925 Alphonsina

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925 Alphonsina
Discovery [1]
Discovered by J. Comas Solà
Discovery site Fabra Observatory
Discovery date 13 January 1920
Designations
MPC designation 925 Alphonsina
Named after
Alfonso X and Alfonso XIII
(King of Castile/Spain)[2]
1920 GM · A902 ED
main-belt · (outer)[3]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 113.79 yr (41561 days)
Aphelion 2.9140 AU (435.93 Gm)
Perihelion 2.4884 AU (372.26 Gm)
2.7012 AU (404.09 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.078777
4.44 yr (1621.6 d)
251.27°
0° 13m 19.2s / day
Inclination 21.075°
299.60°
201.33°
Earth MOID 1.50879 AU (225.712 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 2.19787 AU (328.797 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.267
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 54.34±3.4 km (IRAS: 35)[4]
59.2 km[5]
58±16 km[6]
62.57±0.64 km[7]
58.000±4.841 km[8]
58.062 km[9]
63.52±11.11 km[10]
58.06 km (taken)[3]
Mean radius
27.17±1.7 km
7.880 h (0.3283 d)[1][11]
7.92 h[a]
7.876 h[12]
7.8780±0.0004 h[12]
7.883±0.002 h[b]
7.87754±0.00005 h[13]
7.87754±0.00005 h[6]
0.2786±0.038 (IRAS: 35)[1][4]
0.218[5]
0.25±0.05[14]
0.214±0.006[7]
0.2533±0.0534[8]
0.2266[9]
0.204±0.069[10]
B–V = 0.850
U–B = 0.454
S (Tholen), S (SMASS)
S[3]
8.33[1]

925 Alphonsina, provisional designation 1920 GM, is a large, stony asteroid from the outer region of the asteroid belt, about 58 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered by Spanish astronomer of Catalan origin, Josep Comas i Solà, at the Fabra Observatory in Barcelona, on 13 January 1920.[15]

The S-type asteroid orbits the Sun at a distance of 2.5–2.9 AU once every 4 years and 5 months (1,622 days). Its orbit is tilted by 21 degrees to the plane of the ecliptic and shows an eccentricity of 0.08. A large number of photometric light-curve analysis rendered a well-defined, concurring rotation period of 7.9 hours for the body.

According to the surveys carried out by the Infrared Astronomical Satellite, IRAS, the Japanese Akari satellite, and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer with its subsequent NEOWISE mission, the asteroid's albedo is in the range of 0.20–0.28.[4][7][8][9][14] In addition, the body's albedo has been inferred by using the technique of stellar occultation in 2003. The measurement also gave a diameter of 59.2 kilometers.[5]

