6-millimeter band

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The 6-millimeter or 47 GHz band is a portion of the EHF (microwave) radio spectrum internationally allocated to amateur radio and amateur satellite use between 47.0 GHz and 47.2 GHz.[1]

Due to the lack of commercial off the shelf radios, amateurs who operate on the 6 mm band must design and construct their own equipment.[2] Amateurs often use the band to experiment with the maximum communication distance they can achieve, and they also use it occasionally for radio contesting.[2] In some areas, amateurs maintain 47 GHz propagation beacons on mountain tops.[2] The band has been successfully used by amateurs in moon bounce contacts.[2][3]

Allocation[edit]

The International Telecommunication Union allocates 47.0 GHz to 47.2 GHz to amateur radio and amateur satellites on a primary basis in all three ITU regions.[1]

It is the only EHF band amateurs do not share with other radio services, and it is the only band above 2 meters which is exclusively for the amateur services in its entirety.[1]

List of notable frequencies[edit]

  • 47.0882 GHz Narrow band calling frequency[4][5]
  • 47.088 GHz Propagation beacons[2]

Distance records[edit]

The current world distance record on the 6 mm band was 344.8 kilometres (214.2 mi) set by US stations AD6FP and W6QIW on September 19, 2015.[6]

The longest distance achieved on 6 mm in the United Kingdom was 203 kilometres (126 mi) between stations GM7MRF / GM0HNW and GW0IVA on October 21, 2001.[3]

In Australia, the 6 mm distance record was 181.2 kilometres (112.6 mi) set by stations VK5KK/3 and VK5ZD/3 on November 14, 2019.[7]

The 6 mm Earth-Moon-Earth record was 9,967 kilometres (6,193 mi) set by stations AD6FP and RW3BP on January 23, 2005.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "FCC Online Table of Frequency Allocations" (PDF). 47 C.F.R. Federal Communications Commission. May 7, 2019. Retrieved August 7, 2019.
  2. ^ a b c d e "UK Amateur Radio in 47GHz" (PDF). Radio Society of Great Britain. August 23, 2016. Retrieved August 7, 2019.
  3. ^ a b c Day, Peter; Qaurmby, John (May 9, 2019). "Microwave Distance Records". UK Microwave Group. Retrieved August 7, 2019.
  4. ^ "VHF Managers Handbook". 7. International Amateur Radio Union Region 1. January 2015. p. 52. Archived from the original (PDF) on June 17, 2018. Retrieved October 27, 2015.
  5. ^ "IARU Region 2 Band Plan" (PDF). International Amateur Radio Union Region 2. October 14, 2016. p. 15.
  6. ^ "Distance Records" (PDF). Amateur Radio Relay League. May 21, 2019. Retrieved August 7, 2019.
  7. ^ "Australian VHF - UHF Records" (PDF). Wireless Institute of Australia. January 23, 2021. Archived (PDF) from the original on July 31, 2021. Retrieved July 31, 2021.

External links[edit]

Range Band ITU Region 1 ITU Region 2 ITU Region 3
LF 2200 m 135.7–137.8 kHz
MF 630 m 472–479 kHz
160 m 1.810–1.850 MHz 1.800–2.000 MHz
HF 80 / 75 m 3.500–3.800 MHz 3.500–4.000 MHz 3.500–3.900 MHz
60 m 5.3515–5.3665 MHz
40 m 7.000–7.200 MHz 7.000–7.300 MHz 7.000–7.200 MHz
30 m[w] 10.100–10.150 MHz
20 m 14.000–14.350 MHz
17 m[w] 18.068–18.168 MHz
15 m 21.000–21.450 MHz
12 m[w] 24.890–24.990 MHz
10 m 28.000–29.700 MHz
VHF 6 m 50.000–52.000 MHz
(50.000–54.000 MHz)[y]
50.000–54.000 MHz
4 m[x] 70.000–70.500 MHz N/A
2 m 144.000–146.000 MHz 144.000–148.000 MHz
1.25 m N/A 220.000–225.000 MHz N/A
UHF 70 cm 430.000–440.000 MHz 430.000–440.000 MHz
(420.000–450.000 MHz)[y]
33 cm N/A 902.000–928.000 MHz N/A
23 cm 1.240–1.300 GHz
13 cm 2.300–2.450 GHz
SHF 9 cm 3.400–3.475 GHz[y] 3.300–3.500 GHz
5 cm 5.650–5.850 GHz 5.650–5.925 GHz 5.650–5.850 GHz
3 cm 10.000–10.500 GHz
1.2 cm 24.000–24.250 GHz
EHF 6 mm 47.000–47.200 GHz
4 mm[y] 75.500 GHz[x] – 81.500 GHz 76.000–81.500 GHz
2.5 mm 122.250–123.000 GHz
2 mm 134.000–141.000 GHz
1 mm 241.000–250.000 GHz
THF Sub-mm Some administrations have authorized spectrum for amateur use in this region;
others have declined to regulate frequencies above 300 GHz.

[v] All allocations are subject to variation by country. For simplicity, only common allocations found internationally are listed. See a band's article for specifics.
[w] HF allocation created at the 1979 World Administrative Radio Conference. These are commonly called the "WARC bands".
[x] This is not mentioned in the ITU's Table of Frequency Allocations, but many individual administrations have commonly adopted this allocation under "Article 4.4".
[y] This includes a currently active footnote allocation mentioned in the ITU's Table of Frequency Allocations. These allocations may only apply to a group of countries.

See also: Radio spectrum, Electromagnetic spectrum