620s

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Millennium: 1st millennium
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Events[edit]

620


By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Britain[edit]
Asia[edit]
America[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

621


By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]
Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]
Technology[edit]
  • The Chinese establish an imperial bureau for the manufacture of porcelain. Their technology will advance further under the Tang Dynasty (approximate date).


622


By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]
  • September 9[5] or June 17[6] – The Islamic prophet Muhammad, after being warned of a plot to assassinate him, secretly leaves his home in Mecca to make the Hegira (emigrate) to Yathrib (later renamed by him Medina), along with his companion Abu Bakr. They take refuge in the Cave of Thawr south of Mecca for three days, departing on September 13 or June 21.
  • September 20[5] or June 28[6] – Muhammad does not enter Yathrib directly, but stops at its outlying environs of Quba. He establishes the Quba Mosque here, the first mosque of Islam. On July 2 (or September 24) he makes his first visit to Yathrib for Friday prayers.
  • October 4[5] or July 13 – After a fourteen days' stay in Quba, Muhammad finally moves from Quba to Yathrib, and is greeted cordially by its people. Here he drafts the Constitution of Medina, an agreement between the various Muslim, Jewish, Christian and pagan tribal communities in the city, forming the basis of a multi-religious Islamic state, and begins construction of the Al-Masjid an-Nabawi Mosque. Later during the caliphate of Umar in 638, the lunar year during which the emigration to Medina occurred (Friday 16 July 622 – 4 July 623) is designated "Year One" of the new Hijri year (Anno Hegirae – AH).
  • Xuanzang is fully ordained as a Buddhist monk at the age of 20.[7]

623


By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]
Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Art[edit]
Religion[edit]


624


By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]
Britain[edit]
Arabia[edit]
Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]


625


By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Britain[edit]
Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]


626

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]
Britain[edit]
Persia[edit]
  • Summer – King Khosrau II plans an all-out effort against Constantinople. He returns to Anatolia with two armies of unknown size, presumably more than 50,000 men each. One of these (possibly commanded by Khosrau himself) is to contain Heraclius in Pontus; another under Shahin Vahmanzadegan is defeated by Theodore.
Asia[edit]

627


By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Britain[edit]
Arabia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]
Education[edit]


628

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
  • Spring – Byzantine–Sassanid War: Emperor Heraclius issues an ultimatum for peace to King Khosrow II, but he refuses his generous terms. The war-weary Persians revolt against Khosrow's regime at Ctesiphon, and install his son Kavadh II on the throne on February 25. He puts his father to death and begins negotiations with Heraclius. Kavadh is forced to return all the territories conquered during the war. The Persians must give up all of the trophies they have captured, including the relic of the True Cross. Evidently there is also a large financial indemnity. Having accepted a peace agreement on his own terms, Heraclius returns in triumph to Constantinople.[26]
  • Third Perso-Turkic War: The Western Göktürks, under their leader Tong Yabghu Qaghan, plunder Tbilisi (modern Georgia). The Persian defenders are executed or mutilated; Tong Yabghu appoints governors (tuduns) to manage various tribes under his overlordship.[27]
Britain[edit]
Persia[edit]
Arabia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Arts and sciences[edit]
Education[edit]
  • The Sharia enjoins women as well as men to obtain secular and religious educations. It forbids eating pork, domesticated donkey, and other flesh denied to Jews by Mosaic law (approximate date).
Religion[edit]
  • Muhammad's letters to world leaders explain the principles of the new monotheistic Muslim faith, as they will be contained in his book, the Quran.


629

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]
Britain[edit]
Arabia[edit]
Asia[edit]
Americas[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]


Significant people[edit]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Early Medieval Balkans: A Critical Survey from the Sixth to the Late Twelfth Century (1991), John V.A. Fine, Jr, p. 36. ISBN 978-0-472-08149-3
  2. ^ The Early Medieval Balkans: A Critical Survey from the Sixth to the Late Twelfth Century (1991), John V.A. Fine, Jr, p. 42. ISBN 978-0472-08149-3
  3. ^ Roger Collins, "Visigothic Spain 409–711", p. 76
  4. ^ Kaegi 2003, p. 116
  5. ^ a b c Shamsi, F. A. (1984). "The Date of Hijrah". Islamic Studies. 23: 189–224, 289–323. 
  6. ^ a b Shaikh, Fazlur Rehman (2001). Chronology of Prophetic Events. London: Ta-Ha Publishers. pp. 51–52. 
  7. ^ Howgego, Raymond John (2003). Encyclopedia of Exploration to 1800. Hordern House. p. 522. ISBN 978-1-875567-36-2. 
  8. ^ Rome at War (AD 293–696), p. 61. Michael Whitby, 2002. ISBN 1-84176-359-4
  9. ^ The Early Medieval Balkans: A Critical Survey from the Sixth to the Late Twelfth Century (1991), John V.A. Fine, Jr, p. 43. ISBN 978-0472-08149-3
  10. ^ Kaegi, Walther Emil (2003), Heraclius, Emperor of Byzantium, Cambridge University Press, p. 127. ISBN 0-521-81459-6
  11. ^ Kaegi, Walther Emil (2003), Heraclius, Emperor of Byzantium, Cambridge University Press, p. 128. ISBN 0-521-81459-6
  12. ^ Kaegi, Walther Emil (2003), Heraclius, Emperor of Byzantium, Cambridge University Press, p. 129. ISBN 0-521-81459-6
  13. ^ Fryde, E.B. (1996), "Handbook of British Chronology" (Third revised ed.). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press, p. 213. ISBN 0-521-56350-X
  14. ^ a b Kaegi, Walter Emil (2003), "Heraclius: Emperor of Byzantium", Cambridge University Press, p. 131. ISBN 0-521-81459-6
  15. ^ The Walls of Constantinople AD 324–1453, p. 47. Stephen Turnbull, 2004. ISBN 978-1-84176-759-8
  16. ^ Bede, H. E. Book II, chapter 9. Bede calls these two islands the Mevanian Islands
  17. ^ Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, Manuscript A (ASC A), 626
  18. ^ Kaegi, Walter Emil (2003), "Heraclius: Emperor of Byzantium", Cambridge University Press, p. 144. ISBN 0-521-81459-6
  19. ^ Kaegi, Walter Emil (2003), "Heraclius: Emperor of Byzantium", Cambridge University Press, p. 167. ISBN 0-521-81459-6
  20. ^ Kaegi, Walter Emil (2003), "Heraclius: Emperor of Byzantium", Cambridge University Press, p. 173. ISBN 0-521-81459-6
  21. ^ Oman, Charles (1893), "Europe, 476–918", Volume 1 (p. 211)
  22. ^ Norwich, John Julius (1997), "A Short History of Byzantium", Vintage Books, p. 93. ISBN 0-679-77269-3
  23. ^ Watt, "Muhammad at Medina", p. 36
  24. ^ Bede, H.E. Volume II, chapter 14
  25. ^ "St. Columbanus". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company (1913)
  26. ^ Kaegi, Walter Emil (2003), Heraclius: Emperor of Byzantium, Cambridge University Press, p. 178, 189–190. ISBN 0-521-81459-6
  27. ^ Christian 283; Artamanov, p. 170–180
  28. ^ The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle
  29. ^ Palmer, Alan & Veronica (1992). The Chronology of British History. London: Century Ltd. pp. 30–34. ISBN 0-7126-5616-2. 
  30. ^ Rodney Aist, "The Christian Topography of Early Islamic Jerusalem", Brepols Publishers (2009), p. 59
  31. ^ Bury 2008, p. 245