916

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
916 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar916
CMXVI
Ab urbe condita1669
Armenian calendar365
ԹՎ ՅԿԵ
Assyrian calendar5666
Balinese saka calendar837–838
Bengali calendar323
Berber calendar1866
Buddhist calendar1460
Burmese calendar278
Byzantine calendar6424–6425
Chinese calendar乙亥(Wood Pig)
3612 or 3552
    — to —
丙子年 (Fire Rat)
3613 or 3553
Coptic calendar632–633
Discordian calendar2082
Ethiopian calendar908–909
Hebrew calendar4676–4677
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat972–973
 - Shaka Samvat837–838
 - Kali Yuga4016–4017
Holocene calendar10916
Iranian calendar294–295
Islamic calendar303–304
Japanese calendarEngi 16
(延喜16年)
Javanese calendar815–816
Julian calendar916
CMXVI
Korean calendar3249
Minguo calendar996 before ROC
民前996年
Nanakshahi calendar−552
Seleucid era1227/1228 AG
Thai solar calendar1458–1459
Tibetan calendar阴木猪年
(female Wood-Pig)
1042 or 661 or −111
    — to —
阳火鼠年
(male Fire-Rat)
1043 or 662 or −110
Mosaic of Clement of Ohrid (ca. 840–916)

Year 916 (CMXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Events[edit]

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]

  • Sicilian Berbers in Agrigento revolt and depose the independent Emir Ahmed ibn Khorob. They offer Sicily to the Fatimid Caliphate in Ifriqiya (modern Tunisia). Caliph Abdullah al-Mahdi Billah welcomes this turn of events, but refuses to grant the Berber rulers their autonomy. He sends a Fatimid expeditionary force under Abu Said Musa which lands in Sicily and, with some difficulty, takes control of the island. Abdullah al-Mahdi Billah appoints Salam ibn Rashid as the emir of Sicily. Ahmed ibn Khorob is dispatched to Raqqada and executed.[1]

Britain[edit]

Asia[edit]

  • Abaoji, Khitan ruler and founder of the Liao Dynasty, adopts Chinese court formalities in which he declares himself emperor in the Chinese style and adopts an era name, Taizu of Liao. He names his eldest son Yelü Bei as heir apparent, a first in the history of the Khitan. Abaoji leads a campaign in the west, conquering much of the Mongolian Plains.[3]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Italian History: Timeline - Lombard Leagues Board history-timeline?page=10.
  2. ^ Charles-Edwards, T. M. (2013). Wales and the Britons 350–1064. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. p. 505. ISBN 978-0-19-821731-2. 
  3. ^ Mote 2003, pp. 42–43.