90th Minnesota Legislature

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Ninetieth Minnesota Legislature
89th
Minnesota State Capitol 2017.jpg
Overview
Term January 3, 2017 (2017-01-03) – January 7, 2019 (2019-01-07)
Election 2016 General Election
Website www.leg.state.mn.us
Senate
90MNSenateStructure.svg
Members 67 senators
President Michelle Fischbach (R)
until May 25, 2018
Majority Leader Paul Gazelka (R)
Minority Leader Tom Bakk (DFL)
Party control Republican Party
House of Representatives
90MNHouseStructure.svg
Members 134 representatives
Speaker Kurt Daudt (R)
Majority Leader Joyce Peppin (R)
until July 2, 2018
Minority Leader Melissa Hortman (DFL)
Party control Republican Party
Sessions
2017 January 3, 2017 (2017-01-03) – May 22, 2017 (2017-05-22)
2018 February 20, 2018 (2018-02-20) – May 20, 2018 (2018-05-20)
Special sessions
2017, 1st May 23, 2017 (2017-05-23) – May 26, 2017 (2017-05-26)

The Ninetieth Minnesota Legislature is the current legislature of the U.S. state of Minnesota. It is composed of the Senate and the House of Representatives, based on the results of the 2016 Senate election and the 2016 House election. It convened in Saint Paul on January 3, 2017, and will end its term on January 7, 2019. It held its regular session from January 3 to May 22, 2017, and from February 20 to May 20, 2018. A special session to complete unfinished business was held from May 23 to 26, 2017.[1]

Major events[edit]

  • January 23, 2017: Governor Mark Dayton delivered his 2017 State of the State address in a joint session. Near the end of his speech, Dayton collapsed and was attended to by, among others, state senators and physicians Scott Jensen and Matt Klein.[2][3]
  • February 22, 2017: A joint session was held to elect regents of the University of Minnesota.[4]
  • March 14, 2018: Governor Dayton delivered his 2018 State of the State address in a joint session.[5]
  • May 10, 2018: A joint session was held to elect a regent of the University of Minnesota.[6]

Major legislation[edit]

Enacted[edit]

Proposed[edit]

Boldface indicates the bill was passed by its house of origin.

Vetoed[edit]

Boldface indicates the act was passed by both houses.
2017[edit]
2017, 1st Special Session[edit]
2018[edit]

Summary of actions[edit]

In this Legislature, all acts have been approved (signed) by Governor Mark Dayton, with the notable exceptions of H.F. No. 809, an act that would prohibit public funding of abortions; H.F. No. 812, an act that would require facilities that perform abortions to be licensed; the first set of acts appropriating money for the state budget; H.F. No. 4, the first 2017 omnibus tax act; H.F. No. 140, an act that would change how public school teachers are licensed; 2017, First Special Session S.F. No. 3, an act that would notably prohibit local governments from setting a higher minimum wage and from requiring benefits for private sector employees than what is required by state law; H.F. No. 4385, the first 2018 omnibus tax act; H.F. No. 390, an act that would increase penalties for obstructing freeways, airport public roadways, and interfering with public transit; S.F. No. 3656, the omnibus supplemental appropriations act; H.F. No. 947, the second 2018 omnibus tax act; and S.F. No. 2809, an act that would change the composition of the Metropolitan Council from gubernatorial appointees to county and city elected officials—all of which were vetoed. In Laws 2017, First Special Session chapter 4, the omnibus state government appropriations act, two appropriations for the Senate and the House of Representatives were line-item vetoed. Chapter 13, the reinsurance act, became law without the governor's signature.

In total, 33 acts have been vetoed, three items of appropriation in two acts have been line-item vetoed, and two acts have become law without the governor's signature.[74] No acts or items have been enacted by the Legislature over the governor's veto. After the adjournment of the 2017, First Special Session—legislative leaders sued Governor Dayton over the validity of his line-item vetoes for legislative appropriations. The ensuing court case, Ninetieth Minnesota State Senate v. Dayton, proceeded to the Minnesota Supreme Court; the Court upheld the governor's vetoes.[75]

Political composition[edit]

Resignations and new members are discussed in the "Changes in membership" section below.

