73rd Tony Awards

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73rd Tony Awards
73rd Tony Awards poster.jpeg
Official poster
DateJune 9, 2019
LocationRadio City Music Hall, New York, New York
Hosted byJames Corden
Most awardsHadestown (8)
Most nominationsHadestown (14)
Websitetonyawards.com
Television/radio coverage
NetworkCBS
Viewership5.4 million[1]
Produced byJames Corden
Ricky Kirshner
Glenn Weiss
Ben Winston
Directed byGlenn Weiss

The 73rd Annual Tony Awards were held on June 9, 2019, to recognize achievement in Broadway productions during the 2018–19 season. The ceremony was held at Radio City Music Hall in New York City and was broadcast live by CBS.[2] James Corden served as host.[3]

Hadestown was the most winning production of the season, with eight awards, including Best Musical. The Ferryman won four awards, including Best Play. Original musicals The Cher Show and Tootsie, the revival of Rodgers and Hammerstein's Oklahoma!, and the new play Ink each won two awards.

The ceremony received mixed reviews, with some criticizing the performance of Corden as host.

Eligibility[edit]

The official eligibility cut-off date for Broadway productions opening in the 2018–2019 season was April 25, 2019.[2][4][5]

Events[edit]

Nominations[edit]

The Tony Award nominations were announced on April 30, 2019 by Bebe Neuwirth and Brandon Victor Dixon and broadcast on CBS.[6]

Hadestown received 14 nominations, the most of any production of the season. Ain’t Too Proud followed, with 12 nominations. The plays The Ferryman and To Kill a Mockingbird each received nine nominations.[7]

Other events[edit]

The annual Meet the Nominees Press Reception took place on May 1, 2019 at the Sofitel New York Hotel.[8] The annual Nominees Luncheon took place on May 21, 2019 at the Rainbow Room. A cocktail party was held on June 3, 2019 at the Sofitel New York Hotel to celebrate the season's Tony Honors for Excellence in the Theatre and Special Award recipients.[9][10]

Creative Arts Awards[edit]

The Creative Arts Tony Awards ceremony was presented prior to the televised award ceremony. The hosts included: Danny Burstein, Karen Olivo and Aaron Tveit. The awards presented include honorary awards and technical categories.[11]

Ceremony[edit]

Presenters[edit]

The ceremony's presenters included:[12][13]

Performances[edit]

The following shows and performers performed on the ceremony's telecast:[14][15]

The playwrights of the nominated plays spoke of their work. As noted by The Hollywood Reporter "Presenting the play nominees has always been the telecast's biggest challenge, and having the writers themselves take the stage to discuss the genesis and themes of their work felt particularly appropriate in such an uncommonly strong season for new plays. It helped that they were so entertaining."[16] The playwrights included James Graham (Ink), Jez Butterworth (The Ferryman), Tarell Alvin McCraney (Choir Boy), Taylor Mac (Gary: A Sequel to Titus Andronicus) and Heidi Schreck (What the Constitution Means to Me).[17]

Broadway Karaoke[edit]

During the broadcast’s commercial breaks, Corden started Broadway Karaoke whereby Broadway performers in the audience would karaoke a show tune without preplanning or rehearsal.[18] Equipped with a songbook, microphone, and with a pianist to accompany, Corden would pick various stars to sing during three of the telecast commercials.[18] Although the performances weren’t broadcast, audience members and Corden’s own film crew recorded the proceedings with some videos being posted online.[19] Corden, whose own late-night show has a successful and similar ongoing segment, Carpool Karaoke, which led to television’s Carpool Karaoke: The Series, revealed the scheme on his show the following night of the Tonys.[18]

The first of three karaokes was Dear Evan Hansen‘s Ben Platt who sang “Tomorrow” from Annie.[20] During the next karaoke break was a performance of “96,000” from In the Heights by the upcoming film's Anthony Ramos who plays Usnavi, who was soon duetting with Christopher Jackson, who originated the role of Benny.[21] The third performance was a “showstopper” shared by Corden on his show the next night, weaving online videos as well as from his own crew.[19] Toward the end of the show he approached Pose’s Billy Porter, who garnered media attention for his red and pink haute couture gown upcycled from Kinky Boots curtains, to deliver what Corden said was an incredible performance of “Everything's Coming up Roses“ from Gypsy,[19] which got a standing ovation from the roughly 6,000 attendees.[22]

Non-competitive awards[edit]

The non-competitive Special Tony Award is presented to Rosemary Harris, Terrence McNally and Harold Wheeler for Lifetime Achievement in the Theatre.[23]

The Isabelle Stevenson Award recipient is Judith Light, for her work to end HIV/AIDS and support for LGBTQ+ and human rights.[24]

The Excellence In Theatre Education Award recipient was Madeleine Michel, Of Monticello High School in Charlottesville, Virginia.

