520s

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Millennium: 1st millennium
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The 520s decade ran from January 1, 520, to December 31, 529.

Events[edit]

520

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Britannia[edit]
Europe[edit]
Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

521[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Arabia[edit]
  • Ma`adikarib Ya`fur becomes king, supported by the Aksumites; he begins a military campaign against the Arabian tribes.

By topic[edit]

Music[edit]
Religion[edit]

522[edit]

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]
Arabia[edit]
  • Dhu Nuwas seizes the throne of the Himyarite Kingdom in Yemen. He attacks the Aksumite garrison at Zafar, capturing the city and burning the churches.
  • Dhū Nuwas moves to Najran, an Aksumite stronghold. After accepting the city's capitulation, he massacres the Christian inhabitants (some sources estimate a death toll up to 20,000).

523[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]
Africa[edit]
Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

524[edit]

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]
Mesoamerica[edit]

525[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Britannia[edit]
Europe[edit]
Africa[edit]
Asia[edit]
  • The Daisan river, tributary of the Euphrates, floods Edessa, and within a couple of hours fills the entire city, except for the highest parts. Eventually the pent-up waters break through the city walls. The Shroud of Turin is allegedly discovered during the rebuilding of the city (see Image of Edessa).

By topic[edit]

Exploration and colonization[edit]
Religion[edit]

526[edit]

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]
Persia[edit]
Middle East[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

527[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
  • April 1 – Emperor Justin I names his nephew Justinian I as co-ruler, as an incurable wound saps his strength.
  • August 1 – Justin I, age 77, dies at Constantinople and is succeeded by Justinian I, who becomes sole emperor.
  • Justinian I reorganises the command structure of the Byzantine army, and fields a small but highly trained army.
  • Justinian I appoints Belisarius to command the Eastern army in Armenia and on the Byzantine-Persian frontier.
Britannia[edit]
Japan[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

528[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

529[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]
Arabia[edit]
Mesoamerica[edit]
Southeast Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Education[edit]
Religion[edit]

Significant people[edit]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "List of Rulers of Korea". www.metmuseum.org. Retrieved 21 April 2019.
  2. ^ Martindale, J. R. (1992). The Prosopography of the Later Roman Empire. Cambridge University Press. pp. 163–164, 748.
  3. ^ Dingledy, Frederick W. (18 August 2016). "The Corpus Juris Civilis: A Guide to Its History and Use". Legal Reference Services Quarterly. Rochester, NY. 35 (4): 231–255. doi:10.1080/0270319X.2016.1239484.
  4. ^ Tucker, Abigail (March 2009). "Endangered Site: Church of the Nativity, Bethlehem". Smithsonian Magazine. Retrieved 29 January 2019.
  5. ^ Amory, Patrick (1997). People and Identity in Ostrogothic Italy, 489-554. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 155–158. ISBN 9780521526357.
  6. ^ Baumstark, Anton (2011). On the Historical Development of the Liturgy. Liturgical Press. p. 117. ISBN 9780814660966.
  7. ^ Tiesler, Vera; Cucina, Andrea (2006). Janaab' Pakal of Palenque: Reconstructing the Life and Death of a Maya Ruler. Tucson, AZ: University of Arizona Press. p. 161. ISBN 9780816525102.
  8. ^ Hall, Daniel George Edward (1981) [1955]. History of South East Asia. London and Basingstoke: Macmillan International Higher Education. p. 35. ISBN 9781349165216.
  9. ^ Blumenthal, Henry J. (1978). "529 and Its Sequel: What Happened to the Academy?". Byzantion. 48 (2): 369–385. JSTOR 44171310.
  10. ^ Johnston, William M.; Renkin, Claire (2000). Encyclopedia of Monasticism: A-L. Chicago: Taylor & Francis. pp. 128–143. ISBN 9781579580902.
  11. ^ Westerfield, David (28 April 2006). "What Was Significant About the Council of Orange?". David Westerfield. Retrieved 2019-01-29.