840s

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Millennium: 1st millennium
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The 840s decade ran from January 1, 840, to December 31, 849.

Events[edit]

840

By Place[edit]

Europe[edit]
Britain[edit]
Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

841[edit]

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]
Ireland[edit]
Byzantine Empire[edit]
Abbasid Caliphate[edit]
Asia[edit]
  • In the Chinese capital of Chang'an, the West Market (and East Market) are closed every night one hour and three quarters before dusk (by government order); the curfew signals by the sound of 300 beats to a loud gong. After the official markets have been closed for the night, small night markets in residential areas thrive with plenty of customers, despite government efforts to shut them down. With the decline of the government's authority (by mid 9th century), this edict (like many others) is largely ignored, as urban dwellers keep attending the night markets regardless.

842[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]
Britain[edit]
Abbasid Caliphate[edit]

843[edit]

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]
Britain[edit]
Arabian Empire[edit]
Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

844[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]
Britain[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

845[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]
Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]
  • John Scotus Eriugena, Irish theologian, travels to France and takes over the Palatine Academy in Paris, at the invitation of Charles the Bald (approximate date).

846[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]
Britain[edit]
Arabian Empire[edit]
Asia[edit]

847[edit]

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]
Abbasid Caliphate[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

848[edit]

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]
Britain[edit]
Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

849[edit]

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]
Abbasid Caliphate[edit]
Asia[edit]

Significant people[edit]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Zaluckyj & Zaluckyj, "Decline", pp. 238–239.
  2. ^ History of Central Asia.
  3. ^ Eric Joseph, Struggle for Empire, p. 103. Cornell University, 2006. ISBN 0-8014-3890-X. Joseph states this number, given by Agnellus of Ravenna, is probably exaggerated.
  4. ^ Recorded in the Chronicle of Fontenelle Abbey.
  5. ^ Treadgold 1988, pp. 324-325.
  6. ^ J. Norwich, A History of Venice, p. 32.
  7. ^ John Skylitzes, A Synopsis of Byzantine History, 811—1057: Translation and Notes, transl. John Wortley, 81note114.
  8. ^ Pierre Riche, The Carolingians: The Family who forged Europe, transl. Michael Idomir Allen, (University of Pennsylvania Press, 1983), p. 162.
  9. ^ Makrypoulias (2000), p. 351.
  10. ^ Treadgold (1997), p. 447.
  11. ^ Rucquoi, Adeline (1993). Histoire medieval de la Péninsule ibérique. Paris: Seuil. p. 87. ISBN 2-02-012935-3.
  12. ^ Merriam-Webster (Jan 2000). Merriam-Webster's Encyclopedia of World Religions, p. 231. ISBN 0-87779-044-2.
  13. ^ Leon Arpee (1946). A History of Armenian Christianity. The Armenian Missionary Association of America, New York, p. 107.
  14. ^ Vasiliev 1935, pp. 399–404.
  15. ^ Rucquoi, Adeline (1993). Histoire médiévale de la Péninsule ibérique. Paris: Seuil. p. 85. ISBN 2-02-012935-3.
  16. ^ AF a. 844: Karolus Aquitaniam, quasi ad partem regni sui iure pertinentem, affectans ... ("Charles wanted Aquitaine, which belonged by right to a part of his kingdom").
  17. ^ Huart 1986, p. 647.
  18. ^ Toynbee 1973, p. 391.
  19. ^ Jones 2001, p. 212.
  20. ^ Sawyer 2001, p. 40.
  21. ^ John V.A. Fine, Jr. (1991). The Early Medieval Balkans: A Critical Survey from the Sixth to the Late Twelfth Century, p. 110. ISBN 978-0-472-08149-3.
  22. ^ Goldberg 2006, p. 140.
  23. ^ Kreutz, p. 38.
  24. ^ Vasiliev (1935), p. 208.
  25. ^ Wards-Perkins, Bryan. From Classical Antiquity to the Middle Ages, p. 195. Oxford University Press, 1984. ISBN 0-19-821898-2.
  26. ^ Benvenuti, Gino (1985). Le Repubbliche Marinare. Amalfi, Pisa, Genova e Venezia. Rome: Newton & Compton Editori. p. 15. ISBN 88-8289-529-7.