The Regional Theatre Tony Award winner is TheatreWorks (Silicon Valley), Palo Alto, California.[25]

The Tony Honors for Excellence in Theatre is awarded to Broadway Inspirational Voices; Peter Entin, retired vice president of Theatre Operations for the Shubert Organization; Joseph Blakely Forbes, founder and president of Scenic Art Studios, Inc.; and FDNY Engine 54, Ladder 4, Battalion 9 (firehouse, New York City).[26]

The Special Tony Award is presented to the late Marin Mazzie; music director Jason Michael Webb; Sonny Tilders and Creature Technology Company, creator of the gorilla in King Kong among others.[27]

Winners and nominees[edit]

Best Play Best Musical
Best Revival of a Play Best Revival of a Musical
Best Performance by a Leading Actor in a Play Best Performance by a Leading Actress in a Play
Best Performance by a Leading Actor in a Musical Best Performance by a Leading Actress in a Musical
Best Performance by a Featured Actor in a Play Best Performance by a Featured Actress in a Play
Best Performance by a Featured Actor in a Musical Best Performance by a Featured Actress in a Musical
Best Direction of a Play Best Direction of a Musical
Best Book of a Musical Best Original Score (Music and/or Lyrics) Written for the Theatre
Best Scenic Design of a Play Best Scenic Design of a Musical
Best Costume Design of a Play Best Costume Design of a Musical
Best Lighting Design of a Play Best Lighting Design of a Musical
Best Sound Design of a Play Best Sound Design of a Musical
Best Choreography Best Orchestrations

‡ The award is presented to the producer(s) of the musical or play.

Nominations and awards per production[edit]

Production Nominations Awards
Hadestown 14 8
Ain’t Too Proud 12 1
Tootsie 11 2
The Ferryman 9 4
To Kill a Mockingbird 1
Oklahoma! 8 2
Beetlejuice 0
Gary: A Sequel to Titus Andronicus 7 0
The Prom
Ink 6 2
Network 5 1
Choir Boy 4 1
Kiss Me, Kate 0
The Cher Show 3 2
All My Sons 0
Burn This
King Kong
The Boys in the Band 2 1
The Waverly Gallery
Bernhardt/Hamlet 0
Torch Song
What the Constitution Means to Me
Be More Chill 1 0
Hillary and Clinton
King Lear

Individuals with multiple nominations and awards[edit]

Individual Nominations Awards
Rob Howell 2 2
Anaïs Mitchell 1
Chad Beguelin 0
Peter Hylenski
William Ivey Long
Peter Mumford
Peter Nigrini
Jeremy Pope
Ann Roth
Heidi Schreck
Jan Versweyveld

Reception[edit]

The show received a mixed reception from many media publications. On Metacritic, the ceremony has a weighted average score of 46 out of 100, based 6 6 reviews, indicating "mixed or average reviews".[28] The Hollywood Reporter columnist David Rooney remarked, "The host started strong and had one sharp musical interlude mid-show, but elsewhere delivered strained comedy bits that felt familiar, safe and thematically generic."[16] The New York Times theatre critic Mike Hale commented, "But after his verbal dexterity enlivened an overcrowded and bland opening number that did little to showcase the season’s musicals, the material continually failed him, whether it was a tortured audience-participation gag about putting on a loser’s face for the cameras, or a tortured audience-participation gag about generating some rap-style beefs between Broadway stars."[29] Daniel D'Addario from Variety wrote, "The quality of showmanship — the simple sense of taking joy in a production having been brought across well — seemed painfully absent from a broadcast that has little other reason to exist. Many, many people who watch the Tonys never have seen and never will see a nominated show in Manhattan; for that audience, a production brought off well before the cameras is the ceremony’s point vastly more than is a list of winners."[30]

In addition, Caroline Siede from The A.V. Club gave the show a B-, expanding in her review, "All in all, this was a mostly satisfying, if not completely exhilarating year for the Tonys. I’ll remember the winners and I’ll remember some of the musical performances, but I doubt I’ll remember James Corden's opening number in the way I still do with Neil Patrick Harris’ “Bigger” or last year’s Sara Bareilles and Josh Groban's tribute to losers."[31] New York Post critic Michael Riedel wrote, "As for Corden, this was not his finest hour. The opening number, written especially for the telecast, was a dud, and he seemed a bit tired throughout the evening. There was a skit where he had Broadway actors dissing each other, and I can only hope he did not have script approval on that one."[32] Theatre critic Charles McNulty of the Los Angeles Times remarked, "James Corden sprinkled in crowd-pleasing pokes at annoying audience members’ phones ringing during shows, how expensive Broadway tickets have become and how low the industry’s paychecks and the CBS telecast’s ratings tend to be."[33]

