5-hour Energy

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5-hour Energy
5-Hour Energy.png
Type Energy shot
Manufacturer Living Essentials
Country of origin United States
Introduced 2009
Website 5hourenergy.com

5-hour Energy (stylized as 5-hour ENERGY) is an American made "energy shot" manufactured by Living Essentials LLC. The company was founded by CEO Manoj Bhargava and launched in 2003.

Ingredients[edit]

The official website lists the active ingredients of 5-hour Energy as: vitamin B6, folic acid, vitamin B12, sodium, taurine, glucuronolactone, malic acid and N-Acetyl L-tyrosine, L-phenylalanine, caffeine, and citicoline.[1] The product is not U.S Food and Drug Administration approved and contains no sugar or herbal stimulants.[2] According to an article in Consumer Reports, 5-hour Energy should be avoided by children 12 and under as well as nursing or pregnant women.[3]

History[edit]

In 2003 Manoj Bhargava's company, Living Essentials LLC, launched a product called "5-Hour Energy".[4][5][6] By 2012, retail sales had grown to an estimated $1 billion.[4]

A March 2011 article in Consumer Reports reported that, according to a lab test, the caffeine content of 5-Hour Energy was 207mg.[3] (It is not clear whether the "Original" or "Extra Strength" product was tested.) The maker claims the product "contains caffeine comparable to a cup of the leading premium coffee". The directions on the 5-Hour bottle recommend taking half of the contents (103 mg of caffeine) for regular use, and the whole bottle for extra energy. A regular cup of coffee has less than 100 mg/250 ml cup.[7]

In 2012, Forbes magazine commissioned an independent lab to analyze the contents within full bottles of 5-Hour Energy. The findings showed that the regular strength 5-Hour Energy contained 157mg of caffeine, whereas the Extra Strength version had a caffeine content of 206mg.[8]

In December 2012, Consumer Reports published an article on 27 energy drinks including 5-hour Energy, which compared the caffeine content of the 27 drinks. Caffeine levels in 5-hour Energy are: Decaf (6 mg), Original (215 mg), and Extra Strength (242 mg).[9] The publication also reviewed a double blind study and reported that "5-Hour Energy will probably chase away grogginess at least as well as a cup of coffee" and that "little if any research" indicated that amino acids and B vitamins would result in a difference in energy level.[3]

Reception[edit]

A lawsuit against Living Essentials, the manufacturer of 5-hour Energy, was filed in 2010, alleging health hazards and deceptive labeling.[10] The case was voluntarily dismissed in December 2011.[11]

In 2012, the media reported that the FDA was investigating allegations that Bhargava's 5-Hour Energy product was "potentially linked" to the deaths of 20 of its consumers.[12][13][14][15]

A 2014 article in the New York Times article reported that 5-hour Energy was lobbying state attorney generals in 30 states after being investigated for deceptive advertising.[16] A 2015 report by the Center for Public Integrity (CPI) said that the attorney general offices in five US states had filed cases against Bhargava’s 5-Hour Energy company for "deceptive marketing practices" and that additional class-action lawsuits were pending in seven states.[17]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "How to Use 5-hour energy shots". 5hourenergy.com. Retrieved July 14, 2009. 
  2. ^ "Frequently Asked Questions About 5-Hour Energy". 5hourenergy.com. Retrieved March 6, 2012. 
  3. ^ a b c "Can 5-Hour Energy kick your afternoon slump?". Consumer Reports. March 2011. 
  4. ^ a b "Manoj Bhargava, richest Indian in US commits 90% earnings to charity". The Economic Times. 10 April 2012. 
  5. ^ "How 5-Hour Energy Got Started". Fundable. 
  6. ^ O'Connor, Clare. "The Mystery Monk Making Billions With 5-Hour Energy". Forbes. Retrieved Feb 8, 2012. 
  7. ^ Bunker. "600 mg a day can lead to nervousness, restlessness, irregular heartbeats and insomnia.". 
  8. ^ O'Connor, Clare (February 8, 2012). "What's In A Bottle Of 5-Hour Energy?". Forbes. 
  9. ^ "The buzz on energy-drink caffeine: Caffeine levels per serving for the 27 products we checked ranged from 6 milligrams to 242 milligrams per serving". Consumer Reports. December 2012. 
  10. ^ Koleva, Gergana (3 August 2010). "Hearts Attack victims spouse sues 5-hour energy maker for wrongful death". dailyfinance.com. Retrieved 30 September 2012. 
  11. ^ "Hassell v. Innovation Ventures, U.S. Dist. Ct. W.Tenn., Case No. 2:10-cv-02557-JPM-cgc" (PDF). lawyersusaonline.com. 2010. Retrieved 13 June 2014. 
  12. ^ Duggan, Daniel (19 February 2012). "Wizard of odds". Crains Detroit. 
  13. ^ Lydia Zuraw, Three States Sue 5-Hour Energy Makers For ‘Deceptive’ Advertising, July 22, 2014, Food Safety News
  14. ^ "First-Onset Seizure After Use of an Energy Drink". ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. Retrieved 30 September 2012. 
  15. ^ Meier, Barry (14 November 2012). "Energy Drink Cited in Death Reports". The New York Times. Retrieved 14 November 2012. 
  16. ^ Eric Lipton (October 28, 2014). "Lobbyists, Bearing Gifts, Pursue Attorneys General". New York Times. 
  17. ^ Ben Wieder (March 26, 2015). "The political kingmaker nobody knows". Center for Public Integrity. 

External links[edit]