709

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Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
709 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar709
DCCIX
Ab urbe condita1462
Armenian calendar158
ԹՎ ՃԾԸ
Assyrian calendar5459
Balinese saka calendar630–631
Bengali calendar116
Berber calendar1659
Buddhist calendar1253
Burmese calendar71
Byzantine calendar6217–6218
Chinese calendar戊申(Earth Monkey)
3405 or 3345
    — to —
己酉年 (Earth Rooster)
3406 or 3346
Coptic calendar425–426
Discordian calendar1875
Ethiopian calendar701–702
Hebrew calendar4469–4470
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat765–766
 - Shaka Samvat630–631
 - Kali Yuga3809–3810
Holocene calendar10709
Iranian calendar87–88
Islamic calendar90–91
Japanese calendarWadō 2
(和銅2年)
Javanese calendar602–603
Julian calendar709
DCCIX
Korean calendar3042
Minguo calendar1203 before ROC
民前1203年
Nanakshahi calendar−759
Seleucid era1020/1021 AG
Thai solar calendar1251–1252
Tibetan calendar阳土猴年
(male Earth-Monkey)
835 or 454 or −318
    — to —
阴土鸡年
(female Earth-Rooster)
836 or 455 or −317

Year 709 (DCCIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. The denomination 709 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Events[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]

Britain[edit]

Arabian Empire[edit]

By topic[edit]

Architecture, real estate[edit]

Environmental change[edit]

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Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Venning, Timothy, ed. (2006). A Chronology of the Byzantine Empire. Palgrave Macmillan. pp. 191–192. ISBN 1-4039-1774-4.
  2. ^ Treadgold, Warren T. (1997), A History of the Byzantine State and Society, Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, p. 938, ISBN 0-8047-2630-2
  3. ^ Treadgold, Warren T. (1997), A History of the Byzantine State and Society, Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, p. 341, ISBN 0-8047-2630-2