Be More Chill parody[edit]

Of the seven nominated musicals, Be More Chill was the only one to not have a performance on the telecast, despite sources close to the show saying that the production had asked to perform on the telecast, and even pay the production costs to do so, but were almost immediately turned down. Instead, Corden, with Josh Groban and Sara Bareilles, performed a parody of one the show's most popular songs, "Michael in the Bathroom", with no direct acknowledgement to the show or the song. Joe Iconis, the show's composer and sole nominee, revealed on Twitter that he was not aware of that the parody prior to the ceremony. Though he did praise it for giving the show exposure on a large scale, he encouraged followers and fans to spread the word about the show and share credit for the song with George Salazar, who performs the song in the show, and Charlie Rosen, who provides the orchestrations for the show.[34] Some viewers and critics, as wells as those involved in Be More Chill's Broadway production, were critical of the telecast for not crediting Be More Chill, the song, Salazar, or Iconis for providing the inspiration, with Riedel noting that viewers who were unaware of Be More Chill would likely be confused at the parody. Riedel also noted a speech from Broadway League chief Charlotte St. Martin about the importance of getting young people to the theater, while the ceremony almost entirely ignored Be More Chill, a show about teenagers and whose target audience was mostly teenagers. The day after the ceremony, both Corden and Groban took to Twitter to give credit the show, Salazar, and Iconis, both having apparently been "mortified" that credit wasn't given. In a comment to The New York Post, St. Martin said, "We regret that there wasn’t an acknowledgment for the Tony-nominated Joe Iconis and the number from the show. We are doing everything we can to rectify [the situation]."[35] CBS's Facebook post of the number was later revised to credit Iconis and Be More Chill as the parody's source.

Ratings[edit]

The ceremony averaged a Nielsen 4.3 ratings/8 share,[36] and was watched by 5.4 million viewers.[37] The ratings was a 10 percent decrease from previous ceremony's viewership of 6.3 million, becoming the lowest in its entire history.[38]

In Memoriam[edit]

