750 Motor Club

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750 Motor Club is a motor racing club in the UK. It was founded in 1939 to promote the sporting use of the Austin 7. (750 refers to the 750cc Austin 7 engine). It later led to racing and the 750 Formula where specials are raced. Famous members include Colin Chapman, Eric Broadley Adrian Reynard, Arthur Mallock, Derek Bennett, Tony Southgate, Brian Hart, Gordon Murray, Jem Marsh, Frank Costin and Mike Pilbeam.

The 750MC has continued to promote competitive, low-cost racing for enthusiasts, with a range of championships for production and racing sports cars, saloons and single-seaters.

Series and Championships[edit]

750 Formula Championship[edit]

The world's oldest sports prototype formula, with all cars using the 1.1 litre Fiat FIRE engine. There are three classes:

  • Class A: All competitors compete in this category.
  • Class B: Drivers who have not finished on the podium, in the top six in Class A, or won the Class B title in the last five years.
  • Class C: For college-entered teams.[1]

750 Formula is the longest running championship in the world.

Armed Forces Race Challenge[edit]

Primarily a motor racing community for Service personnel and veterans, AFRC rewards consistency as well as outright pace and achieved championship status in 2017.

Bernie's V8s / SR&GT Challenge[edit]

A mixed formula for retro performance icons, with a mixture of V8s and muscle cars from Bernie's V8s, and original or replica Sports and GT cars from SR&GT. Relaxed regulations allow plentiful eligibility, and different classes exist to separate levels of modification. Expect to see everything from a Porsche 917 replica to a Cobra, Datsun 240Z, TVRs and Corvettes racing together.

Bikesports Championship[edit]

A championship for sports-racing cars using production motorcycle 4-stroke engines, with their standard transmissions. There are four classes:

  • Class A: Cars using 'tuned' motorbike engines up to 1500cc (different weight limits apply based on capacity)
  • Class B: Cars using 'production' motorbike engines up to 1500cc (different weight limits apply based on capacity)
  • Class C: Cars using motorbike engines up to 1100cc

Birkett Relay[edit]

A six-hour relay event where competitors race for scratch and handicap positions, open to sports cars and saloon cars. The race was first run in 1951, and was created by Holland Birkett, who was one of the founding members of the 750 Motor Club. In 2001, a twelve-hour race was also held. Currently, the event is held at the Silverstone Circuit on the full Historic GP layout.[2]

Scratch winners:

  • 2017 – Dobbers (Thomas Harvey, Brian Harvey, John Macleod)
  • 2016 – We Don't Like Second (Aaron Bailey, Doug Carter, Brian Murphy, Simon Garmston, Lee Bailey)
  • 2015 – Inspires (Tim Gray, John Cutmore, Richard Wise, Alistair Boulton)
  • 2014 – The Winning Radicals (Aaron Bailey, Doug Carter, Brian Murphy, Lee Bailey and John Macleod)
  • 2013 – The Third Radicals (Aaron Bailey, Oliver Cox, Doug Carter, Charles Harvey-Kelly and Lee Bailey)
  • 2012 – Team O'BR (Mark Burton, Paul Rose, Graham Pattle, Graham Booth and Eugene O'Brien)
  • 2011 – IVOLT/Radical (Manhal Allos, Mark Smithson and Phil Abbott)
  • 2010 – Nearly Six Sevens (Peter Ratcliffe, Chris Porritt, Keith Dunn, Kevin Williams and Ian Wale)
  • 2009 – Geoff Steel Racing (Jamie Martin, Michael Symons, Keith Webster and Peter Moulsdale)
  • 2008 – Hart Attacks (Chris Hart, Barry Webb, Mike Evans, Jamie Champkin and Michelle Hayward)
  • 2007 – Gold Arts (Doug Newman, Simon Harris, John Schneider and Patrick Gormely)
  • 2006 – Gold Arts (Doug Newman, Simon Harris, Graham Booth and John Schneider)
  • 2005 – Gold Arts
  • 2004 – Glenn Racing
  • 2003 – Glenn Racing
  • 2002 – Woody's Wonders

Handicap winners:

  • 2017 – RAF MSA (Chris Slator, Darren Howe, Scott Lawson, Ed McKean, Dan Smith)
  • 2016 – Carbon8 Coupe Cup B (Will Taylforth, Alex Cursley, Simon Miles)
  • 2015 – Team Owens (Will Schryver, Steve Laidlaw, Carl Swift, Endaf Owens)

BMW 330 Challenge[edit]

A cost-controlled one make formula for the E46 BMW 330ci, with minimal mandatory parts and a 240bhp, RWD one-make grid.

