676

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Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
676 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 676
DCLXXVI
Ab urbe condita 1429
Armenian calendar 125
ԹՎ ՃԻԵ
Assyrian calendar 5426
Balinese saka calendar 597–598
Bengali calendar 83
Berber calendar 1626
Buddhist calendar 1220
Burmese calendar 38
Byzantine calendar 6184–6185
Chinese calendar 乙亥(Wood Pig)
3372 or 3312
    — to —
丙子年 (Fire Rat)
3373 or 3313
Coptic calendar 392–393
Discordian calendar 1842
Ethiopian calendar 668–669
Hebrew calendar 4436–4437
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 732–733
 - Shaka Samvat 597–598
 - Kali Yuga 3776–3777
Holocene calendar 10676
Iranian calendar 54–55
Islamic calendar 56–57
Japanese calendar N/A
Javanese calendar 568–569
Julian calendar 676
DCLXXVI
Korean calendar 3009
Minguo calendar 1236 before ROC
民前1236年
Nanakshahi calendar −792
Seleucid era 987/988 AG
Thai solar calendar 1218–1219
Tibetan calendar 阴木猪年
(female Wood-Pig)
802 or 421 or −351
    — to —
阳火鼠年
(male Fire-Rat)
803 or 422 or −350
King Dagobert II of Austrasia (c. 650–679)

Year 676 (DCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. The denomination 676 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Events[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]

Europe[edit]

Britain[edit]

Asia[edit]

  • Emperor Tenmu of Japan promulgates a decree about taxes from fiefs, and the employment of persons for the service from the outer provinces. Men of distinguished ability are allowed to enter the service, even though they are of the common people, regardless of their ranks.
  • The broad-based peninsular effort under Silla's leadership, to prevent Chinese domination of Korea, succeeds in forcing Chinese troops to withdraw into Manchuria, in northeast China.

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]


Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Treadgold (1997), p. 326
  2. ^ Bede, "Ecclesiastical History", chapter IV, p. 223