Broadway actor Cynthia Erivo performed "Can You Feel the Love Tonight" from The Lion King as images of theatre personalities who died in the past year were shown in the following order.[39]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Patten, Dominic (June 10, 2019). "Tony Awards Ratings Stumble As Stanley Cup Scores For NBC & Boston Bruins". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved June 10, 2019.
  2. ^ a b "Date Set for the 2019 Tony Awards: June 9 on CBS". TonyAwards.com. 2018-10-17. Retrieved 2018-10-20.
  3. ^ McPhee, Ryan. "James Corden to Host 2019 Tony Awards" playbill, March 19, 2019
  4. ^ "Tony Awards Eligibility for 2019 Part 1". TonyAwards.com. 2018-10-18. Retrieved 2018-10-20.
  5. ^ "Tony Awards Eligibility for 2019 Part 2". TonyAwards.com. 2019-01-24. Retrieved 2019-01-24.
  6. ^ McPhee, Ryan. "Bebe Neuwirth and Brandon Victor Dixon to Announce 2019 Tony Award Nominations" Playbill, March 21, 2019
  7. ^ McPhee, Ryan. "2019 Tony Award Nominations: 'Hadestown' and 'Ain't Too Proud' Lead the Pack" Playbill, April 30, 2019
  8. ^ Skethway, Nathan. "Meet the 2019 Tony Award Nominees" Playbill, May 1, 2019
  9. ^ "Tony Awards Calendar" tonyawards.com, retrieved April 30, 2019
  10. ^ Franklin, Marc J."Cheers to the 2019 Tony Awards: Inside the Honors Cocktail Party" Playbill, June 4, 2019
  11. ^ McPhee, Ryan. "Moulin Rouge!'s Aaron Tveit, Karen Olivo, and Danny Burstein to Co-Host 2019 Creative Arts Tony Awards" Playbill, June 5, 2019
  12. ^ Evans, Greg (May 30, 2019). "Darren Criss, Tina Fey, Regina King Among First Round Of Presenters For James Corden-Hosted Tony Awards". Deadline Hollywood. Penske Media Corporation. Retrieved May 30, 2019.
  13. ^ Kinane, Ruth (June 5, 2019). "Sara Bareilles, Kristin Chenoweth and Jake Gyllenhaal added to list of 2019 Tony Awards presenters". Entertainment Weekly. Meredith Corporation. Retrieved June 5, 2019.
  14. ^ McPhee, Ryan (June 6, 2019). "Oklahoma!, Beetlejuice, Hadestown, The Cher Show, More Confirmed to Perform at 2019 Tony Awards". Playbill. TotalTheater. Retrieved June 6, 2019.
  15. ^ Ginsberg, Gab (June 9, 2019). "James Corden Kicks Off the 2019 Tony Awards With Ambitious Opening Number". Billboard. Billboard-Hollywood Media Group. Retrieved June 9, 2019.
  16. ^ a b Rooney, David (June 9, 2019). "The 73rd Annual Tony Awards: TV Review". The Hollywood Reporter. Archived from the original on June 10, 2019. Retrieved June 10, 2019.
  17. ^ " 'Ink' Playwright James Graham Shares Gratitude At The 2019 Tony Awards" msn.com (CBS), retrieved June 10, 2019
  18. ^ a b c "Watch The Late Late Show with James Corden: Tonys Bonus - Billy Porter Crushes Broadway Karaoke - Full show on CBS All Access". www.cbs.com. Retrieved 2019-06-13.
  19. ^ a b c Desta, Yohana. "Watch Billy Porter Bring the House Down With "Everything's Coming Up Roses"". HWD. Retrieved 2019-06-12.
  20. ^ Duboff, Josh. "The Most Surprising Performance at the Tony Awards Wasn't on TV". Vanities. Retrieved 2019-06-12.
  21. ^ "Billy Porter Took the Tonys Stage During a Commercial Break and Sang Gypsy". Vulture. Retrieved 2019-06-12.
  22. ^ "Watch Billy Porter belt out 'Gypsy' for James Corden during unaired Tonys moment". EW.com. 2019-06-11. Retrieved 2019-06-12.
  23. ^ McPhee, Ryan. "Terrence McNally, Rosemary Harris, and Harold Wheeler to Receive Honorary 2019 Tony Awards" Playbill, April 25, 2019
  24. ^ McPhee, Ryan. "Judith Light to Receive Tony Awards' 2019 Isabelle Stevenson Award" Playbill, April 26, 2019
  25. ^ McPhee, Ryan. "TheatreWorks Silicon Valley to Receive 2019 Regional Theatre Tony Award" Playbill, April 28, 2019
  26. ^ Gans, Andrew. "Broadway Inspirational Voices, Peter Entin, Joseph Blakely Forbes, and FDNY Engine 54 Will Receive 2019 Tony Honors" Playbill, April 29, 2019
  27. ^ McPhee, Ryan. "Marin Mazzie, Jason Michael Webb, and King Kong Designer Sonny Tilders to Receive 2019 Special Tony Awards" Playbill, April 29, 2019
  28. ^ "The Tony Awards: Season 73". Metacritic. Retrieved June 11, 2019.
  29. ^ Hale, Mike (June 9, 2019). "Review: As Broadway Gets Bigger, the Tonys Get Blander". The New York Times. Archived from the original on June 10, 2019. Retrieved June 10, 2019.
  30. ^ D'Addario, Daniel (June 9, 2019). "TV Review: '73rd Annual Tony Awards'". Variety. Archived from the original on June 10, 2019. Retrieved June 10, 2019.
  31. ^ Siede, Caroline (June 10, 2019). "A pleasant but bland Tonys gets the awards part right". The A.V. Club. Archived from the original on June 10, 2019.
  32. ^ Riedel, Michael (June 10, 2019). "Tony Awards offered little surprise, a lackluster James Corden". New York Post. Archived from the original on June 11, 2019. Retrieved June 11, 2019.
  33. ^ Gelt, Jessica (June 10, 2019). "Tony winners: 'Hadestown' racks up 8 awards including best musical — and women make history". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on June 11, 2019. Retrieved June 10, 2019.
  34. ^ Iconis, Joe (2019-06-10). "#BeMoreChill #MichaelInTheBathroom @BeMoreChill @georgesalazar @CRosenMusicpic.twitter.com/9bRIdzaHib". @MrJoeIconis. Retrieved 2019-06-15. line feed character in |title= at position 36 (help)
  35. ^ Riedel, Michael (2019-06-13). "'Be More Chill' didn't deserve face slap from Tony Awards". New York Post. Retrieved 2019-06-15.
  36. ^ Thorne, Will (June 10, 2019). "TV Ratings: Tony Awards Hit Five-Year Low". Variety. Retrieved June 10, 2019.
  37. ^ Clement, Olivia (June 10, 2019). "Tony Awards Ratings: Numbers are Down for 2019 Ceremony". Playbill. Retrieved June 10, 2019.
  38. ^ Porter, Rick (June 10, 2019). "TV Ratings: Tony Awards Fall to All-Time Lows". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved June 10, 2019.
  39. ^ Hetrick, Adam (June 10, 2019). "Watch Cynthia Erivo Perform 'Can You Feel the Love Tonight' During 2019 Tony Awards In Memoriam". Playbill. TotalTheater. Retrieved June 10, 2019.

External links[edit]