6500 Kodaira

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6500 Kodaira
Discovery [1]
Discovered by K. Endate
K. Watanabe
Discovery site Kitami Obs.
Discovery date 15 March 1993
Designations
MPC designation (6500) Kodaira
Named after
Keiichi Kodaira
(astronomer)[2]
1993 ET · 1970 GE1
1973 ST5
Mars-crosser[1][3]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 16 February 2017 (JD 2457800.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 46.16 yr (16,861 days)
Aphelion 3.9035 AU
Perihelion 1.6071 AU
2.7553 AU
Eccentricity 0.4167
4.57 yr (1,670 days)
138.29°
0° 12m 55.8s / day
Inclination 29.322°
186.12°
255.52°
Earth MOID 0.8209 AU
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 9.487±2.081[4]
16.81 km (calculated)[3]
5.3983±0.0026 h[5]
5.3988±0.0002 h[6]
5.400±0.001 h[7]
5.496±0.009 h[8]
0.057 (assumed)[3]
0.151±0.110[4]
SMASS = B[1] · B[3]
12.39±0.21[9] · 12.6[1][3] · 12.640±0.007 (R)[5]

6500 Kodaira, provisional designation 1993 ET, is a dark, rare-type, and eccentric asteroid and Mars-crosser, approximately 10 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 15 March 1993, by Japanese amateur astronomers Kin Endate and Kazuro Watanabe at Kitami Observatory in eastern Hokkaidō, Japan.[10]

The carbonaceous and uncommon B-type asteroid, of which only a few dozen bodies are currently known,[11] orbits the Sun at a distance of 1.6–3.9 AU once every 4 years and 7 months (1,670 days). Its orbit spans from within the orbit of Mars to the outer region of the asteroid belt, and has an eccentricity of 0.42 and an inclination of 29° with respect to the ecliptic.[1] The first precovery was obtained at the Chilean Cerro El Roble Station in 1970, extending the asteroid's observation arc by 23 years prior to its discovery.[10]

A rotational light-curve, obtained from photometric observations by American astronomer Robert Stevens at the Center for Solar System Studies in October 2014, gave a well-define rotation period of 5.400±0.001 hours with a brightness variation of 0.78 in magnitude (U=3).[7] Previous observations at Montgomery College Observatory (MCO), the Preston Gott and McDonald Observatories, and at the Palomar Transient Factory gave similar periods between 5.398 and 5.496 hours (U=3-/3-/2).[8][6][5]

According to first-year results from the NEOWISE mission of NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, the asteroid measures 9.5 kilometers in diameter and its surface has an albedo of 0.15,[4] while the Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link assumes a low albedo of 0.057 and calculates a diameter of 16.8 kilometers.[3]

The minor planet was named after Japanese astronomer and director of NAOJ, Keiichi Kodaira (b. 1937), whose interests lie in astrophysics and galactic physics. In the 1980s, he was head of IAU's commission of Theory of Stellar Atmospheres (comm. 36). He was also instrumental for the completion of the Subaru Telescope project, of which he was the scientific director since its inception.[2] Naming citation was published on 1 June 1996 (M.P.C. 27331).[12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 6500 Kodaira (1993 ET)" (2016-06-09 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 5 December 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (6500) Kodaira. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 537. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 2 May 2016. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f "LCDB Data for (6500) Kodaira". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 2 May 2016. 
  4. ^ a b c Nugent, C. R.; Mainzer, A.; Masiero, J.; Bauer, J.; Cutri, R. M.; Grav, T.; et al. (December 2015). "NEOWISE Reactivation Mission Year One: Preliminary Asteroid Diameters and Albedos". The Astrophysical Journal. 814 (2): 13. arXiv:1509.02522Freely accessible. Bibcode:2015ApJ...814..117N. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/814/2/117. Retrieved 26 October 2016. 
  5. ^ a b c Waszczak, Adam; Chang, Chan-Kao; Ofek, Eran O.; Laher, Russ; Masci, Frank; Levitan, David; et al. (September 2015). "Asteroid Light Curves from the Palomar Transient Factory Survey: Rotation Periods and Phase Functions from Sparse Photometry". The Astronomical Journal. 150 (3): 35. arXiv:1504.04041Freely accessible. Bibcode:2015AJ....150...75W. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/150/3/75. Retrieved 2 May 2016. 
  6. ^ a b Clark, Maurice (October 2011). "Asteroid Lightcurves from the Preston Gott and McDonald Observatories". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 38 (4): 187–189. Bibcode:2011MPBu...38..187C. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 2 May 2016. 
  7. ^ a b Stephens, Robert D. (April 2015). "Asteroids Observed from CS3: 2014 October - December". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 42 (2): 104–106. Bibcode:2015MPBu...42..104S. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 2 May 2016. 
  8. ^ a b Clark, Maurice (March 2007). "Lightcurve Results for 1318 Nerina, 222 Lermontov 3015 Candy, 3089 Oujianquan, 3155 Lee, 6410 Fujiwara, 6500 Kodaira, (8290) 1992 NP, 9566 Rykhlova, (42923) 1999 SR18, and 2001 FY". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 34 (1): 19–22. Bibcode:2007MPBu...34...19C. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 2 May 2016. 
  9. ^ Veres, Peter; Jedicke, Robert; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Denneau, Larry; Granvik, Mikael; Bolin, Bryce; et al. (November 2015). "Absolute magnitudes and slope parameters for 250,000 asteroids observed by Pan-STARRS PS1 - Preliminary results". Icarus. 261: 34–47. arXiv:1506.00762Freely accessible. Bibcode:2015Icar..261...34V. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2015.08.007. Retrieved 2 May 2016. 
  10. ^ a b "6500 Kodaira (1993 ET)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 2 May 2016. 
  11. ^ "JPL Small-Body Database Search Engine: spec. type: B (SMASSII)". JPL Solar System Dynamics. Retrieved 1 January 2006. 
  12. ^ "MPC/MPO/MPS Archive". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 2 May 2016. 

External links[edit]