Senate[edit]

Senate composition      33 Republican      33 DFL      1 Vacant
Party
(Shading indicates majority caucus)
Total Vacant
Republican Democratic–
Farmer–Labor
End of the previous Legislature 28 38 66 1
Begin 34 33 67 0
December 15, 2017 32 66 1
February 20, 2018 33 67 0
May 25, 2018 33 66 1
Latest voting share 50% 50%

House of Representatives[edit]

House composition      76 Republican      55 DFL      3 Vacant
Party
(Shading indicates majority caucus)
Total Vacant
Republican Democratic–
Farmer–Labor
End of the previous Legislature 73 61 134 0
Begin 76 57 133 1
February 21, 2017 77 134 0
November 30, 2017 76 133 1
February 20, 2018 77 134 0
April 20, 2018 56 133 1
July 2, 2018 76 132 2
September 5, 2018 55 131 3
Latest voting share 58% 42%

Leadership[edit]

Seal of Minnesota-alt.png
This article is part of a series on the
politics and government of
Minnesota
Constitution

Senate[edit]

Majority (Republican) leadership[edit]

Minority (DFL) leadership[edit]

House of Representatives[edit]

Majority (Republican) leadership[edit]

Minority (DFL) leadership[edit]

Members[edit]

For full lists of members of the 90th Minnesota Legislature, see Minnesota Senate and Minnesota House of Representatives.

Changes in membership[edit]

Senate[edit]

District Vacator Reason for change Successor Date successor
seated
54 Dan Schoen (DFL) Resigned effective December 15, 2017.[78]
A special election was held on February 12, 2018.
Karla Bigham (DFL) February 20, 2018
13 Michelle Fischbach (R) Resigned effective May 25, 2018.[79]
A special election will be held on November 6, 2018.
TBD TBD

House of Representatives[edit]

District Vacator Reason for change Successor Date successor
seated
32B Bob Barrett (R) Ineligible for re-election.[80]
A special election was held on February 14, 2017.
Anne Neu (R) February 21, 2017
23B Tony Cornish (R) Resigned effective November 30, 2017.[81]
A special election was held on February 12, 2018.
Jeremy Munson (R) February 20, 2018
61B Paul Thissen (DFL) Resigned effective April 20, 2018.[82]
A special election will not be held.
N/A N/A
34A Joyce Peppin (R) Resigned effective July 2, 2018.[83]
A special election will not be held.
N/A N/A
49B Paul Rosenthal (DFL) Resigned effective September 5, 2018.[84]
A special election will not be held.
N/A N/A

Committees[edit]

Senate[edit]

Committee Chair Vice Chair DFL Lead
Aging and Long-Term Care Policy Karin Housley Jerry Relph Kent Eken
Agriculture, Rural Development, and Housing Finance Torrey Westrom Mark Johnson Kari Dziedzic
Agriculture, Rural Development, and Housing Policy Bill Weber Mike Goggin Foung Hawj
Capital Investment Dave Senjem Bill Ingebrigtsen Sandy Pappas
Commerce and Consumer Protection Finance and Policy Gary Dahms Karin Housley Dan Sparks
E–12 Education Finance Carla Nelson Eric Pratt[nb 1] Chuck Wiger
Gary Dahms[nb 2]
E–12 Education Policy Eric Pratt Justin Eichorn Susan Kent
Energy and Utilities Finance and Policy David Osmek Andrew Mathews John Marty
Environment and Natural Resources Finance Bill Ingebrigtsen Carrie Ruud David Tomassoni
Environment and Natural Resources Policy and Legacy Finance Carrie Ruud Bill Weber Chris Eaton
Finance Julie Rosen Michelle Fischbach[nb 3] Dick Cohen
Health and Human Services Finance and Policy Michelle Benson Scott Jensen Tony Lourey
Higher Education Finance and Policy Michelle Fischbach[nb 3] Rich Draheim Greg Clausen
Human Services Reform Finance and Policy Jim Abeler Paul Utke Jeff Hayden
Jobs and Economic Growth Finance and Policy Jeremy Miller Paul Anderson Bobby Joe Champion
Judiciary and Public Safety Finance and Policy Warren Limmer Dan Hall Ron Latz
Local Government Dan Hall Bruce Anderson Patricia Torres Ray
Rules and Administration Paul Gazelka Michelle Benson Tom Bakk
Subcommittees Committees Paul Gazelka
Conference Committees Paul Gazelka
Ethical Conduct Michelle Fischbach[nb 3]
Litigation Expenses[nb 4] Scott Newman
State Government Finance and Policy and Elections Mary Kiffmeyer Mark Koran Jim Carlson
Taxes Roger Chamberlain Dave Senjem Ann Rest
Transportation Finance and Policy Scott Newman John Jasinski Scott Dibble
Veterans and Military Affairs Finance and Policy Bruce Anderson Andrew Lang Jerry Newton
Select Committees
Health Care Consumer Access and Affordability[nb 5] Scott Jensen Julie Rosen Melissa Halvorson Wiklund

