57th Technology & Engineering Emmy Awards

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57th Technology & Engineering Emmy Awards
Date 29 September 2005
Location Bristol-Myers Squibb
Princeton, New Jersey
Host Mark Cuban
56th Technology & Engineering
Emmy Awards
58th >

The 57th Technology & Engineering Emmy Awards was held on 29 September 2005. The National Television Academy announced the winners at Bristol-Myers Squibb in Princeton, New Jersey.[1]

Awardees[edit]

  • For slow-motion color recording and playback for broadcast:
  • For pioneering development of locally integrated and branded content using IP Store and forward technology:
  • For the first intercontinental satellite TV transmission:

Video Gaming Technology and Applications[edit]

Emmys were also bestowed for Video Gaming Technology and Applications, for the second year running. The award recognizes pioneering efforts and breakthroughs in the gaming world.[1]

Advanced Media Technology[edit]

The Advanced Media Technology awards honor the work being done in Interactive Television, New Media and related programming and technology. The technologies that are considered in this group embrace the expanded definition of television and include non-linear creation and distribution, point to point delivery, one and two screen television technologies and gaming for television delivery.[1]

  • The winner for Outstanding Achievement in Advanced Media Technology for the Enhancement of Original Television Content is:
  • The winner for Outstanding Achievement in Advanced Media Technology for the Non-Synchronous Enhancement of Original Television Content is:
  • The winner for Outstanding Achievement in Advanced Media Technology for the Creation of Non-Traditional Programs or Platforms is:

Lifetime Achievement Award[edit]

For the first time, the Academy bestowed a Lifetime Achievement Award in the area of Technology and Engineering. Mark Cuban, owner of the Dallas Mavericks and founder of HDnet, presented the award to the original inventors of the videotape recorder: Charlie Ginsburg, Ray Dolby, Alex Maxey, Charlie Anderson, Fred Pfost and Shelby Henderson. The six men, all then working for Ampex, introduced the VR-1000, (later named the Ampex Mark IV) the first practical videotape recorder, to the world on 14 March 1956 at the National Association of Radio and Television Broadcasters convention in Chicago.[1]

References[edit]

External links[edit]