884 Priamus

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884 Priamus
Discovery [1]
Discovered by M. F. Wolf
Discovery site Heidelberg Obs.
Discovery date 22 September 1917
Designations
MPC designation 884 Priamus
Pronunciation ˈpraɪəməs
Named after
Priamus
(Greek mythology)[2]
1917 CQ · 1929 XX
1938 KE
Jupiter trojan[3]
(Trojan camp)[4]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 98.49 yr (35,973 days)       
Aphelion 5.8120 AU
Perihelion 4.5522 AU
5.1821 AU
Eccentricity 0.1216
11.80 yr (4,309 days)
207.45°
0° 5m 0.6s / day
Inclination 8.9139°
301.56°
335.63°
Jupiter MOID 0.42 AU
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 2.9610
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 96.29 km (calculated)[5]
101.09±0.54 km[6]
119.99±2.13 km[7]
6.854±0.002 h[8]
6.8605±0.0005 h[9]
6.8615±0.0005 h[10]
6.866±0.004 h[11]
6.894±0.020 h[11]
0.037±0.001[7]
0.044±0.002[6]
0.057 (assumed)[5]
B–V = 0.718[1] · 0.820[10]
U–B = 0.229[1]
V–R = 0.450[12] · 0.460[10]
Tholen = D[1] · D[5][13]
8.71±0.25[13]
8.81[1][5][7]
8.98[6]
8.98±0.02[10]

884 Priamus (prye'-ə-məs), provisional designation 1917 CQ, is a rare-type Jupiter trojan from the Trojan camp, approximately 100 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 22 September 1917, by German astronomer Max Wolf at Heidelberg Observatory, southern Germany.[3]

In the Tholen taxonomy, the dark and reddish body has a rare D-type. As of 2016, a total of 46 minor planets are known to possess this spectral type.[14] It is orbiting in the trailering Trojan camp, at Jupiter's L5 Lagrangian point, 60° behind the Gas Giant's orbit (also see Trojans in astronomy). The asteroid orbits the Sun at a distance of 4.6–5.8 AU once every 11 years and 10 months (4,309 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.12 and an inclination of 9° with respect to the ecliptic.[1] The asteroid's observation arc begins 2 months after its official discovery date, as the first recorded observation was made at Heidelberg in November 1917.[3]

According to the surveys carried out by the Japanese Akari satellite and the NEOWISE mission of NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, the asteroid measures 101.1 and 120.0 kilometers in diameter and its surface has an albedo of 0.037 of 0.044, respectively.[6][7] The Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link assumes a standard albedo for carbonaceous asteroids of 0.057 and calculates a diameter of 96.3 kilometers, based on an absolute magnitude of 8.81.[5]

Several rotational light-curves have been obtained for this asteroid from photometric observations. They gave a rotation period between 6.85 and 6.90 hours with a brightness variation between 0.23 and 0.40 in magnitude. The first two light-curve were obtained by Stefano Mottola in January 1993 and October 2001, in collaboration with Claes-Ingvar Lagerkvist and Marco Delbo at Kvistaberg and Pino Torinese observatories, respectively (U=3/2+).[11] Two well-defined light-curves were also obtained by Robert D. Stephens and Linda M. French at the Center for Solar System Studies and Illinois Wesleyan University in July 2010 and January 2015 (U=3/3).[8][9] In addition, observations by Ukrainian astronomers in August 2010, were also used to build a well defined light-curve (U=3).[10]

The minor planet was named for Priamus (or Priam), the king of Troy during the Trojan War. The Jupiter trojans 624 Hektor and 3317 Paris are named after his sons Paris and Hector (H 86).[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 884 Priamus (1917 CQ)" (2016-05-05 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 18 August 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2007). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (884) Priamus. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 80. ISBN 978-3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 18 August 2016. 
  3. ^ a b c "884 Priamus (1917 CQ)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 18 August 2016. 
  4. ^ "List of Jupiter Trojans". Minor Planet Center. 20 June 2016. Retrieved 18 August 2016. 
  5. ^ a b c d e "LCDB Data for (884) Priamus". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 18 August 2016. 
  6. ^ a b c d Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Hand, E.; Bauer, J.; Tholen, D.; et al. (November 2011). "NEOWISE Studies of Spectrophotometrically Classified Asteroids: Preliminary Results" (PDF). The Astrophysical Journal. 741 (2): 25. arXiv:1109.6407free to read. Bibcode:2011ApJ...741...90M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/741/2/90. Retrieved 18 August 2016. 
  7. ^ a b c d Usui, Fumihiko; Kuroda, Daisuke; Müller, Thomas G.; Hasegawa, Sunao; Ishiguro, Masateru; Ootsubo, Takafumi; et al. (October 2011). "Asteroid Catalog Using Akari: AKARI/IRC Mid-Infrared Asteroid Survey" (PDF). Publications of the Astronomical Society of Japan. 63 (5): 1117–1138. Bibcode:2011PASJ...63.1117U. doi:10.1093/pasj/63.5.1117. Retrieved 18 August 2016. 
  8. ^ a b Stephens, Robert D.; Coley, Daniel R.; French, Linda M. (July 2015). "Dispatches from the Trojan Camp - Jovian Trojan L5 Asteroids Observed from CS3: 2014 October - 2015 January". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 42 (3): 216–224. Bibcode:2015MPBu...42R.216S. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 18 August 2016. 
  9. ^ a b French, Linda M.; Stephens, Robert D.; Lederer, Susan M.; Rohl, Derrick A. (January 2011). "The Lightcurve of Jovian Trojan Asteroid 884 Priamus". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 38 (1): 2–3. Bibcode:2011MPBu...38....2F. ISSN 1052-8091. Retrieved 18 August 2016. 
  10. ^ a b c d e Shevchenko, V. G.; Belskaya, I. N.; Slyusarev, I. G.; Krugly, Yu. N.; Chiorny, V. G.; Gaftonyuk, N. M.; et al. (January 2012). "Opposition effect of Trojan asteroids". Icarus. 217 (1): 202–208. Bibcode:2012Icar..217..202S. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2011.11.001. Retrieved 18 August 2016. 
  11. ^ a b c Mottola, Stefano; Di Martino, Mario; Erikson, Anders; Gonano-Beurer, Maria; Carbognani, Albino; Carsenty, Uri; et al. (May 2011). "Rotational Properties of Jupiter Trojans. I. Light Curves of 80 Objects". The Astronomical Journal. 141 (5): 32. Bibcode:2011AJ....141..170M. doi:10.1088/0004-6256/141/5/170. Retrieved 18 August 2016. 
  12. ^ Chatelain, Joseph P.; Henry, Todd J.; French, Linda M.; Winters, Jennifer G.; Trilling, David E. (June 2016). "Photometric colors of the brightest members of the Jupiter L5 Trojan cloud". Icarus. 271: 158–169. Bibcode:2016Icar..271..158C. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2016.01.026. Retrieved 18 August 2016. 
  13. ^ a b Veres, Peter; Jedicke, Robert; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Denneau, Larry; Granvik, Mikael; Bolin, Bryce; et al. (November 2015). "Absolute magnitudes and slope parameters for 250,000 asteroids observed by Pan-STARRS PS1 - Preliminary results". Icarus. 261: 34–47. arXiv:1506.00762free to read. Bibcode:2015Icar..261...34V. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2015.08.007. Retrieved 18 August 2016. 
  14. ^ "JPL Small-Body Database Search Engine: [ spec. type = D (Tholen) or type = D (SMASSII) ]". JPL Solar System Dynamics. Retrieved 18 August 2016. 

External links[edit]