House of Representatives[edit]

Committee Chair Vice Chair DFL Lead(s)
Agriculture Finance Rod Hamilton Tim Miller Jeanne Poppe
Agriculture Policy Paul Anderson Jeff Backer David Bly
Capital Investment Dean Urdahl Mark Uglem Alice Hausman
Civil Law and Data Practices Policy Peggy Scott Dennis Smith John Lesch
Commerce and Regulatory Reform Joe Hoppe Kelly Fenton Linda Slocum
Education Finance Jenifer Loon Peggy Bennett Jim Davnie
Education Innovation Policy Sondra Erickson Brian Daniels Carlos Mariani
Environment and Natural Resources Policy and Finance Dan Fabian Josh Heintzeman Rick Hansen
Subcommittee Mining, Forestry, and Tourism Chris Swedzinski Dale Lueck Jason Metsa
Ethics Sondra Erickson Mary Murphy
Government Operations and Elections Policy Tim O'Driscoll Cindy Pugh Mike Nelson
Health and Human Services Finance Matt Dean Tony Albright Erin Murphy
Health and Human Services Reform Joe Schomacker Glenn Gruenhagen Tina Liebling
Subcommittees Aging and Long-Term Care Deb Kiel Tama Theis Susan Allen
Childcare Access and Affordability Mary Franson Roz Peterson Peggy Flanagan
Higher Education and Career Readiness Policy and Finance Bud Nornes Drew Christensen Gene Pelowski
Job Growth and Energy Affordability Policy and Finance Pat Garofalo Jim Newberger Karen Clark
Tim Mahoney
Jean Wagenius
Legacy Funding Finance Bob Gunther Sandy Layman Leon Lillie
Public Safety and Security Policy and Finance Tony Cornish[nb 6] Brian Johnson[nb 7] Debra Hilstrom
Brian Johnson[nb 8] Kathy Lohmer[nb 9]
Rules and Legislative Administration Joyce Peppin[nb 10] Dave Baker Melissa Hortman
Subcommittee Workplace Safety and Respect[nb 11] Joyce Peppin[nb 10] Kelly Fenton Melissa Hortman
State Government Finance Sarah Anderson Jim Nash Sheldon Johnson
Division Veterans Affairs Bob Dettmer Matt Bliss Paul Rosenthal[nb 12]
Taxes Greg Davids Joe McDonald Paul Marquart
Division Property Tax and Local Government Finance Steve Drazkowski Jerry Hertaus Diane Loeffler
Transportation Finance Paul Torkelson John Petersburg Frank Hornstein
Transportation and Regional Governance Policy Linda Runbeck Jon Koznick Connie Bernardy
Ways and Means Jim Knoblach Bob Vogel Lyndon Carlson
Select Committees
Technology and Responsive Government[nb 13] Dave Baker

Administrative officers[edit]

Senate[edit]

  • Secretary: Cal Ludeman
  • First Assistant Secretary: Colleen Pacheco
  • Second Assistant Secretary: Mike Linn
  • Third Assistant Secretary: Jessica Tupper
  • Engrossing Secretary: Melissa Mapes
  • Sergeant at Arms: Sven Lindquist
  • Assistant Sergeant at Arms: Marilyn Logan
  • Chaplain: Mike Smith (2017)

House of Representatives[edit]

  • Chief Clerk: Patrick Murphy
  • First Assistant Chief Clerk: Tim Johnson
  • Second Assistant Chief Clerk: Gail Romanowski
  • Desk Clerk: Marilee Davis
  • Legislative Clerk: David Surdez
  • Chief Sergeant at Arms: Bob Meyerson
  • Assistant Sergeant at Arms: Erica Brynildson
  • Assistant Sergeant at Arms: Andrew Olson
  • Index Clerk: Carl Hamre

