516 Amherstia

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516 Amherstia
516Amherstia (Lightcurve Inversion).png
A three-dimensional model of 516 Amherstia based on its light curve.
Discovery
Discovered by Raymond Smith Dugan
Discovery date 20 September 1903
Designations
Named after
Amherst College
1903 MG; 1938 YO
Main belt
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 112.26 yr (41003 d)
Aphelion 3.4103 AU (510.17 Gm)
Perihelion 1.95161 AU (291.957 Gm)
2.68094 AU (401.063 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.27204
4.39 yr (1603.4 d)
17.85 km/s
26.3259°
0° 13m 28.308s / day
Inclination 12.960°
328.839°
257.966°
Earth MOID 0.991649 AU (148.3486 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 1.83826 AU (275.000 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.287
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 73.1 km; 69.84 ± 4.38 km[2]
Mean radius
36.55±0.85 km[1]
Mass (1.43 ± 1.33) × 1018 kg [2] 4.1×1017 kg[citation needed]
Mean density
2.0 g/cm³
Equatorial surface gravity
0.0204 m/s²
Equatorial escape velocity
0.0386 km/s
0.312 d [3]
7.49 h (0.312 d) [1]
0.163–0.173 [4]
0.1627±0.008[1]
Temperature ~167 K
M-type asteroid
8.27

516 Amherstia was the 8th asteroid discovered by Raymond Smith Dugan, and was named after Amherst College, his alma mater. Amherstia is a large M-type asteroid, with an estimated diameter of 73 km. It follows an eccentric orbit between Jupiter and Mars, with an orbital period of 4.39 years.

In 1989, the asteroid was observed from the Collurania-Teramo Observatory, allowing a light curve to be produced that showed an estimated rotation period of 7.49 hours and a brightness variation of 0.25 ± 0.01 in magnitude.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Yeomans, Donald K., "516 Amherstia", JPL Small-Body Database Browser (NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory), retrieved 8 May 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Carry, B. (December 2012), "Density of asteroids", Planetary and Space Science 73, pp. 98–118, arXiv:1203.4336, Bibcode:2012P&SS...73...98C, doi:10.1016/j.pss.2012.03.009.  See Table 1.
  3. ^ 1
  4. ^ 2
  5. ^ Dotto, E.; et al. (June 1992), "M-type asteroids - Rotational properties of 16 objects", Astronomy and Astrophysics Supplement Series 95 (2), pp. 195–211, Bibcode:1992A&AS...95..195D. 

External links[edit]