52872 Okyrhoe

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52872 Okyrhoe
Discovery
Discovered by Spacewatch
Discovery date 19 September 1998
Designations
1998 SG35
centaur[1][2][3]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 5393 days (14.77 yr)
Aphelion 10.908 AU (1.6318 Tm)
Perihelion 5.7875 AU (865.80 Gm)
8.3478 AU (1.24881 Tm)
Eccentricity 0.30670
24.12 yr (8809.66 d)
118.92°
0° 2m 27.11s / day
Inclination 15.665°
173.03°
337.79°
Earth MOID 4.80423 AU (718.703 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 0.468729 AU (70.1209 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 2.945
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 49 km[4]
8.3 h[5]
0.03[6]
10.8[1]

52872 Okyrhoe (/əˈkɪr./; from Greek: Ωκυρόη, Ωκυρρόη) is a centaur orbiting in the outer Solar System between Jupiter and Saturn. It was discovered on September 19, 1998, by Spacewatch.

Orbit[edit]

Centaurs have short dynamical lives due to strong interactions with the giant planets. Okyrhoe (1998 SG35) is estimated to have an orbital half-life of about 670 kiloannum.[7]

Of objects listed as a centaur by the Minor Planet Center (MPC),[3] JPL,[1] and the Deep Ecliptic Survey (DES),[2] Okyrhoe has the second smallest perihelion distance of a numbered centaur. Numbered centaur (315898) 2008 QD4 has a smaller perihelion distance.

52872 Okyrhoe passed perihelion in early 2008 and brightened noticeably.

Sublimation[edit]

Okyrhoe passed perihelion in early 2008,[1] and exhibited important magnitude variations during March and April 2008.[8] This could be a sign of sublimation of volatiles.

Name[edit]

It was named after Ocyrhoe, Greek mythology.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 52872 Okyrhoe (1998 SG35)" (last observation: 2008-06-06). Retrieved 12 April 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Marc W. Buie. "Orbit Fit and Astrometric record for 52872" (last observation: 2008-04-24). SwRI (Space Science Department). Retrieved 2008-10-11. 
  3. ^ a b "List Of Centaurs and Scattered-Disk Objects". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 2008-10-16. 
  4. ^ Wm. Robert Johnston (22 August 2008). "List of Known Trans-Neptunian Objects". Johnston's Archive. Retrieved 2012-05-10. 
  5. ^ Bauer, J. M.; Meech, K. J.; Fernandez, Y. R.; Pittichova, J.; Hainaut, O. R.; Boehnhardt, H.; Delsanti, A. C. (2003). "Physical Survey of 24 Centaurs with Visible Photometry". Icarus 166 (1): 195–211. Bibcode:2003Icar..166..195B. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2003.07.004. 
  6. ^ E. Dotto; M.A. Barucci; C. de Bergh. "Colours and composition of the Centaurs". Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Italy. Retrieved 2008-10-19.  (word format)
  7. ^ Horner, J.; Evans, N.W.; Bailey, M. E. (2004). "Simulations of the Population of Centaurs I: The Bulk Statistics". Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society 354 (3): 798. arXiv:astro-ph/0407400. Bibcode:2004MNRAS.354..798H. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2004.08240.x. 
  8. ^ Trigo-Rodríguez; Melendo; García-Hernández; Davidsson; Sánchez; Rodríguez (2008). "A continuous follow-up of Centaurs, and dormant comets: looking for cometary activity." (PDF). European Planetary Science Congress. Retrieved 2008-10-12. 

External links[edit]