statewide Voter Registration Summary, New Jersey Department of State, November 28, 2013. Accessed January 28, 2014.
  6. ^ Legislative Roster 2016-2017 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 14, 2016.
  7. ^ District 4 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 14, 2016.
  8. ^ a b "Results of the General Election Held on November 2, 1965" (PDF). Secretary of State of New Jersey. Retrieved July 18, 2015. 
  9. ^ a b New Jersey Apportionment Commission (July 20, 1967). "New Jersey Senate and Assembly Districts" (PDF). Retrieved July 18, 2015. 
  10. ^ a b State of New Jersey (1971). "New Jersey Senate and Assembly Districts 1972–1973" (PDF). Retrieved July 18, 2015. 
  11. ^ a b "Results of the General Election Held on November 7, 1967" (PDF). Secretary of State of New Jersey. Retrieved July 18, 2015. 
  12. ^ a b Manual of the Legislature of New Jersey - Two Hundred and Eleventh Legislature (First Session) (PDF). Skinder-Strauss Associates. 2004. Retrieved July 18, 2015. 
  13. ^ a b "Results of the General Election Held on November 2, 1971" (PDF). Secretary of State of New Jersey. Retrieved July 18, 2015. 
  14. ^ "Results of the General Election Held on November 4, 1969" (PDF). Secretary of State of New Jersey. Retrieved July 18, 2015. 
  15. ^ "New Jersey Legislative Districts 1974–" (PDF). New Jersey Legislative Services Agency. 1973. Retrieved July 18, 2015. 
  16. ^ "New Jersey Legislative Districts" (PDF). 1981. Retrieved July 18, 2015. 
  17. ^ Donohue, Joseph. "`FATIGUED'RILEY WON'T SEEK RE-ELECTION TO ASSEMBLY", The Press of Atlantic City, March 3, 1989. Accessed June 19, 2010.
  18. ^ a b Edge, Wally. "No Love in 4th, the state's #1 swing seat for a dozen years", Politicker Network, February 26, 2009. Accessed June 18, 2010.
  19. ^ "1991 Legislative Districts" (PDF). 1991. Retrieved July 18, 2015. 
  20. ^ Tedeschi, Bruno. "Drive, not cash, fuels Matheussen's Senate bid", The Record (Bergen County), May 31, 2002. Accessed June 18, 2010. "Matheussen a lawyer with the Philadelphia firm Dilworth Paxson was first elected to the state Senate in 1991 winning an open seat previously held by Democrat Daniel Dalton the Senate majority leader who became Florio's secretary of state."
  21. ^ a b Sullivan, Joseph F. "THE 1993 ELECTIONS: New Jersey Legislature; Cut Taxes 30 Percent? Whitman's Top Statehouse Allies Say Not So Fast", The New York Times, November 4, 1993. Accessed June 17, 2010.
  22. ^ "Official List General Election Returns for the Office of General Assembly for Election Held November 7, 1995" (PDF). Secretary of State of New Jersey. December 4, 1995. Retrieved July 18, 2015. 
  23. ^ Peterson, Iver. "ON POLITICS; It's Never Too Early To Look for Some Votes", The New York Times, August 6, 1995. Accessed June 17, 2010.
  24. ^ "Official List General Election Returns for the Office of General Assembly for Election Held November 4, 1997" (PDF). Secretary of State of New Jersey. December 2, 1997. Retrieved July 18, 2015. 
  25. ^ Staff. "Results of Senate Races; The Party Lines Hold in the Senate", The New York Times, November 9, 1997. Accessed June 17, 2010.
  26. ^ Staff. "ELECTION '97; Then There Were 80: Assembly Race Results", The New York Times, November 9, 1997. Accessed June 17, 2010.
  27. ^ a b Staff. "THE 1997 ELECTIONS: RESULTS; The Races for the New Jersey Assembly", The New York Times, November 5, 1997. Accessed June 17, 2010.
  28. ^ a b Kocieniewski, David. "THE 1999 ELECTIONS: NEW JERSEY ASSEMBLY; Democrats Win Seats in Three Districts, Narrowing Republicans' Majority", The New York Times, November 3, 1999. Accessed June 17, 2010.
  29. ^ "2001 Legislative Districts" (PDF). 2001. Retrieved July 18, 2015. 
  30. ^ Mansnerus, Laura. "Senator Named to Delaware River Authority", The New York Times, February 27, 2003. Accessed June 17, 2010.
  31. ^ Grabell, Michael J. "BRIEFINGS: LEGISLATURE; SENATE RACE SHAPES UP", The New York Times, April 6, 2003. Accessed June 17, 2010.
  32. ^ Staff. "Democrats gain an Assembly seat, South Jersey Democrats take control of an Assembly seat", Philadelphia Inquirer, November 5, 2003. Accessed June 17, 2010.
  33. ^ a b Kocieniewski, David. "THE 2003 ELECTION: THE STATEHOUSE; Democrats Seize Senate And Widen Assembly Gap", The New York Times, November 5, 2003. Accessed June 17, 2010.
