712

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Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
712 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar712
DCCXII
Ab urbe condita1465
Armenian calendar161
ԹՎ ՃԿԱ
Assyrian calendar5462
Balinese saka calendar633–634
Bengali calendar119
Berber calendar1662
Buddhist calendar1256
Burmese calendar74
Byzantine calendar6220–6221
Chinese calendar辛亥(Metal Pig)
3408 or 3348
    — to —
壬子年 (Water Rat)
3409 or 3349
Coptic calendar428–429
Discordian calendar1878
Ethiopian calendar704–705
Hebrew calendar4472–4473
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat768–769
 - Shaka Samvat633–634
 - Kali Yuga3812–3813
Holocene calendar10712
Iranian calendar90–91
Islamic calendar93–94
Japanese calendarWadō 5
(和銅5年)
Javanese calendar605–606
Julian calendar712
DCCXII
Korean calendar3045
Minguo calendar1200 before ROC
民前1200年
Nanakshahi calendar−756
Seleucid era1023/1024 AG
Thai solar calendar1254–1255
Tibetan calendar阴金猪年
(female Iron-Pig)
838 or 457 or −315
    — to —
阳水鼠年
(male Water-Rat)
839 or 458 or −314
King Liutprand of the Lombards

Year 712 (DCCXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. The denomination 712 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Events[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]

Europe[edit]

  • February – King Ansprand dies, and is succeeded by his son Liutprand as ruler of the Lombards. During his reign, Liutprand becomes the greatest of the Lombard Kings. Coins and documents from his court at Pavia confirm the impression of a strong and effective monarch.[1]

Arabian Empire[edit]

Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Literature[edit]

  • The Kojiki (Record of Ancient Times) a history of Japan, is completed.


Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Lombard (people), Encyclopædia Britannica
  2. ^ Spencer C. Tucker (2010). A Global Chronology of Conflict: From the Ancient World to the Modern Middle (p. 208). ISBN 978-1-85109-667-1