820 Adriana

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820 Adriana
Discovery [1]
Discovered by M. Wolf
Discovery site Heidelberg Obs.
Discovery date 30 March 1916
Designations
MPC designation 820 Adriana
Named after
unknown[2]
1916 ZB · 1934 NA1
1934 PV · 1935 SE
1975 YP
main-belt
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 80.57 yr (29427 d)
Aphelion 3.2848 AU (491.40 Gm)
Perihelion 2.9746 AU (444.99 Gm)
3.1297 AU (468.20 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.049550
5.54 yr (2022.3 d)
284.54°
0° 10m 40.836s / day
Inclination 5.9337°
118.47°
193.08°
Earth MOID 1.95997 AU (293.207 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 1.8749 AU (280.48 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.203
Physical characteristics
Mean radius
29.325±1.25 km (IRAS:26)
0.0204±0.002 (IRAS:26)[1]
10.4[1]

820 Adriana, provisional designation 1916 ZB, is an exceptionally dark asteroid from the outer region of the asteroid belt, about 59 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered by German astronomer Max Wolf at Heidelberg Observatory in southern Germany, on 30 March 1916.[3]

The asteroid orbits the Sun at a distance of 3.0–3.3 AU once every 5 years and 7 months (2,027 days). Its orbit shows an eccentricity of 0.05 and is tilted by 6 degrees to the plane of the ecliptic.[1] According to the survey carried out by the Infrared Astronomical Satellite, IRAS, the asteroid's surface has an extremely low albedo of 0.02.[1] The body's spectral type remains unknown, as does its rotation period. By 2014, there were only 22 asteroids with an unknown rotation period for the low-numbered asteroids up to number 1000 (also see 398 Admete).

Any reference of this name to a person or occurrence is unknown.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 820 Adriana (1916 ZB)" (2015-12-10 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 4 May 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (820) Adriana. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 76. ISBN 978-3-540-29925-7. Retrieved 9 January 2016. 
  3. ^ "820 Adriana (1916 ZB)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 9 January 2016. 

External links[edit]