Classic Stock Hatch Championship[edit]

A longstanding formula for 1,400 cc (85.4 cu in) multi-valve, or 1,600 cc (97.6 cu in) 8-valve engined hatchbacks. All cars models must have been produced prior to January 1992.[3]

Clio 182 Championship[edit]

A one-make championship for Renault Clio RenaultSport 182 cars, using the Cup chassis. All cars use the standard Renault F4R engine, with a K-Tec Racing ECU, and the stock Clio 182 transmission.[4]

Club Enduro Championship[edit]

An endurance racing championship designed with the club-level competitor and budget in mind. Races are usually two or three hours long, with at least one mandatory three-minute pitstop to allow re-fuelling. Three classes separated by power to weight allow the vast majority of cars to be eligible, with outputs monitored by 750MC's own mobile rolling road.

  • Class A: Up to 300bhp/tonne (power at flywheel, weight without driver).
  • Class B: Up to 240bhp/tonne (power at flywheel, weight without driver).
  • Class C: Up to 180bhp/tonne (power at flywheel, weight without driver).

Formula Vee Championship[edit]

The most cost-effective introduction into single-seater racing; Formula Vee cars utilise 1,300 cc (79.3 cu in) Volkswagen Beetle components, in single-seater chassis – often converted from Formula Ford units.[5]

Historic 750 Formula[edit]

This is a historic racing series catering for the previous two generations of 750 Formula cars, such as Austin Seven specials and Reliant-engined models, plus other small capacity racers 500 cc (30.5 cu in) Formula 3 cars, amongst others.[6]

Hot Hatch Championship[edit]

A formula for almost any naturally aspirated 2WD hatchback or hatchback-coupe. Re-launched in 2016 to follow on from the original, but now with power-to-weight rather than capacity class limits to ensure costs are tightly controlled.

  • Class A: Up to 260bhp/tonne (power at flywheel, weight with driver).
  • Class B: Up to 200bhp/tonne (power at flywheel, weight with driver).
  • Class C: Up to 145bhp/tonne (power at flywheel, weight with driver).

Locost Championship[edit]

A one-make championship for the DIY sports car Locost using the design from Ron Champion's book "Build Your Own Sports Car" . All cars use the 1,300 cc (79.3 cu in) Ford Crossflow engine mated to a 4-speed Escort or 4/5-speed Sierra Type 9 gearbox.[7]

M3 Cup Championship[edit]

A one-make championship for the E46 BMW M3, designed to offer heightened GT-esque performance in one-make racing.

MR2 Championship[edit]

A one-make championship for Toyota MR2 sports cars. There are two titles at stake for each driver, one for the overall results and one for the different classes:

  • Class A: First-generation Toyota MR2s, fitted with the Toyota 4A-GE engine.
  • Class B: Second-generation Toyota MR2s, fitted with the Toyota 3S-GE engine.
  • Class C: Third-generation Toyota MR2s (and MR-S), fitted with the Toyota 1ZZ-FE engine.[8]

MX-5 Cup[edit]

5 Club Racing was formed in 2014 and joined the 750 Motor Club to run the MX5 Cup for Mk1 Mazda MX5s. The series became a championship in 2015.[9]

RGB Sports 1000 Championship[edit]

Formerly known as simply 'RGB' (Roadgoing Bike-engined), the highly competituve champiponship was re-launched in 2018 to reflect what the cars had developed into over the years. Namely 'Motorsport's Most Affordable Sports-Racing Car Championship.' Cars use 1000cc motorcycle-engines but run semi-slick trackday tyres, with no wings allowed. Lap times showcase BTCC pace at most circuits.

