724 Hapag

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724 Hapag
Discovery [1]
Discovered by J. Palisa
Discovery site Vienna Obs.
Discovery date 21 October 1911
Designations
MPC designation 724
1911 NC, 1988 VG2
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 104.39 yr (38129 d)
Aphelion 3.0675 AU (458.89 Gm)
Perihelion 1.8441 AU (275.87 Gm)
2.4558 AU (367.38 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.24908
3.85 yr (1405.7 d)
73.788°
0° 15m 21.96s / day
Inclination 11.707°
204.27°
205.50°
Earth MOID 0.858673 AU (128.4557 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 2.35451 AU (352.230 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.422
Physical characteristics
3.1305 h (0.13044 d)[1][2]
13.9[1]

724 Hapag is a minor planet orbiting the Sun in the asteroid belt[3] that was found by Austrian astronomer Johann Palisa in 1911.[3] It was assigned a provisional name of 1911 NC, then became a lost asteroid until it was rediscovered in 1988 as 1988 VG2 by T. Hioki and N. Kawasato at Okutama, Japan.[4]

Photometric observations of this asteroid at the Organ Mesa Observatory in Las Cruces, New Mexico in 2011 gave a light curve with a period of 3.1305 ± 0.0001 hours and a brightness variation of 0.11 ± 0.01 in magnitude.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 724 Hapag (1911 NC)" (2015-08-22 last obs). Retrieved 5 May 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Pilcher, Frederick (April 2012), "Rotation Period Determinations for 31 Euphrosyne, 65 Cybele, 154 Bertha 177 Irma, 200 Dynamene, 724 Hapag, 880 Herba, and 1470 Carla", The Minor Planet Bulletin, 39 (2), pp. 57–60, Bibcode:2012MPBu...39...57P. 
  3. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (1997). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names. Springer Science+Business Media. p. 70. 
  4. ^ Nakano, S.; et al. (1988), Green, D. W. E., ed., "(724) Hapag = 1988 VG2", IAU Circular (4676), p. 1, Bibcode:1988IAUC.4676....1N. 

External links[edit]