5S (methodology)

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Tools drawer at a 5S working place

5S is the name of a workplace organization method that uses a list of five Japanese words: seiri, seiton, seiso, seiketsu, and shitsuke. Transliterated into English, they all start with the letter "S".[1] The list describes how to organize a work space for efficiency and effectiveness by identifying and storing the items used, maintaining the area and items, and sustaining the new order.[2] The decision-making process usually comes from a dialogue about standardization, which builds understanding among employees of how they should do the work.

The 5 S[edit]

There are five 5S phases: They can be translated from the Japanese as "sort", "set in order", "shine", "standardize", and "sustain". Other translations are possible.

Seiri[edit]

整理 (Sort means eliminating anything that is unnecessary for the equipment to work properly.)[edit]

  • Remove unnecessary items and dispose of them properly.
  • Make work easier by eliminating obstacles.
  • Reduce chance of being disturbed with unnecessary items.
  • Prevent accumulation of unnecessary items.
  • Evaluate necessary items with regard to cost or other factors.
  • Remove all parts not in use.
  • Segregate unwanted material from the workplace.
  • Need fully skilled supervisor for checking on regular basis.
  • Don't put unnecessary items at the workplace & define a red-tagged area to keep those unnecessary items.
  • Waste removal.

Seiton[edit]

整頓 (Set)[edit]

  • Can also be translated as "set in order", "straighten", or "streamline"
  • Arrange all necessary items so they can be easily selected for use
  • Prevent loss and waste of time
  • Make it easy to find and pick up necessary items
  • Ensure first-come-first-served basis
  • Make workflow smooth and easy
  • All above work should be done on regular basis

Seiso[edit]

清掃 (Shine)[edit]

  • Can also be translated as "sweep", "sanitize", or "scrub"
  • Clean your workplace completely
  • Use cleaning as inspection
  • Prevent machinery and equipment deterioration
  • Keep workplace safe and easy to work
  • Keep work place clean and pleasing to work in
  • When in place anyone not familiar to the environment must be able to detect problems in 5 seconds within 50 feet.

Seiketsu[edit]

清潔 (Standardize)[edit]

  • Standardize the best practices in the work area.
  • Maintain high standards and workplace organization at all times.
  • Maintain orderliness. Maintain everything in order and according to its standard.
  • Everything in its right place.
  • Every process has a standard.

Shitsuke[edit]

(Sustain)[edit]

  • To keep in working order
  • Also translates as "do without being told"
  • Perform regular audits
  • Training and Discipline
  • Training is goal oriented process. Its resulting feedback is necessary monthly

The Origins of 5S[edit]

5S was developed in Japan and was identified as one of the techniques that enabled Just in Time manufacturing.[3]

Two major frameworks for understanding and applying 5S to business environments have arisen, one proposed by Osada, the other by Hirano.[4][5] Hirano provided a structure for improvement programs with a series of identifiable steps, each building on its predecessor. As noted by John Bicheno,[6] Toyota's adoption of the Hirano approach was '4S', with Seiton and Seiso combined.

Variety of 5S Applications[edit]

5S methodology has expanded from manufacturing and is now being applied to a wide variety of industries including health care, education, and government.[2] Although the origins of the 5S methodology are in manufacturing, it can also be applied to knowledge-economy work, with information, software, or media in the place of physical product.[7] Examples of companies using 5S methodology are Infineon Technologies and Nonin Medical.[8]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "What Is 5S? - Sort, Set In Order, Shine, Standardize, Sustain". 
  2. ^ a b "5S Comprehensive Education and Resource Center". 
  3. ^ Womack, James; Jones, Daniel; Roos, Daniel (1991). Machine That Changed The World. Productivity Press. ISBN 978-1-84737-055-6. 
  4. ^ Hirano, Hiroyuki (1995). 5 Pillars of the Visual Workplace. Cambridge, MA: Productivity Press. ISBN 978-1-56327-047-5. 
  5. ^ Osada, Takashi (1995). The 5S’s: Five keys to a Total Quality Environment. US: Asian Productivity Organization. ISBN 9283311167. 
  6. ^ Bicheno, John. New Lean Toolbox: Towards Fast, Flexible Flow. Buckingham: PICSIE. ISBN 978-0-9541244-1-0. 
  7. ^ "CEITON – Profile". 
  8. ^ "Manufacturing Storage Case Studies | Lista". www.listaintl.com. Retrieved 2015-09-27.