890s

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Events[edit]

890


By place[edit]

Europe[edit]
Britain[edit]

891[edit]


By place[edit]

Europe[edit]
Arabian Empire[edit]
Japan[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]


892[edit]


By place[edit]

Europe[edit]
Britain[edit]
Arabian Empire[edit]
Asia[edit]


893[edit]


By place[edit]

Europe[edit]
Britain[edit]
Arabian Empire[edit]
Eurasia[edit]

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Religion[edit]


894[edit]


By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]
Britain[edit]
  • The Vikings in Northumbria and East Anglia swear allegiance and hand over hostages to King Alfred the Great, but promptly break their truce by attacking the south-west of England. A Viking force returns from Exeter and sails along the coast, in a attempt to plunder Chichester. They are defeated by the Saxon garrison, losing many ships and men.[21]
  • King Anarawd of Gwynedd's shaky alliance with the Vikings collapses. His kingdom is ravaged by the Norsemen. Anarawd is forced to ask for help from Alfred the Great and submits to his overlordship. Alfred imposes oppressive terms and forces Anarawd's confirmation in the Christian Church, with Alfred as 'godfather'.
  • Autumn – Battle of Benfleet: Danish Viking forces retire to Essex, after being deprived of food by Alfred the Great (see 893). They draw their longships up the Thames and into the Lea, entrenching themselves at Benfleet.[22]
Japan[edit]


895[edit]


By place[edit]

Europe[edit]
Britain[edit]
Arabian Empire[edit]

By topic[edit]

Music[edit]


896[edit]


By place[edit]

Europe[edit]
Britain[edit]
Arabian Empire[edit]
China[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]


897[edit]


By place[edit]

Europe[edit]
Britain[edit]
  • English warships (nine vessels from Alfred's new fleet) intercept six Viking longships in the mouth of an unknown estuary on the south coast (possibly at Poole Harbour) in Dorset. The Danes are blockaded, and three ships attempt to break through the English lines. Lashing the Viking boats to their own, the English crew board the enemy's vessels and kill everyone on board. Some ships manage to escape, two of the other three boats where driven against the Sussex coast. The shipwrecked sailors are brought before King Alfred the Great at Winchester and hanged. Just one Viking ship returns to East Anglia.[33]
Arabian Empire[edit]
Japan[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]
  • January – The Cadaver Synod: Lambert II orders Stephen VI to exhume the nine-month-old cadaver of former pope Formosus, to redress in papal robes and placed in a chair on trail at St. Peter's. Formosus is 'convicted' of several crimes, his fingers of consecration are cut off, and the body is stripped of his vestments.
  • August – Stephen VI is removed from office, imprisoned and strangled in his cell. He is succeeded by Romanus as the 114th pope of the Catholic Church.
  • December – Romanus is deposed and succeeded by Theodore II as the 115th pope of Rome, but dies twenty days later.


898[edit]


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Europe[edit]
Britain[edit]

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Religion[edit]


899[edit]

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]
  • Summer – King Arnulf of Carinthia enlists the support of the Magyars to raid northern Italy. They overrun the Lombard plain all the way to Pavia. King Berengar I assembles a large army against the Magyars and confronts them near the Adda River. Daunted at the strong force, Árpád (head of the confederation of the Hungarian tribes) offers to make peace and restore much of what they've taken, if they are permitted to leave Italy unmolested. Berengar refuses and the Magyars withdraw to the Brenta River. Árpád renews his offer, offering to leave all his booty and even some hostages. Again Berengar refuses, and awaits them to cross the Brenta River for a final battle.
  • Battle of the Brenta: The Magyars, consisting of 5,000 men, take a circuitous route through the mountains, crossing the Brenta River and proceed south to fall upon the encamped Lombard army (15,000 men) at Cartigliano. The Magyars massacre much of Berengar's unprepared army. He himself manages to escape to Pavia, changing his dress with the clothing of one of his soldiers. Árpád renews the offensive and heads across Lombardy, pillaging the countryside around Treviso, Vicenza, Bergamo and other towns all the way to Vercelli. He turns south and heads down the Aemilian Road, sacking Reggio Emilia, Modena and Bologna.[36]
  • December 8 – Arnulf of Carinthia dies from paralysis following a stroke and is entombed in St. Emmeram's Abbey at Regensburg (Bavaria). He is succeeded by his 6-year-old son Louis III (the Child) as ruler of the East Frankish Kingdom. Arnulf's counselor Hatto I, archbishop of Mainz, becomes regent and guardian of the young king. Louis (possibly at the instigation of Hatto) claims Lotharingia from his half-brother Zwentibold and with support of the East-Frankish nobles he provokes a civil war. The Lombard throne is left temporarily vacant.
  • Winter – The Magyars turn back north towards the shores of the Venetian Lagoon. They pillage Chioggia and Pellestrina, and advance towards Malamocco. Their advance into the lagoon is checked by the assembly of the Venetian fleet under doge Pietro Tribuno, which defeats the Magyar's river-crossing vessels at Albiola and they pull back. The close-call with the Magyars prompts the Venetians to initiate the fortification of the Rialto and the building of protective chains over the Grand Canal.
Britain[edit]
Arabian Empire[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]