The minor planet was named in honor of the Iberian Kings, Alfonso X (1221–1284) and Alfonso XIII (1886–1941), King of Castile and Spain, respectively. The original citation mentions, that the 13th century king inspired the field of astronomy in the Middle Ages, and, that the latter king was a great enthusiast of the scientific development in Spain. It also mentions that the King of Spain approved the naming of the asteroid.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hanslmeier (1980): rotation period 7.92 hours with a brightness amplitude of 0.18 mag. Summary figures at Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link (CALL) for (925) Alphonsina
  2. ^ Hamanowa (2011) web: rotation period 7.883±0.002 hours with a brightness amplitude of 0.30 mag. Summary figures at Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link (CALL) for (925) Alphonsina
  1. ^ a b c d e "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 925 Alphonsina (1920 GM)" (2015-11-21 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 2 May 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Schmadel, Lutz D. (2003). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (925) Alphonsina. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. p. 82. ISBN 978-3-540-29925-7. Retrieved December 2015.  Check date values in: |access-date= (help)
  3. ^ a b c "LCDB Data for (925) Alphonsina". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved December 2015.  Check date values in: |access-date= (help)
  4. ^ a b c Tedesco, E. F.; Noah, P. V.; Noah, M.; Price, S. D. (October 2004). "IRAS Minor Planet Survey V6.0". NASA Planetary Data System. Bibcode:2004PDSS...12.....T. Retrieved December 2015.  Check date values in: |access-date= (help)
  5. ^ a b c Shevchenko, Vasilij G.; Tedesco, Edward F. (September 2006). "Asteroid albedos deduced from stellar occultations". Icarus. 184 (1): 211–220. Bibcode:2006Icar..184..211S. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2006.04.006. Retrieved December 2015.  Check date values in: |access-date= (help)
  6. ^ a b Durech, Josef; Kaasalainen, Mikko; Herald, David; Dunham, David; Timerson, Brad; et al. (August 2011). "Combining asteroid models derived by lightcurve inversion with asteroidal occultation silhouettes". Icarus. 214 (2): 652–670. arXiv:1104.4227free to read. Bibcode:2011Icar..214..652D. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2011.03.016. Retrieved December 2015.  Check date values in: |access-date= (help)
  7. ^ a b c Usui, Fumihiko; Kuroda, Daisuke; Müller, Thomas G.; Hasegawa, Sunao; Ishiguro, Masateru; et al. (October 2011). "Asteroid Catalog Using Akari: AKARI/IRC Mid-Infrared Asteroid Survey". Publications of the Astronomical Society of Japan. 63 (5): 1117–1138. Bibcode:2011PASJ...63.1117U. doi:10.1093/pasj/63.5.1117. Retrieved December 2015.  Check date values in: |access-date= (help)
  8. ^ a b c Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Hand, E.; Bauer, J.; et al. (November 2011). "NEOWISE Studies of Spectrophotometrically Classified Asteroids: Preliminary Results". The Astrophysical Journal. 741 (2): 25. arXiv:1109.6407free to read. Bibcode:2011ApJ...741...90M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/741/2/90. Retrieved December 2015.  Check date values in: |access-date= (help)
  9. ^ a b c Pravec, Petr; Harris, Alan W.; Kusnirák, Peter; Galád, Adrián; Hornoch, Kamil (September 2012). "Absolute magnitudes of asteroids and a revision of asteroid albedo estimates from WISE thermal observations". Icarus. 221 (1): 365–387. Bibcode:2012Icar..221..365P. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2012.07.026. Retrieved December 2015.  Check date values in: |access-date= (help)
  10. ^ a b Masiero, Joseph R.; Mainzer, A. K.; Grav, T.; Bauer, J. M.; Cutri, R. M.; et al. (November 2012). "Preliminary Analysis of WISE/NEOWISE 3-Band Cryogenic and Post-cryogenic Observations of Main Belt Asteroids". The Astrophysical Journal Letters. 759 (1): 5. arXiv:1209.5794free to read. Bibcode:2012ApJ...759L...8M. doi:10.1088/2041-8205/759/1/L8. Retrieved December 2015.  Check date values in: |access-date= (help)
  11. ^ Harris, A. W.; Young, J. W. (October 1989). "Asteroid lightcurve observations from 1979-1981". Icarus: 314–364. Bibcode:1989Icar...81..314H. doi:10.1016/0019-1035(89)90056-0. ISSN 0019-1035. Retrieved December 2015.  Check date values in: |access-date= (help)
  12. ^ a b Behrend, Raoul. "Asteroids and comets rotation curves – (925) Alphonsina". Geneva Observatory. Retrieved December 2015.  Check date values in: |access-date= (help)
  13. ^ Hanus, J.; Durech, J.; Broz, M.; Warner, B. D.; Pilcher, F.; et al. (June 2011). "A study of asteroid pole-latitude distribution based on an extended set of shape models derived by the lightcurve inversion method". Astronomy and Astrophysics. 530: 16. arXiv:1104.4114free to read. Bibcode:2011A&A...530A.134H. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201116738. Retrieved December 2015.  Check date values in: |access-date= (help)
  14. ^ a b Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Bauer, J.; Wright, E.; et al. (August 2011). "Thermal Model Calibration for Minor Planets Observed with Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer/NEOWISE". The Astrophysical Journal. 736 (2): 9. Bibcode:2011ApJ...736..100M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/736/2/100. Retrieved December 2015.  Check date values in: |access-date= (help)
  15. ^ "925 Alphonsina (1920 GM)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved December 2015.  Check date values in: |access-date= (help)

External links[edit]