683 Lanzia

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683 Lanzia
683Lanzia (Lightcurve Inversion).png
A three-dimensional model of 683 Lanzia based on its light curve.
Discovery
Discovered by Max Wolf
Discovery site Heidelberg
Discovery date 23 July 1909
Designations
1909 HC
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 101.75 yr (37164 d)
Aphelion 3.2891 AU (492.04 Gm)
Perihelion 2.9402 AU (439.85 Gm)
3.1146 AU (465.94 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.056013
5.50 yr (2007.7 d)
278.966°
0° 10m 45.516s / day
Inclination 18.509°
259.724°
283.703°
Earth MOID 1.99431 AU (298.345 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 1.88702 AU (282.294 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.136
Physical characteristics
Mean radius
41.52±11.1 km
8.630 h (0.3596 d)
0.1474±0.128
8.7

683 Lanzia is a minor planet orbiting the Sun. It was discovered July 23, 1909 by Max Wolf at the Landessternwarte Heidelberg-Königstuhl observatory[2] and was named after the fungus Lanzia. Photometric observations made in 2003 at the Santana Observatory in Rancho Cucamonga, California give a synodic rotation period of 8.63 ± 0.005 hours. The light curve shows a brightness variation of 0.15 ± 0.04 in magnitude.[2]

Observations during two last occultation 18 and 22 December 2010 (P.Baruffetti, G. Tonlorenzi - Massa, G. Bonatti - Carrara, R. Di Luca - Bologna (Italy), C. Schnabel - S. Estebe, J. Rovira - Moja (Spain)) mesured a 122.5 km diameter (medium) and an Albedo of 0.0705 compatible with carbonaced asteroids (C group).

References[edit]

  1. ^ "683 Lanzia (1909 HC)". JPL Small-Body Database. NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 5 May 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Stephens, Robert D. (March 2004), "Photometry of 683 Lanzia, 1101 Clematis, 1499 Pori, 1507 Vaasa, and 3893 DeLaeter", The Minor Planet Bulletin, 31 (1), pp. 4–6, Bibcode:2004MPBu...31....4S. 

External links[edit]