920s

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Millennium: 1st millennium
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Events[edit]

920

This section is transcluded from 920. (edit | history)


By place[edit]

Europe[edit]
Africa[edit]
Asia[edit]
  • Abaoji orders the adoption of a written script by the Khitan, resulting in the creation of Khitan "Large Script."
  • Chroniclers in Baghdad record an unusually cold summer.[2]
Britain[edit]

921

This section is transcluded from 921. (edit | history)


By place[edit]

Africa[edit]
Asia[edit]
Europe[edit]


922

This section is transcluded from 922. (edit | history)

By place[edit]

Asia[edit]
Europe[edit]

923

This section is transcluded from 923. (edit | history)


By place[edit]

Americas[edit]
Asia[edit]
Europe[edit]


924

This section is transcluded from 924. (edit | history)


By place[edit]

Asia[edit]
Europe[edit]


925

This section is transcluded from 925. (edit | history)


By place[edit]

Africa[edit]
Asia[edit]
Europe[edit]


926

This section is transcluded from 926. (edit | history)


By place[edit]

Asia[edit]
Europe[edit]
  • A Hungarian army besieges Augsburg in Swabia, then conquers the monastery of St. Gallen in today's Switzerland. After an unsuccessful battle with the locals, they burn the suburbs of Konstanz, then they cross westwards and defeat the Alsacian army led by Liutfred. The army reaches today's Belgium and the Atlantic coasts.


927

This section is transcluded from 927. (edit | history)


By place[edit]

Asia[edit]
Europe[edit]

By place[edit]

Religion[edit]


928

This section is transcluded from 928. (edit | history)


By place[edit]

Asia[edit]
  • Dao Kang Di succeeds Gong Hui Di, and is followed in the same year by Tai Zu, all of the Dali Gu Dynasty in southeast China.
  • Jayavarman IV succeeds Isanavarman II in the Khmer Empire, and moves the capital north from Angkor to Koh Ker.
Europe[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]


929

This section is transcluded from 929. (edit | history)


By place[edit]

Asia[edit]
Europe[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]


Significant people[edit]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Timothy Reuter (1999). The New Cambridge Medieval History: Volume III, p. 314. ISBN 0-521-36447-8.
  2. ^ Domínguez-Castro, Fernando; Vaquero, José Manuel; Marín, Manuela; Gallego, María Cruz; García-Herrera, Ricardo. "How useful could Arabic documentary sources be for reconstructing past climate?" Weather 67(3): 76-82 DOI: 10.1002/wea.835 march 2012.
  3. ^ Gilbert Meynier (2010) L'Algérie cœur du Maghreb classique. De l'ouverture islamo-arabe au repli (658-1518). Paris: La Découverte; pp.28.
  4. ^ Gilbert Meynier (2010) L'Algérie cœur du Maghreb classique. De l'ouverture islamo-arabe au repli (658-1518). Paris: La Découverte; pp.38.