569th Strategic Missile Squadron

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569th Strategic Missile Squadron
Titan 1 ICBM.jpg
First successful launch of an SM-68 Titan I ICBM at Cape Canaveral, Florida on 10 August 1960 at the Atlantic Missile Range
Active 1942-1945; 1962-1965
Country  United States
Branch  United States Air Force
Type Squadron
Role Intercontinental ballistic missile
Garrison/HQ Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho
Engagements European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Streamer.jpg
World War II (EAME Theater)
Decorations Streamer PUC Army.PNG
Distinguished Unit Citation
569th Strategic Missile Squadron emblem 569th Strategic Missile Squadron - SAC - Emblem.png
Douglas/Long Beach B-17G-70-DL Fortress Serial 44-46954 of the 569th Bomb Squadron dropping food over the occupied part of the Netherlands during the first week of May 1945

The 569th Strategic Missile Squadron (567 SMS) is an inactive United States Air Force unit. It was last assigned to the 9th Strategic Aerospace Wing, stationed at Mountain Home AFB, Idaho

On 1 June 1961, the 569th Strategic Missile Squadron (ICBM-Titan) went on alert status as a Strategic Air Command (SAC) Intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) squadron, being equipped with the first-generation SM-68 Titan I, with a mission of nuclear deterrence.

The squadron was inactivated as part of the phaseout of the Titan I ICBM on 31 July 1964


World War II[edit]

Activated in early 1943 as a B-17 Flying Fortress heavy bomber squadron, it trained under the Second Air Force. It deployed to England in the European Theater of Operations (ETO) during July 1943 where it was assigned to VIII Bomber Command as a strategic bombardment squadron. It participated in the air offensive over Nazi Germany and Occupied Europe until the German capitulation in May 1945. Squadron personnel were demobilized in England and returned to the United States; the squadron was reassigned to the Second Air Force and was planned to be re-equipped with B-29 Superfortresses for deployment to the Pacific Theater. The Japanese capitulation led to the units' inactivation in August 1945, being neither manned or equipped.

It was re-activated in the postwar Air Force Reserve as a B-29 squadron in 1947 and inactivated due to budget reductions in 1949.

Intercontinental Ballistic Missile Squadron[edit]

It was re-activated once more in 1961 as a HGM-25A Titan I ICBM launch squadron, the last such activation of a Titan I squadron within the Strategic Air Command. The squadron was deployed in a 3x3 configuration, which meant a total of nine missiles were divided into three bases. Each base had three ICBMs ready to launch at any given time.

On 19 November 1964, Defense Secretary Robert McNamara announced the phasing-out of the remaining first-generation SM-65 Atlas and Titan I missiles by the end of June 1965. Consequently, the Titan Is of the 569th SMS were removed from alert status on 17 February 1965. The last missile was shipped out on 1 April. The US Air Force subsequently inactivated the squadron.

Missile sites were later sold off to private ownership after demilitarization. Today the remains of the sites are still visible in aerial imagery, in various states of use or abandonment.


Emblem of the World War II 569th Bombardment Squadron
  • Constituted as the 569th Bombardment Squadron (Heavy) on 15 January 1943
Activated on 26 January 1943
Inactivated on 28 August 1945
  • Re-designated as the 569th Bombardment Squadron (Very Heavy) on 3 July 1947
Activated in the reserve on 24 June 1947
Inactivated on 27 June 1949
  • Re-designated as the 569th Strategic Missile Squadron and activated on 12 December 1960
Organized on 1 June 1961
Inactivated on 1 April 1965



Aircraft and missiles[edit]

Titan I Missile Sites
  • B-17 Flying Fortress, 1943–1945
  • B-29 Superfortress, 1947–1949
  • SM-68 Titan I Missile 1962-1964
Operated three missile sites: (1 Jun 1961-25 Jun 1965)
569-A, 12 miles SW of Hot Spring, Idaho 42°40′14″N 115°52′02″W / 42.67056°N 115.86722°W / 42.67056; -115.86722 (569-A)
569-B, 7 miles E of Oreana, Idaho 43°03′58″N 116°15′50″W / 43.06611°N 116.26389°W / 43.06611; -116.26389 (569-B)
569-C, 3 miles NE of Orchard, Idaho 43°20′42″N 115°59′33″W / 43.34500°N 115.99250°W / 43.34500; -115.99250 (569-C)

See also[edit]


 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Air Force Historical Research Agency.