Roadsports[edit]

The Roadsports series is a mini-enduro series for production-based, sports and saloon cars fitted with production engines from the same manufacturer. There are four classes, with A, B and C aligned with Club Enduro:

  • Class A: Up to 300bhp/tonne (power at flywheel, weight without driver).
  • Class B: Up to 240bhp/tonne (power at flywheel, weight without driver).
  • Class C: Up to 180bhp/tonne (power at flywheel, weight without driver).
  • Class D: Up to 145bhp/tonne (power at flywheel, weight without driver).

Sport Specials Championship[edit]

Previously known as the Kit Car Championship, until 2015 all cars were originally road legal, however this necessity was dropped in 2015 (see regulations [10]) to encourage more competitors. The championship caters for all manner of kit-type cars with production car powerplants, from Caterhams, Westfields and Sylva Sports Cars to home-developed one-offs.[11] There are two main classes, plus a third for MX150R models:

  • Class A: Up to 340bhp/tonne (power at flywheel, weight with driver).
  • Class B: Up to 270bhp/tonne (power at flywheel, weight with driver).
  • Class C: For MX150R kit cars

2014[edit]

Champions:

  • 750 Formula – Billy Albone
  • Bikesports – Adrian Reynard
  • Compact Cup – Stuart Voyce
  • Classic Stock Hatch – Lee Scott
  • Formula Vee – Martin Farmer
  • Locost – Matthew Brooks
  • MR2 Championship – Matt Palmer
  • RGB – Matt Higginson
  • Sport Specials – Paul Boyd
  • Stock Hatch – Shayne Deegan

2015[edit]

Champions:

  • 750 Formula – David Bartholomew
  • Bikesports – Tim Gray
  • Classic Stock Hatch – Matt Rozier
  • Clio 182 – James Bark
  • Civic Cup – Adam Shepherd
  • Compact Cup – Steve Roberts
  • Formula Vee – Paul Smith
  • Locost – Danny Andrew
  • MR2 – Shaun Traynor
  • MX5 Cup – Ben Short
  • RGB – Scott Mittell
  • Sport Specials – Adrian Cooper
  • Stock Hatch – Shayne Deegan

2016[edit]

Champions:

  • 750 Formula – Robin Gearing
  • Bikesports – Phil Knibb
  • Classic Stock Hatch – Matt Rozier
  • Clio 182 – Patrick Fletcher
  • Civic Cup – Class A: David Buky, Class B: Carl Swift
  • Formula Vee – Paul Smith
  • Locost – Ian Allee
  • MR2 – Jim Davies
  • MX5 – Will Blackwell-Chambers
  • RGB – Matt Higginson
  • Sport Specials – Matthew Booth
  • Stock Hatch – Ryan Polley

2017[edit]

Champions:

  • 750 Formula – Bill Cowley
  • Bikesports – Stefano Leaney
  • Classic Stock Hatch – Lee Scott
  • Clio 182 – Patrick Fletcher
  • Civic Cup – Class A: Lee Deegan
  • Formula Vee – Ben Miloudi
  • Locost – Ian Allee
  • MR2 – Shaun Traynor
  • MX5 – Ben Short
  • RGB – Billy Albone
  • Sport Specials – Paul Boyd
  • Hot Hatch – Paul Jarvis
  • Armed Forces Race Challenge – Paul Waterhouse
  • M3 Cup – Adam Shepherd


References[edit]

  1. ^ "750 Formula". 750 Motor Club. Retrieved 3 July 2013. 
  2. ^ "Birkett Relay". 750 Motor Club. Retrieved 3 July 2013. 
  3. ^ "Classic Stock Hatch". 750 Motor Club. Retrieved 3 July 2013. 
  4. ^ "Clio 182 Series". 750 Motor Club. Retrieved 3 July 2013. 
  5. ^ "Formula Vee". 750 Motor Club. Retrieved 3 July 2013. 
  6. ^ "750 Trophy". 750 Motor Club. Retrieved 3 July 2013. 
  7. ^ "Locost". 750 Motor Club. Retrieved 3 July 2013. 
  8. ^ "MR2". 750 Motor Club. Retrieved 3 July 2013. 
  9. ^ http://www.750mc.co.uk/formulae/mx5-cup.htm
  10. ^ http://www.750mc.co.uk/ugc-1/1/1/0/de1a08f8-b456-4ba8-9f21-e4d8b264ef44.pdf
  11. ^ "Sports Specials". 750 Motor Club. Retrieved 3 July 2013. 

External links[edit]