561 BC

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Millennium: 1st millennium BC
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
561 BC in various calendars
Gregorian calendar561 BC
DLX BC
Ab urbe condita193
Ancient Egypt eraXXVI dynasty, 104
- PharaohAmasis II, 10
Ancient Greek era54th Olympiad, year 4
Assyrian calendar4190
Balinese saka calendarN/A
Bengali calendar−1153
Berber calendar390
Buddhist calendar−16
Burmese calendar−1198
Byzantine calendar4948–4949
Chinese calendar己亥(Earth Pig)
2136 or 2076
    — to —
庚子年 (Metal Rat)
2137 or 2077
Coptic calendar−844 – −843
Discordian calendar606
Ethiopian calendar−568 – −567
Hebrew calendar3200–3201
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat−504 – −503
 - Shaka SamvatN/A
 - Kali Yuga2540–2541
Holocene calendar9440
Iranian calendar1182 BP – 1181 BP
Islamic calendar1218 BH – 1217 BH
Javanese calendarN/A
Julian calendarN/A
Korean calendar1773
Minguo calendar2472 before ROC
民前2472年
Nanakshahi calendar−2028
Thai solar calendar−18 – −17
Tibetan calendar阴土猪年
(female Earth-Pig)
−434 or −815 or −1587
    — to —
阳金鼠年
(male Iron-Rat)
−433 or −814 or −1586

The year 561 BC was a year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. In the Roman Empire, it was known as year 193 Ab urbe condita.[1] The denomination 561 BC for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.[2]

Events[edit]

  • Croesus becomes king of Lydia (or 560 BC).[3]
  • All eight solar system planets, including the now redefined dwarf planet Pluto, fall into planetary alignment.[4]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Webster, Noah (1838). N. J. White, ed. "An American dictionary of the English language; exhibiting the origin, orthography, pronunciation, and definitions of words". New York. 
  2. ^ A. E. Redgate. encyklopedia, ed. "Saint Bede". Retrieved 2016-07-16. 
  3. ^ encyclopaedia britannica (ed.). "Croesus King of Lydia". Retrieved 2016-07-16. 
  4. ^ Dave Kornreich (2015-07-01). Cornell, ed. "When was the last time all of the planets were aligned?". Retrieved 2016-07-17. 
  5. ^ encyclopaedia britannica (ed.). "Alyatte II". Retrieved 2016-07-16.