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Until February 28, 2018.[85]
  2. ^ From February 28, 2018.[85]
  3. ^ a b c Until May 25, 2018.
  4. ^ Established January 31, 2017.[86]
  5. ^ Established May 22, 2017.[87]
  6. ^ Until November 9, 2017.[88]
  7. ^ Until February 8, 2018.[89]
  8. ^ From February 8, 2018.[89]
  9. ^ From c. 2018.
  10. ^ a b Until July 2, 2018.
  11. ^ Established February 7, 2018.[90]
  12. ^ Until September 5, 2018.
  13. ^ Established February 16, 2017.[91]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Golden, Erin; Coolican, J. Patrick (May 26, 2017). "Minnesota Legislature adjourns special session". Star Tribune. Retrieved May 26, 2017. 
  2. ^ Lopez, Ricardo (January 24, 2017). "Gov. Mark Dayton fainted near the end of his annual statewide address". Star Tribune. Retrieved March 14, 2017. 
  3. ^ Montgomery, David; Stassen-Berger, Rachel E. (January 23, 2017). "Mark Dayton recovering after collapsing during his State of the State address". Pioneer Press. Retrieved February 20, 2018. 
  4. ^ Verges, Josh (February 22, 2017). "Steve Sviggum, General Mills CEO elected to UMN Board of Regents". Pioneer Press. Retrieved March 14, 2017. 
  5. ^ Van Berkel, Jessie; Coolican, J. Patrick (March 15, 2018). "Gov. Mark Dayton wraps up his final State of the State speech with a focus on finances". Star Tribune. Retrieved May 3, 2018. 
  6. ^ Koumpilova, Mila (May 10, 2018). "Legislature picks Randy Simonson as new University of Minnesota regent amid abortion controversy". Star Tribune. Retrieved May 10, 2018. 
  7. ^ Golden, Erin (January 26, 2017). "Dayton, GOP legislators strike deal on insurance rebates". Star Tribune. Retrieved March 14, 2017. 
  8. ^ Bierschbach, Briana (March 7, 2017). "Dayton signs booze bill; liquor stores can be open on Sundays starting July 2". MinnPost. Retrieved March 14, 2017. 
  9. ^ Golden, Erin (April 3, 2017). "Dayton won't block $542M for insurance companies, but withholds signature". Star Tribune. Retrieved April 3, 2017. 
  10. ^ Bierschbach, Briana (May 18, 2017). "With new law, Minnesota becomes the last state to comply with federal Real ID Act". MinnPost. Retrieved May 18, 2017. 
  11. ^ a b c Coolican, J. Patrick (May 30, 2017). "Dayton signs 10 budget bills and tax cuts, but defunds Legislature". Star Tribune. Retrieved May 30, 2017. 
  12. ^ Cox, Peter (May 23, 2017). "Students at Minnesota's public colleges face likely tuition hikes". Minnesota Public Radio. Retrieved May 24, 2017. 
  13. ^ Magan, Christopher; Vezner, Tad (May 22, 2017). "Protester penalties out, ban on undocumented immigrant driver's licenses in". Pioneer Press. Retrieved May 23, 2017. 
  14. ^ Moore, Janet (May 24, 2017). "Transportation bill staves off transit cuts — for now". Star Tribune. Retrieved May 24, 2017. 
  15. ^ Magan, Christopher (May 26, 2017). "Education budget boosts funding, but teachers union urges veto". Pioneer Press. Retrieved May 26, 2017. 
  16. ^ Zdechlik, Mark (May 31, 2017). "Holding his nose, Dayton signs Health and Human Services bill". Minnesota Public Radio. Retrieved May 31, 2017. 
  17. ^ Salisbury, Bill (May 30, 2017). "Get ready for some construction cranes. Mark Dayton signs $990M infrastructure bill". Pioneer Press. Retrieved May 30, 2017. 
  18. ^ Van Berkel, Jessie (February 22, 2018). "Minnesota Legislature votes to restore House, Senate operating budgets". Star Tribune. Retrieved February 26, 2018. 
  19. ^ Van Berkel, Jessie (March 23, 2018). "Lawmakers reach compromise on $10M for vehicle system repairs". Star Tribune. Retrieved May 2, 2018. 
  20. ^ Pugmire, Tim (April 19, 2018). "MN Senate backs penalties for passing off untrained pets as service animals". Minnesota Public Radio. Retrieved May 2, 2018. 
