8,9-Dehydroestrone

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8,9-Dehydroestrone
8,9-Dehydroestrone.svg
Clinical data
SynonymsΔ8-Estrone; Estra-1,3,5(10),8-tetraen-3-ol-17-one
Routes of
administration
By mouth
Drug classEstrogen
Identifiers
CAS Number
PubChem CID
ChemSpider
UNII
CompTox Dashboard (EPA)
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC18H20O2
Molar mass268.350 g/mol g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)

8,9-Dehydroestrone, or Δ8-estrone, also known as estra-1,3,5(10),8-tetraen-3-ol-17-one, is a naturally occurring estrogen found in horses which is closely related to equilin, equilenin, and estrone, and, as the 3-sulfate ester sodium salt, is a minor constituent (3.5%) of conjugated estrogens (Premarin).[1][2][3][4] It produces 8,9-dehydro-17β-estradiol as an important active metabolite, analogously to conversion of estrone or estrone sulfate into estradiol.[2][4][5][3] The compound was first described in 1997.[6][3] In addition to 8,9-dehydroestrone and 8,9-dehydro-17β-estradiol, 8,9-dehydro-17α-estradiol is likely also to be present in conjugated estrogens, but has not been identified at this time.[2]

Composition of conjugated estrogens and properties of constituents

Compound Synonym Proportion (%) Relative potency
in the vagina (%)
Relative potency
in the uterus (%)
RBA for
ERα (%)
RBA for
ERβ (%)
ERα / ERβ
RBA ratio
Conjugated estrogens 100 38 100
Estrone 49.1–61.5 30 32 26 52 0.50
Equilin Δ7-Estrone 22.4–30.5 42 80 13 49 0.26
17α-Dihydroequilin Δ7-17α-Estradiol 13.5–19.5 0.06 2.6 41 32 1.30
17α-Estradiol 2.5–9.5 0.11 3.5 19 42 0.45
Δ8-Estrone 3.5–3.9 ? ? 19 32 0.60
Equilenin Δ6,8-Estrone 2.2–2.8 1.3 11.4 15 20–29 0.50–0.75
17β-Dihydroequilin Δ7-17β-Estradiol 0.5–4.0 83 200 113 108 1.05
17α-Dihydroequilenin Δ6,8-17α-Estradiol 1.2–1.6 0.018 1.3 20 49 0.40
17β-Estradiol 0.56–0.9 100 ? 100 100 1.00
17β-Dihydroequilenin Δ6,8-17β-Estradiol 0.5–0.7 0.21 9.4 68 90 0.75
Δ8-17β-Estradiol Small amounts ? ? 68 72 0.94
Notes: All listed compounds are present in conjugated estrogen products specifically in the form of the sodium salts of the sulfate esters (i.e., as sodium estrone sulfate, sodium equilin sulfate, etc.). Sources: See template.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Marc A. Fritz; Leon Speroff (28 March 2012). Clinical Gynecologic Endocrinology and Infertility. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. pp. 751–. ISBN 978-1-4511-4847-3.
  2. ^ a b c Bhavnani BR (January 1998). "Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of conjugated equine estrogens: chemistry and metabolism". Proc. Soc. Exp. Biol. Med. 217 (1): 6–16. doi:10.3181/00379727-217-44199. PMID 9421201.
  3. ^ a b c Bhavnani BR, Cecutti A, Gerulath A (October 1998). "Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of a novel estrogen delta8-estrone in postmenopausal women and men". J. Steroid Biochem. Mol. Biol. 67 (2): 119–31. PMID 9877212.
  4. ^ a b Baracat E, Haidar M, Lopez FJ, Pickar J, Dey M, Negro-Vilar A (June 1999). "Estrogen activity and novel tissue selectivity of delta8,9-dehydroestrone sulfate in postmenopausal women". J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab. 84 (6): 2020–7. doi:10.1210/jcem.84.6.5800. PMID 10372704.
  5. ^ Kuhl H (2005). "Pharmacology of estrogens and progestogens: influence of different routes of administration". Climacteric. 8 Suppl 1: 3–63. doi:10.1080/13697130500148875. PMID 16112947.
  6. ^ Bhavnani B. R., Cecutti A. and Dey M. S., Effects in postmenopausal women of delta-8-estrone sulfate: A novel estrogen component of Premarin. Journal Society Gynecologic Investigation 4 (1 (Suppl.)) (1997) 392.