920s

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Millennium: 1st millennium
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The 920s decade ran from January 1, 920, to December 31, 929.

Events[edit]

920

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]
Britain[edit]
Iberian Peninsula[edit]
Africa[edit]
Asia[edit]
  • Emperor Taizu of the Khitan Empire orders the adoption of a written script by the Khitan, resulting in the creation of Khitan "Large Script."

By topic[edit]

Climate[edit]

921[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]
Arabian Empire[edit]
Africa[edit]
China[edit]

922[edit]

By place[edit]

923[edit]

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]
Asia[edit]

924[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]
Britain[edit]
Asia[edit]

925[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]
Africa[edit]
Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

926[edit]

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]
Britain[edit]
Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

927[edit]

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]
Britain[edit]
Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

928[edit]

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]
England[edit]
Arabian Empire[edit]
  • Summer – An Arab expeditionary force led by the Slavic Sabir returns and seizes Otranto (Southern Italy). Although pressed by an epidemic, they withdraw their forces. After capturing some enclaves on the Tyrrhenian coast, Sabir sails into the harbors of Naples and Salerno, and forces the dukes (dux) to pay an enormous sum of tribute to go away.
Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

929[edit]

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]
Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

Significant people[edit]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Timothy Reuter (1999). The New Cambridge Medieval History: Volume III, p. 563. ISBN 978-0-521-36447-8.
  2. ^ Timothy Reuter (1999). The New Cambridge Medieval History: Volume III, p. 314. ISBN 978-0-521-36447-8.
  3. ^ Timothy Reuter (1999). The New Cambridge Medieval History: Volume III, p. 675. ISBN 978-0-521-36447-8.
  4. ^ Domínguez-Castro, Fernando; Vaquero, José Manuel; Marín, Manuela; Gallego, María Cruz; García-Herrera, Ricardo. "How useful could Arabic documentary sources be for reconstructing past climate?" Weather 67(3): 76-82 doi:10.1002/wea.835 march 2012.
  5. ^ Timothy Reuter (1999). The New Cambridge Medieval History: Volume III, p. 241. ISBN 978-0-521-36447-8.
  6. ^ Knight, Judson. Ahmad ibn Fadlan: An Arab Among the Vikings of Russia. Science and Its Times. Ed. Neil Schlager and Josh Lauer. Vol. 2: 700 to 1449. Detroit: Gale, 2001, pp. 32–34. Gale Virtual Reference Library.
  7. ^ Gilbert Meynier (2010). L'Algérie cœur du Maghreb classique. De l'ouverture islamo-arabe au repli (658-1518). Paris: La Découverte; p. 28.
  8. ^ Gilbert Meynier (2010). L'Algérie cœur du Maghreb classique. De l'ouverture islamo-arabe au repli (658-1518). Paris: La Découverte; p. 38.
  9. ^ Timothy Reuter (1999). The New Cambridge Medieval History: Volume III, p. 379. ISBN 978-0-521-36447-8.
  10. ^ Timothy Reuter (1999). The New Cambridge Medieval History: Volume III, p. 349. ISBN 978-0-521-36447-8.
  11. ^ Runciman, A history of the First Bulgarian Empire, pp. 169–172.
  12. ^ Timothy Reuter (1999). The New Cambridge Medieval History, Volume III, p. 543. ISBN 978-0-521-36447-8.
  13. ^ Rodriguez Fernández, Justiniao (1997). García I, Ordoño II, Fruela II, Alfonso IV. Burgos: Editorial La Olmeda. pp. 176–178. ISBN 84-920046-8-1.
  14. ^ Timothy Reuter (1999). The New Cambridge Medieval History, Volume III, p. 341. ISBN 978-0-521-36447-8.
  15. ^ John V.A. Fine, Jr (1991). The Early Medieval Balkans: A Critical Survey from the Sixth to the Late Twelfth Century, p. 157. ISBN 978-0-472-08149-3.
  16. ^ John V.A. Fine, Jr (1991). The Early Medieval Balkans: A Critical Survey from the Sixth to the Late Twelfth Century, p. 161. ISBN 978-0-472-08149-3.
  17. ^ Palmer, Alan; Palmer, Veronica (1992). The Chronology of British History. London: Century Ltd. pp. 42–47. ISBN 978-0-7126-5616-0.
  18. ^ Barford, Paul M. (2001). The Early Slavs: Culture and Society in Early Medieval Eastern Europe. Ithaca: Cornell University Press. p. 421. ISBN 0-8014-3977-9.
  19. ^ Abd-ar-Rahman III Archived 17 February 2008 at the Wayback Machine.
  20. ^ Spuler, Bertold; F.R.C. Bagley. The Muslim world: a historical survey, Part 4. Brill Archive. p. 252. ISBN 9789004061965.