  21. ^ Golden, Erin (May 30, 2018). "Dayton OKs $1.5 billion for public works, including school safety". Star Tribune. Retrieved May 30, 2018. 
  22. ^ Van Berkel, Jessie (May 31, 2018). "Dayton signs pension bill aimed at long-term stability in state retirement system". Star Tribune. Retrieved May 31, 2018. 
  23. ^ Hinrichs, Erin (March 12, 2018). "Edina Young Conservatives Club lawsuit inspires bill in Legislature". MinnPost. Retrieved May 2, 2018. 
  24. ^ Moore, Janet; Harlow, Tim (February 8, 2017). "Distracted-driving bill aims 'to stop the carnage on our roads today'". Star Tribune. Retrieved April 6, 2017. 
  25. ^ Bakst, Brian (May 10, 2018). "Hands-free cell phone bill moving in House but still stalled in Senate". Minnesota Public Radio. Retrieved May 10, 2018. 
  26. ^ Harlow, Tim (May 15, 2018). "'Hands-free' cellphone bill unlikely to become law in Minnesota this year". Star Tribune. Retrieved May 15, 2018. 
  27. ^ Furst, Randy (January 24, 2017). "Bill to crack down on Minnesota protesters appears to be national trend". Star Tribune. Retrieved March 14, 2017. 
  28. ^ a b Williams, Brandt; Cox, Peter (March 8, 2017). "Committee debates bills aimed at self-defense, permit to carry laws". Minnesota Public Radio. Retrieved March 15, 2017. 
  29. ^ a b Vezner, Tad (May 25, 2017). "Minnesota gun rights legislation fails to get far, despite Republican legislative control". Pioneer Press. Retrieved May 25, 2017. 
  30. ^ Brooks, Jennifer (May 15, 2017). "Minnesota House cracks down on female genital mutilation". Star Tribune. Retrieved May 15, 2017. 
  31. ^ Koumpilova, Mila; Mahamud, Faiza (May 19, 2017). "Minnesota bill against female genital mutilation raises opposition". Star Tribune. Retrieved May 25, 2017. 
  32. ^ Feshir, Riham (April 9, 2018). "Women share stories of genital mutilation, support bill to fight the procedure". Minnesota Public Radio. Retrieved May 3, 2018. 
  33. ^ a b Vezner, Tad (March 1, 2018). "Gun control bills tabled — surprising few, but with all eyes on November". Pioneer Press. Retrieved May 2, 2018. 
  34. ^ Dupuy, Beatrice (January 24, 2017). "School choice debate kicks off at Minn. State Capitol". Star Tribune. Retrieved March 14, 2017. 
  35. ^ Van Berkel, Jessie; Howatt, Glenn (March 12, 2018). "GOP proposes work requirement for Minnesotans getting medical assistance". Star Tribune. Retrieved May 2, 2018. 
  36. ^ Howatt, Glenn (March 29, 2018). "Medicaid work requirements proposal advances in the Legislature". Star Tribune. Retrieved May 2, 2018. 
  37. ^ Van Berkel, Jessie (April 10, 2018). "DFL lawmakers call for changes to child protection system's treatment of black families". Star Tribune. Retrieved May 3, 2018. 
  38. ^ Magan, Christopher (March 1, 2018). "Grieving families push for bill to pay for opioid treatment and prevention". Pioneer Press. Retrieved May 15, 2018. 
  39. ^ Coolican, J. Patrick (May 5, 2018). "Tsunami of lobbying greets bipartisan effort at Minnesota Capitol to tax opioids". Star Tribune. Retrieved May 10, 2018. 
  40. ^ Collins, Jon (May 10, 2018). "Senate passes bill to combat opioid addiction". Minnesota Public Radio. Retrieved May 10, 2018. 
  41. ^ a b Coolican, J. Patrick (February 9, 2017). "Some DFL lawmakers call for legal marijuana, acknowledge uphill battle". Star Tribune. Retrieved March 14, 2017. 
  42. ^ Moore, Janet (April 13, 2018). "Minnesota voters may decide whether auto taxes should pay for roads, bridges". Star Tribune. Retrieved May 2, 2018. 
  43. ^ Pugmire, Tim (May 8, 2018). "Transportation amendment hits pothole in state Senate". Minnesota Public Radio. Retrieved May 9, 2018. 
  44. ^ Pugmire, Tim (May 17, 2018). "Spinning their wheels? House OKs transportation measure". Minnesota Public Radio. Retrieved May 17, 2018. 
