852

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This article is about the year 852. For the number, see 852 (number).
Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries: 8th century9th century10th century
Decades: 820s  830s  840s  – 850s –  860s  870s  880s
Years: 849 850 851852853 854 855
852 by topic
Politics
State leadersSovereign states
Birth and death categories
BirthsDeaths
Establishment and disestablishment categories
EstablishmentsDisestablishments
852 in other calendars
Gregorian calendar 852
DCCCLII
Ab urbe condita 1605
Armenian calendar 301
ԹՎ ՅԱ
Assyrian calendar 5602
Bengali calendar 259
Berber calendar 1802
Buddhist calendar 1396
Burmese calendar 214
Byzantine calendar 6360–6361
Chinese calendar 辛未(Metal Goat)
3548 or 3488
    — to —
壬申年 (Water Monkey)
3549 or 3489
Coptic calendar 568–569
Discordian calendar 2018
Ethiopian calendar 844–845
Hebrew calendar 4612–4613
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 908–909
 - Shaka Samvat 774–775
 - Kali Yuga 3953–3954
Holocene calendar 10852
Iranian calendar 230–231
Islamic calendar 237–238
Japanese calendar Ninju 2
(仁寿2年)
Julian calendar 852
DCCCLII
Korean calendar 3185
Minguo calendar 1060 before ROC
民前1060年
Seleucid era 1163/1164 AG
Thai solar calendar 1394–1395

Year 852 (DCCCLII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Events[edit]

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]

Britain[edit]

  • A Viking fleet of 350 vessels enters the Thames Estuary before turning north and engages the Mercian forces under king Beorhtwulf. The Mercians are defeated and its remnants retreat to their settlements. The Vikings then turn south and cross the river somewhere in Surrey, there they are slaughtered by a West Saxon army led by king Æthelwulf and his son Aethelbald at Oak Field (Aclea).[1]
  • King Æthelstan, the eldest son of Æthelwulf, is killed by a Viking raiding party. He is succeeded by his brother Æthelberht who becomes sub-king of Kent, Essex, Surrey and Sussex (approximate date).
  • Beorhtwulf dies after a 12-year reign and is succeeded by his son Burgred as king of Mercia.

Arabian Empire[edit]

By topic[edit]

Aviation[edit]

Religion[edit]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Paul Hill (2009). The Viking Wars of Alfred the Great, p. 14. ISBN 978-1-59416-087-5
  2. ^ White 1961, pp. 100–101.