529

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Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
529 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar529
DXXIX
Ab urbe condita1282
Assyrian calendar5279
Balinese saka calendar450–451
Bengali calendar−64
Berber calendar1479
Buddhist calendar1073
Burmese calendar−109
Byzantine calendar6037–6038
Chinese calendar戊申(Earth Monkey)
3225 or 3165
    — to —
己酉年 (Earth Rooster)
3226 or 3166
Coptic calendar245–246
Discordian calendar1695
Ethiopian calendar521–522
Hebrew calendar4289–4290
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat585–586
 - Shaka Samvat450–451
 - Kali Yuga3629–3630
Holocene calendar10529
Iranian calendar93 BP – 92 BP
Islamic calendar96 BH – 95 BH
Javanese calendar416–417
Julian calendar529
DXXIX
Korean calendar2862
Minguo calendar1383 before ROC
民前1383年
Nanakshahi calendar−939
Seleucid era840/841 AG
Thai solar calendar1071–1072
Tibetan calendar阳土猴年
(male Earth-Monkey)
655 or 274 or −498
    — to —
阴土鸡年
(female Earth-Rooster)
656 or 275 or −497

Year 529 (DXXIX) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Decius without colleague (or, less frequently, year 1282 Ab urbe condita). The denomination 529 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

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References[edit]

  1. ^ Dingledy, Frederick W. (August 18, 2016). "The Corpus Juris Civilis: A Guide to Its History and Use". Legal Reference Services Quarterly. Rochester, NY. 35 (4): 231–255. doi:10.1080/0270319X.2016.1239484.
  2. ^ Tucker, Abigail (March 2009). "Endangered Site: Church of the Nativity, Bethlehem". Smithsonian Magazine. Retrieved January 29, 2019.
  3. ^ Amory, Patrick (1997). People and Identity in Ostrogothic Italy, 489-554. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 155–158. ISBN 9780521526357.
  4. ^ Baumstark, Anton (2011). On the Historical Development of the Liturgy. Liturgical Press. p. 117. ISBN 9780814660966.
  5. ^ Tiesler, Vera; Cucina, Andrea (2006). Janaab' Pakal of Palenque: Reconstructing the Life and Death of a Maya Ruler. Tucson, AZ: University of Arizona Press. p. 161. ISBN 9780816525102.
  6. ^ Hall, Daniel George Edward (1981) [1955]. History of South East Asia. London and Basingstoke: Macmillan International Higher Education. p. 35. ISBN 9781349165216.
  7. ^ Blumenthal, Henry J. (1978). "529 and Its Sequel: What Happened to the Academy?". Byzantion. 48 (2): 369–385. JSTOR 44171310.
  8. ^ Johnston, William M.; Renkin, Claire (2000). Encyclopedia of Monasticism: A-L. Chicago: Taylor & Francis. pp. 128–143. ISBN 9781579580902.
  9. ^ Westerfield, David (April 28, 2006). "What Was Significant About the Council of Orange?". David Westerfield. Retrieved January 29, 2019.
  10. ^ Lee, Lily Xiao Hong; Stefanowska, A. D.; Wiles, Sue (2015) [2007]. Biographical Dictionary of Chinese Women: Antiquity Through Sui, 1600 B.C.E. - 618 C.E. Abingdon & New York: Routledge. p. 314. ISBN 9781317475910.
  11. ^ Duruy, Victor (1918). A Short History of France. J. M. Dent. p. 86.
  12. ^ Khoury, Bishop Demetri (2008). A Cloud of Witnesses: Saints and Martyrs from the Holy Land. Bloomington, Indiana: AuthorHouse. p. 256. ISBN 9781434394408.
  13. ^ Knechtges, David R.; Chang, Taiping (2014). Ancient and Early Medieval Chinese Literature (vol.3 & 4): A Reference Guide, Part Three & Four. III. Leiden, Boston: BRILL. p. 1827. ISBN 9789004271852.