  45. ^ Van Berkel, Jessie (March 8, 2018). "Minnesota DFL legislators propose raising age to buy semiautomatic weapons to 21". Star Tribune. Retrieved May 2, 2018. 
  46. ^ Bierschbach, Briana (April 20, 2018). "Lawmakers unveil proposal to redefine what sexual harassment means in Minnesota". MinnPost. Retrieved May 2, 2018. 
  47. ^ Van Berkel, Jessie (May 3, 2018). "Change to sexual harassment standard stalls in Minnesota Senate". Star Tribune. Retrieved May 3, 2018. 
  48. ^ Golden, Erin (March 2, 2017). "In first step, Minnesota House votes to block cities' wage, workplace rules". Star Tribune. Retrieved March 27, 2017. 
  49. ^ Golden, Erin (April 20, 2017). "Minnesota Senate approves bill blocking cities' wage, sick-leave ordinances". Star Tribune. Retrieved April 20, 2017. 
  50. ^ Van Berkel, Jessie (April 16, 2018). "Battle over local control is about-face for GOP legislators". Star Tribune. Retrieved May 3, 2018. 
  51. ^ a b Lopez, Ricardo (May 10, 2017). "As expected, Gov. Dayton vetoes two bills that sought limits on abortions in Minnesota". Star Tribune. Retrieved May 10, 2017. 
  52. ^ Golden, Erin (April 28, 2017). "Minnesota Republicans in Legislature line up behind budget plan". Star Tribune. Retrieved April 29, 2017. 
  53. ^ Lopez, Ricardo (May 12, 2017). "Dayton follows through on threat, vetoes 5 budget bills". Star Tribune. Retrieved May 13, 2017. 
  54. ^ Montgomery, David (May 15, 2017). "Mark Dayton vetoes all budget bills — with only six days to go". Pioneer Press. Retrieved May 15, 2017. 
  55. ^ Coolican, J. Patrick (March 29, 2017). "Republicans want to reshape environmental protection, meeting stiff DFL resistance". Star Tribune. Retrieved March 29, 2017. 
  56. ^ Magan, Christopher (May 2, 2017). "Education budget proposal focuses on flexibility; critics say it's not enough". Pioneer Press. Retrieved May 9, 2017. 
  57. ^ Bierschbach, Briana (April 20, 2017). "State budget battle revolves around a basic question: How much should it cost to run Minnesota's government?". MinnPost. Retrieved April 20, 2017. 
  58. ^ Golden, Erin (April 1, 2017). "Minnesota House passes $2.2 billion plan to improve roads, bridges". Star Tribune. Retrieved April 1, 2017. 
  59. ^ Lopez, Ricardo (March 20, 2017). "Minnesota Senate GOP transportation plan calls for diverting general fund money". Star Tribune. Retrieved March 27, 2017. 
  60. ^ Vezner, Tad (May 2, 2017). "From police training to protests, Legislature drafts joint public safety bill". Pioneer Press. Retrieved May 9, 2017. 
  61. ^ Bierschbach, Briana (April 28, 2017). "Why higher ed funding could be a major sticking point in budget negotiations at the state Capitol". MinnPost. Retrieved April 29, 2017. 
  62. ^ Golden, Erin (May 10, 2017). "Budget progress in Minnesota Legislature delayed with lawmaker's absence". Star Tribune. Retrieved May 10, 2017. 
  63. ^ Magan, Christopher (May 18, 2017). "Mark Dayton vetoes teacher licensing overhaul bill". Pioneer Press. Retrieved May 18, 2017. 
  64. ^ Stassen-Berger, Rachel E. (May 30, 2017). "Mark Dayton vetoes bill curtailing cities' paid-time off, minimum wage rules". Pioneer Press. Retrieved May 30, 2017. 
  65. ^ Van Berkel, Jessie (May 12, 2018). "Minnesota House, Senate reach deal on tax bill". Star Tribune. Retrieved May 14, 2018. 
  66. ^ Keen, Judy (May 15, 2018). "Minnesota House passes GOP tax bill; Gov. Dayton not yet on board". Star Tribune. Retrieved May 15, 2018. 
  67. ^ Keen, Judy (May 17, 2018). "Minnesota Capitol standoff fuels worries about chaotic tax season next year". Star Tribune. Retrieved May 17, 2018. 
  68. ^ Lopez, Ricardo (February 22, 2017). "Bills to crack down on Minnesota protesters advance in House, Senate". Star Tribune. Retrieved March 14, 2017. 