Significant people[edit]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ St Oswald's Priory, English Heritage.
  2. ^ Mann III, p. 377.
  3. ^ Kreutz 1996, pp. 63–66.
  4. ^ Kristó 1996, p. 175.
  5. ^ Kirschbaum 2005, p. 29.
  6. ^ Paul Hill (2009). The Viking Wars of Alfred the Great, p. 120. ISBN 978-1-59416-087-5.
  7. ^ Paul Hill (2009). The Viking Wars of Alfred the Great, p. 121. ISBN 978-1-59416-087-5.
  8. ^ Amari 1854, p. 429.
  9. ^ Lee Hyun-hee, Park Sung-soo, Yoon Nae-hyun, translated by The Academy of Korean Studies, New History of Korea pp. 263–265, Jimoondang, Paju, 2005. ISBN 89-88095-85-5.
  10. ^ John V.A. Fine, Jr (1991). The Early Medieval Balkans: A Critical Survey from the Sixth to the Late Twelfth Century, p. 130. ISBN 978-0-472-08149-3.
  11. ^ Michel Parisse, "Lotharingia", The New Cambridge Medieval History, III: c. 900–c. 1024, ed. Timothy Reuter (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005), pp. 313–315.
  12. ^ Paul Hill (2009). The Viking Wars of Alfred the Great, pp. 124–125. ISBN 978-1-59416-087-5.
  13. ^ John Haywood (1995). Historical Atlas of the Vikings, pp. 66–67. ISBN 978-0-140-51328-8.
  14. ^ Paul Hill (2009). The Viking Wars of Alfred the Great, pp. 128–130. ISBN 978-1-59416-087-5.
  15. ^ John Haywood (1995). Historical Atlas of the Vikings, pp. 66–67. ISBN 978-0-140-51328-8.
  16. ^ Bianquis 1998, pp. 105–106.
  17. ^ Coedès, George (1968). Walter F. Vella, ed. The Indianized States of Southeast Asia. trans.Susan Brown Cowing. University of Hawaii Press. ISBN 978-0-8248-0368-1. 
  18. ^ John V.A. Fine, Jr. (1991). A Critical Survey from the Sixth to the Late Twelfth Century, pp. 137–138. ISBN 978-0-472-08149-3.
  19. ^ Lajos Gubcsi (2011), Hungary in the Carpathian Basin, p. 7. ISBN 978-963-327-515-3.
  20. ^ Longworth, Philip (1997), The making of Eastern Europe: from prehistory to postcommunism (1997 ed.), Palgrave Macmillan, p. 321, ISBN 0-312-17445-4 
  21. ^ Paul Hill (2009). The Viking Wars of Alfred the Great, p. 132. ISBN 978-1-59416-087-5.
  22. ^ Paul Hill (2009). The Viking Wars of Alfred the Great, p. 134. ISBN 978-1-59416-087-5.
  23. ^ John V.A. Fine, Jr. (1991). The Early Medieval Balkans: A Critical Survey from the Sixth to the Late Twelfth Century, p. 138. ISBN 978-0-472-08149-3.
  24. ^ John V.A. Fine, Jr. (1991). The Early Medieval Balkans: A Critical Survey from the Sixth to the Late Twelfth Century, pp. 138–139. ISBN 978-0-472-08149-3.
  25. ^ Paul Hill (2009). The Viking Wars of Alfred the Great, pp. 134–135. ISBN 978-1-59416-087-5.
  26. ^ Reuter, Timothy (trans.) The Annals of Fulda Archived February 26, 2010, at the Wayback Machine.. (Manchester Medieval series, Ninth-Century Histories, Volume II.) Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1992.
  27. ^ John V.A. Fine, Jr. (1991). The Early Medieval Balkans: A Critical Survey from the Sixth to the Late Twelfth Century, p. 139. ISBN 978-0-472-08149-3.
  28. ^ Kazhdan, Alexander, ed. (1991), Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium, Oxford University Press, p. 317, ISBN 978-0-19-504652-6 
  29. ^ Sismondi, History of the Italian Republics in the Middle Ages, p. 24.
  30. ^ Fine 1991, p. 141.
  31. ^ Paul Hill (2009). The Viking Wars of Alfred the Great, p. 139. ISBN 978-1-59416-087-5.
  32. ^ Kennedy 1993, pp. 759–760.
  33. ^ Paul Hill (2009). The Viking Wars of Alfred the Great, pp. 140–141. ISBN 978-1-59416-087-5.
  34. ^ Michel Parisse, "Lotharingia", The New Cambridge Medieval History, III: c. 900–c. 1024, ed. Timothy Reuter (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005), pp. 313–15.
  35. ^ Paul Hill (2009). The Viking Wars of Alfred the Great, p. 142. ISBN 978-1-59416-087-5.
  36. ^ AF(B), 900 (p. 141 and n4), with a loss of 20,000 men and many bishops. Corroborated by Liutprand, Antapodosis.
  37. ^ Paul Hill (2009). The Viking Wars of Alfred the Great, pp. 142–143. ISBN 978-1-59416-087-5.