55576 Amycus

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Amycus
55576 Amycus.tiff
Orbital diagram (top view)
Discovery [1]
Discovered by NEAT
Discovery site Palomar
Discovery date 8 April 2002
Designations
MPC designation 55576 Amycus
Named after
Amycus
2002 GB10
Centaur[1][2]
Adjectives Amycian
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 2
Observation arc 7204 days (19.72 yr)
Aphelion 35.019 AU (5.2388 Tm) (Q)
Perihelion 15.178 AU (2.2706 Tm) (q)
25.098 AU (3.7546 Tm) (a)
Eccentricity 0.39526 (e)
125.74 yr (45926.7 d)
37.041° (M)
0° 0m 28.219s / day (n)
Inclination 13.352° (i)
315.45° (Ω)
239.17° (ω)
Earth MOID 14.1986 AU (2.12408 Tm)
Jupiter MOID 9.92261 AU (1.484401 Tm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 4.133
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 76.3 ± 12.5 km [3][4]
9.76 h (0.407 d)
~ 0.18 [3]
~ 20 [5]
7.8[1]

55576 Amycus /ˈæmkəs/, provisionally known as 2002 GB10, is a centaur discovered on April 8, 2002, by the NEAT at Palomar.[1]

55576 Amycus was named for Amycus, a male centaur in Greek mythology.

It came to perihelion in February 2003.[1]

Data from the Spitzer Space Telescope gave a diameter of 76.3 ± 12.5 km.[3][4]

A low probability asteroid occultation of star UCAC2 17967364 with an apparent magnitude of +13.8 was possible on February 11, 2009.[6]

Another such event involving a star with an apparent magnitude of +12.9 occurred on 2014 April 10 about 10h 46m Universal Time, visible for observers in the southwest USA and western Mexico.[7]

Near 3:4 resonance of Uranus[edit]

Amycus (2002 GB10) lies within 0.009 AU of the 3:4 resonance of Uranus and is estimated to have a long orbital half-life of about 11.1 Myr.[8]

It has been observed 76 times over 19 years and has an orbit quality code of 2.[1]

The failed libration (resonance motion) of Amycus.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 55576 Amycus (2002 GB10)" (2007-08-15 last obs). Retrieved 12 April 2016. 
  2. ^ Marc W. Buie. "Orbit Fit and Astrometric record for 55576" (2003-06-22 using 73 of 81 observations). SwRI (Space Science Department). Retrieved 2009-02-28. 
  3. ^ a b c John Stansberry; Will Grundy; Mike Brown; Dale Cruikshank; John Spencer; David Trilling; Jean-Luc Margot (2007-02-20). "Physical Properties of Kuiper Belt and Centaur Objects: Constraints from Spitzer Space Telescope". arXiv:astro-ph/0702538free to read [astro-ph]. 
  4. ^ a b Wm. Robert Johnston (22 August 2008). "List of Known Trans-Neptunian Objects". Johnston's Archive. Archived from the original on 13 February 2009. Retrieved 2009-02-28. 
  5. ^ "AstDys (55576) Amycus Ephemerides". Department of Mathematics, University of Pisa, Italy. Retrieved 2009-03-15. 
  6. ^ Steve Preston (2009-01-08). "Star occultation by asteroid 55576 Amycus". IOTA (International Occultation Timing Association). Retrieved 2009-12-28. [dead link]
  7. ^ Hans-J. Bode; Filipe Braga Ribas; B. Sicardy (2013). "Bright Star Occultations by TNOs in 2014. J. Occultation Astronomy 2014-1.". IOTA (International Occultation Timing Association). 
  8. ^ Horner, J.; Evans, N.W.; Bailey, M. E. (2004). "Simulations of the Population of Centaurs I: The Bulk Statistics". arXiv:astro-ph/0407400free to read [astro-ph]. 

External links[edit]