  34. ^ Districts by Number, New Jersey Legislature, backed up by the Internet Archive as of November 12, 2011. Accessed April 13, 2013.
  35. ^ Osborne, James. "Lovett and Mosquera face off again for Assembly seat", The Philadelphia Inquirer, October 18, 2012. Accessed April 13, 2013. "The two women's paths converged in 2011 when a seat in the Fourth opened up after redistricting pushed Republican Dominick DiCicco into the Third District, and the Democrats gave Mosquera the nod. With a newly configured district, Mosquera and Assemblyman Paul D. Moriarty won easily, almost doubling their Republican opponents' vote counts."
  36. ^ Staff. "Vote Totals for the Elections Held on Tuesday in New York and New Jersey", The New York Times, November 9, 1989. Accessed June 18, 2010.
  37. ^ Staff. "THE 2001 ELECTIONS; RESULTS -- The Races for New Jersey", The New York Times, November 8, 2001. Accessed June 17, 2010.
  38. ^ Romalino, Carly Q. (March 5, 2012). "Gabriela Mosquera takes oath of office as newest Fourth District Assembly member". South Jersey Times. Retrieved August 30, 2015. 
  39. ^ a b "Results of the General Election Held November 6, 1973" (PDF). Retrieved December 6, 2015. 
  40. ^ a b "Results of the General Election Held November 8, 1977" (PDF). Retrieved December 6, 2015. 
  41. ^ a b "Candidates for the Offices of State Senate and General Assembly" (PDF). Retrieved December 6, 2015. 
  42. ^ a b "Candidates for the Offices of State Senate and General Assembly" (PDF). Retrieved December 6, 2015. 
  43. ^ a b "Candidates for the Offices of State Senate and General Assembly" (PDF). Retrieved December 6, 2015. 
  44. ^ a b "Official Results, General Election, November 5, 1991" (PDF). Retrieved December 6, 2015. 
  45. ^ a b "Official List, General Election Returns for the Office of Senate and Assembly for Election Held November 2, 1993" (PDF). Retrieved December 6, 2015. 
  46. ^ "Official Results, General Election Returns for the Office of State Senate for Election Held November 4, 1997" (PDF). Retrieved December 6, 2015. 
  47. ^ "Official List, Candidate Returns for State Senate for November 2001 General Election" (PDF). Retrieved December 6, 2015. 
  48. ^ "Official List, Candidate Returns for State Senate for November 2003 General Election" (PDF). Retrieved December 6, 2015. 
  49. ^ "Official List, Candidate Returns for State Senate for November 2007 General Election" (PDF). Retrieved December 6, 2015. 
  50. ^ "Official List, Candidate Returns for State Senate for November 2011 General Election" (PDF). Retrieved December 6, 2015. 
  51. ^ "Official List, Candidates for State Senate for GENERAL ELECTION 11/05/2013 Election" (PDF). Retrieved December 6, 2015. 
  52. ^ "Results of the General Election Held November 4, 1975" (PDF). Retrieved December 6, 2015. 
  53. ^ "Results of the General Election Held on November 6, 1979" (PDF). Retrieved December 6, 2015. 
  54. ^ "Candidates for the Office of General Assembly" (PDF). Retrieved December 6, 2015. 
  55. ^ "Candidates for the Office of General Assembly" (PDF). Retrieved December 6, 2015. 
  56. ^ "Official List, General Election Results for the Office of General Assembly for Election Held November 7, 1995" (PDF). Retrieved December 6, 2015. 
  57. ^ "Official Results, General Election Returns for the Office of State Assembly for Election Held November 4, 1997" (PDF). Retrieved December 6, 2015. 
  58. ^ "Official List, Candidate Returns for General Assembly 01-11-2010 for November 1999 General Election" (PDF). Retrieved December 6, 2015. 
  59. ^ "Official List, Candidate Returns for General Assembly for November 2001 General Election" (PDF). Retrieved December 6, 2015. 
  60. ^ "Official List, Candidate Returns for General Assembly 12-02-2003 for November 2003 General Election" (PDF). Retrieved December 6, 2015. 
  61. ^ "Official List, Candidate Returns for General Assembly for November 2005 General Election" (PDF). Retrieved December 6, 2015. 
  62. ^ "Official List, Candidate Returns for General Assembly for November 2007 General Election" (PDF). Retrieved December 6, 2015. 
  63. ^ "Official List, Candidate Returns for General Assembly for November 2009 General Election" (PDF). Retrieved December 6, 2015. 
  64. ^ "Official List, Candidate Returns for General Assembly for November 2011 General Election" (PDF). Retrieved December 6, 2015. 
  65. ^ "Official List, Candidates for Special General Assembly for GENERAL ELECTION 11/06/2012 Election" (PDF). Retrieved December 6, 2015. 
  66. ^ "Official List, Candidates for General Assembly for GENERAL ELECTION 11/05/2013 Election" (PDF). Retrieved December 6, 2015. 
  67. ^ "Official List, Candidates for General Assembly for GENERAL ELECTION 11/03/2015 Election" (PDF). Retrieved December 6, 2015.