  69. ^ Van Berkel, Jessie (May 9, 2018). "Minnesota House passes stronger penalties for freeway protests, despite impassioned opposition". Star Tribune. Retrieved May 9, 2018. 
  70. ^ Pugmire, Tim (May 14, 2018). "Bill toughening protester penalties heads to Dayton". Minnesota Public Radio. Retrieved May 16, 2018. 
  71. ^ Orrick, Dave (May 19, 2018). "Mark Dayton vetoes plan to increase penalties for protesters who mess up transportation". Pioneer Press. Retrieved May 20, 2018. 
  72. ^ a b Van Berkel, Jessie (May 23, 2018). "Gov. Mark Dayton vetoes tax, spending bills". Star Tribune. Retrieved May 23, 2018. 
  73. ^ Callaghan, Peter (May 29, 2018). "A bill to reform the Met Council will probably be vetoed. That doesn't mean a lot of people still don't have problems with the Met Council". MinnPost. Retrieved May 30, 2018. 
  74. ^ "Veto Details". Minnesota Legislative Reference Library. Retrieved May 30, 2018. 
  75. ^ Golden, Erin (November 17, 2017). "Minnesota Supreme Court upholds Gov. Mark Dayton's veto of House, Senate budget". Star Tribune. Retrieved November 22, 2017. 
  76. ^ a b "Senate DFL Caucus elects Assistant Leaders". Minnesota Senate DFL. Retrieved February 3, 2017. 
  77. ^ a b c d "Senate DFL Caucus Appoints Freshman Assistant Leader and Caucus Whips". Minnesota Senate DFL. Retrieved February 3, 2017. 
  78. ^ Xiong, Chao; Coolican, J. Patrick (November 23, 2017). "Despite resignation, Sen. Dan Schoen's lawyer says DFLer 'never meant to sexually harass anybody'". Star Tribune. Retrieved December 4, 2017. 
  79. ^ Golden, Erin; Coolican, J. Patrick (May 25, 2018). "Fischbach resigns from state Senate, is sworn in as lieutenant governor". Star Tribune. Retrieved May 25, 2018. 
  80. ^ Montgomery, David (September 8, 2016). "Lawmaker doesn't live in district, MN Supreme Court rules; ballot won't count". Pioneer Press. Retrieved September 8, 2016. 
  81. ^ Coolican, J. Patrick (November 21, 2017). "Minnesota state Rep. Tony Cornish to resign after harassment claims". Star Tribune. Retrieved December 1, 2017. 
  82. ^ Van Berkel, Jessie (April 17, 2018). "Paul Thissen, former state House speaker, to join Minnesota Supreme Court". Star Tribune. Retrieved April 19, 2018. 
  83. ^ Van Berkel, Jessie (May 30, 2018). "Majority Leader Joyce Peppin resigning from state House". Star Tribune. Retrieved July 1, 2018. 
  84. ^ "Rep. Rosenthal resigns from House of Representatives". Session Daily. Minnesota House of Representatives Public Information Services. September 6, 2018. Retrieved September 6, 2018. 
  85. ^ a b "Thursday, March 8, 2018" (PDF). Journal of the Senate. Minnesota Senate. pp. 6283–4. Retrieved May 6, 2018. 
  86. ^ "Thursday, February 2, 2017" (PDF). Journal of the Senate. Minnesota Senate. p. 458. Retrieved April 20, 2017. 
  87. ^ "Monday, May 22, 2017" (PDF). Journal of the Senate. Minnesota Senate. p. 6100. Retrieved February 8, 2018. 
  88. ^ Cook, Mike (November 21, 2017). "Cornish to step down amid sexual harassment allegations". Session Daily. Minnesota House of Representatives Public Information Services. Retrieved May 6, 2018. 
  89. ^ a b Mohr, Jonathan (February 8, 2018). "Johnson appointed chairman of House Public Safety Committee". Session Daily. Minnesota House of Representatives Public Information Services. Retrieved February 8, 2018. 
  90. ^ Cook, Mike (February 7, 2018). "House creates subcommittee to address workplace respect issues". Session Daily. Minnesota House of Representatives Public Information Services. Retrieved February 8, 2018. 
  91. ^ "Thursday, February 16, 2017" (PDF). Journal of the House. Minnesota House of Representatives. p. 552. Retrieved March 12, 2017. 

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Eighty-ninth Minnesota Legislature
Ninetieth Minnesota Legislature
2017–2018
Succeeded by
Ninety-first Minnesota Legislature