740s

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Millennium: 1st millennium
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Events[edit]

740

This section is transcluded from 740. (edit | history)


By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]
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Africa[edit]
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Religion[edit]

741

This section is transcluded from 741. (edit | history)


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Byzantine Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]
= Switzerland =
Africa[edit]

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Religion[edit]

742

This section is transcluded from 742. (edit | history)

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]
Africa[edit]
Asia[edit]
  • Emperor Xuan Zong begins to favor Taoism over Buddhism, adopting the new reign title Tianbao ("Heavenly Treasures"), to indicate his divine mandate. The total number of enlisted troops in the Tang armies has risen to about half a million, due to Xuan Zongs's earlier military reforms.
  • For the municipal census of the Chinese capital city Chang'an and its metropolitan area of Jingzhou (including small towns in the vicinity), the New Book of Tang records that in this year there are 362,921 registered families with 1,960,188 persons.
  • Li Bai (also Li Po), Chinese poet, is summoned by Xuan Zong to attend the imperial court. He and his friend Du Fu become the two most prominent figures in the flourishing of Chinese poetry, during the mid-Tang Dynasty.

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Religion[edit]

743

This section is transcluded from 743. (edit | history)

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]
Britain[edit]
Arabian Empire[edit]
Japan[edit]
  • Emperor Shōmu changes the law of Perpetual Ownership of Cultivated Lands. This permit aristocrats and members of the clergy to cultivate land. The new farmland will be called shoin.
Americas[edit]

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Religion[edit]

744

This section is transcluded from 744. (edit | history)


By place[edit]

Europe[edit]
Britain[edit]
= Switzerland =
Arabian Empire[edit]
Asia[edit]
Americas[edit]

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Religion[edit]

745

This section is transcluded from 745. (edit | history)

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]
Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

746

This section is transcluded from 746. (edit | history)

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]
Britain[edit]
Unmayyad Caliphate[edit]
Asia[edit]

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Religion[edit]


747

This section is transcluded from 747. (edit | history)

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]
Islamic Empire[edit]
Asia[edit]


748

This section is transcluded from 748. (edit | history)

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]
Britain[edit]
Arabian Empire[edit]
Asia[edit]

749

This section is transcluded from 749. (edit | history)

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]
Britain[edit]
Arabian Empire[edit]
Japan[edit]
  • August 19Emperor Shōmu abdicates the throne, after a 25-year reign that has been dominated by his wife (and aunt), Kōmyō, a commoner he married at age 16. He is succeeded by his daughter Kōken; Shōmu becomes the first retired emperor to become a Buddhist priest.[25]

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Significant people[edit]

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References[edit]

  1. ^ Blankinship 1994, pp. 104–105, 117
  2. ^ Blankinship 1994, p. 170
  3. ^ de Oliviera Marques, A. H. (1993). "O Portugal Islâmico". In Joel Serrão and A. H. de Oliverira Marques. Hova Historia de Portugal. Portugal das Invasões Germânicas à Reconquista. Lisbon: Editorial Presença. p. 123. 
  4. ^ Hartmann, chapter II (pp. 2, 139)
  5. ^ Kirby, pp. 150 & 154; Yorke, Kings, p. 89
  6. ^ David Nicolle (2008). Poitiers AD 732, Charles Martel turns the Islamic tide (p. 19). ISBN 978-184603-230-1
  7. ^ Settipani 1989.
  8. ^ Gilbert Meynier (2010). L'Algérie cœur du Maghreb classique. De l'ouverture islamo-arabe au repli (658-1518). Paris: La Découverte; pp. 25
  9. ^ Wikisource-logo.svg Horace K. Mann (1913). "Pope St. Gregory III". In Herbermann, Charles. Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company. 
  10. ^ Serrão, Joel; de Oliveira Marques, A. H. (1993). "O Portugal Islâmico". Hova Historia de Portugal. Portugal das Invasões Germânicas à Reconquista. Lisbon: Editorial Presença. p. 123. 
  11. ^ Garland 2006, p. 9
  12. ^ Brian Todd Carey (2012). Road to Manzikert: "Byzantine warfare in an age of Crisis and Recovery", p. 71. ISBN 978-1-84884-215-1
  13. ^ Curta, Florin (2006). Southeastern Europe in the Middle Ages, 500-1250. Cambridge University Press, ISBN 9780521815390
  14. ^ Wickham 1981, p. 221.
  15. ^ Hallenbeck 1982, p. 51.
  16. ^ Dionysius of Telmahre apud Hoyland, 661 n 193
  17. ^ Costambeys, "Abel (fl. 744–747)"
  18. ^ Letter by Pope Zacharias to Boniface, dated Nov. 5, 744, ed. Tangl (no.58), tr. Emerton.
  19. ^ Pierre Riche, The Carolingians: A Family who forged Europe, pp. 51–52.
  20. ^ Grapard, Allan G. (1992). The Protocol of the Gods: A Study of the Kasuga Cult in Japanese History, p. 67; excerpt, "We have no information concerning Genbō's exile; the Shoku-Nihongi states simply that Genbō behaved in a manner that did not befit his ecclesiastic position and that he died in 746 as he was trying to escape."; Matsunaga, p. 125; excerpt, "...the degree of Genbō's corruption remains equivocal."
  21. ^ Barbara Yorke, 'East Saxons, kings of the (act. late 6th cent.–c.820)', Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 accessed 9 Feb 2008
  22. ^ Pryor & Jeffreys 2006, p. 33.
  23. ^ New Book of Tang, vol. 135
  24. ^ David Nicolle (2009). The Great Islamic Conquests 632–750 AD, p. 78. ISBN 978-1-84603-273-8
  25. ^ Varley, H. Paul (1980). A Chronicle of Gods and Sovereigns. New York: Columbia University Press. ISBN 0-231-04940-4