The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People

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The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People
The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People.jpg
Author Stephen R. Covey
Country United States
Language English
Subject Self-help
Genre non-fiction
Publisher Free Press
Publication date
1989
Media type Print (Hardcover, Paperback)
Pages 380
ISBN 0-7432-6951-9
OCLC 56413718
158 22
LC Class BF637.S8 C68 2004
Followed by The 8th Habit: From Effectiveness to Greatness

The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, first published in 1989, is a business and self-help book written by Stephen R. Covey.[1] Covey presents an approach to being effective in attaining goals by aligning oneself to what he calls "true north" principles of a character ethic that he presents as universal and timeless.

Covey's best-known book has sold more than 25 million copies worldwide since its first publication in 1989. The audio version became the first non-fiction audio-book in U.S. publishing history to sell more than one million copies.[2] Covey argues against what he calls "The Personality Ethic", something he sees as prevalent in many modern self-help books. He promotes what he labels "The Character Ethic": aligning one’s values with so-called "universal and timeless" principles. Covey adamantly refuses to conflate principles and values; he sees principles as external natural laws, while values remain internal and subjective. Covey proclaims that values govern people's behavior, but principles ultimately determine the consequences. Covey presents his teachings in a series of habits, manifesting as a progression from dependence via independence to interdependence.

Reception[edit]

The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People has sold more than 25 million copies in 40 languages worldwide, and the audio version has sold 1.5 million copies, and remains one of the best selling nonfiction business books. In August 2011 Time listed 7 Habits as one of "The 25 Most Influential Business Management Books".[3]

U.S. President Bill Clinton invited Covey to Camp David to counsel him on how to integrate the book into his presidency.[4]

Abundance mentality[edit]

Covey coined the idea of abundance mentality or abundance mindset, a concept in which a person believes there are enough resources and successes to share with others. He contrasts it with the scarcity mindset (i.e., destructive and unnecessary competition), which is founded on the idea that, if someone else wins or is successful in a situation, that means you lose; not considering the possibility of all parties winning (in some way or another) in a given situation (see zero-sum game). Individuals with an abundance mentality reject the notion of zero-sum games and are able to celebrate the success of others rather than feel threatened by it.[5]

Since this book's publishing, a number of books appearing in the business press have discussed the idea.[6] Covey contends that the abundance mentality arises from having a high self-worth and security (see Habits 1, 2, and 3), and leads to the sharing of profits, recognition and responsibility.[7] Organizations may also apply an abundance mentality when doing business.[8]

Adaptations[edit]

Sean Covey (Stephen's son) has written a version of the book for teens, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Teens. This version simplifies the 7 Habits for younger readers so they can better understand them. In September 2006, Sean Covey also published The 6 Most Important Decisions You Will Ever Make: A Guide for Teens. This guide highlights key times in the life of a teen and gives advice on how to deal with them.


See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People" author, Stephen Covey, dies". 
  2. ^ CNN Wire Staff. "'7 Habits' author Stephen Covey dead at 79". CNN. Retrieved 17 July 2012. 
  3. ^ Gandel, Stephen (August 9, 2011). "The 7 Habits Of Highly Effective People (1989), by Stephen R. Covey in The 25 Most Influential Business Management Books". Time. Retrieved January 4, 2011. 
  4. ^ Harper, Lena M. (Summer 2012). "The Highly Effective Person". Marriott Alumni Magazine (Brigham Young University). Retrieved August 11, 2012. 
  5. ^ English, L (2004). "The 7 Habits of Highly Effective Information Professionals, Part 7" (pdf). DM Review. September/October '04: 60–61. 
  6. ^ See for instance the chapter in Carolyn Simpson's High Performance through Negotiation.
  7. ^ Covey, S (2004). The Power of Character. Unlimited Publishing. p. 103. ISBN 1-58832-106-1. 
  8. ^ Krayer, Karl J.; Lee, William Thomas (2003). Organizing change: an inclusive, systemic approach to maintain productivity and achieve results. San Diego: Pfeiffer. p. 238. ISBN 0-7879-6443-3. 

External links[edit]