93 Leonis

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93 Leonis
Observation data
Epoch J2000      Equinox J2000
Constellation Leo
Right ascension  11h 47m 59.13595s[1]
Declination +20° 13′ 08.1500″[1]
Apparent magnitude (V) 4.522[2]
Characteristics
Spectral type G5III + A7V[3]
U−B color index +0.28[4]
B−V color index +0.9 / +0.2[3]
Variable type RS CVn[5]
Astrometry
Radial velocity (Rv)0.750 ± 0.05[6] km/s
Proper motion (μ) RA: -145.49[1] mas/yr
Dec.: -4.34[1] mas/yr
Parallax (π)14.02 ± 0.23[1] mas
Distance233 ± 4 ly
(71 ± 1 pc)
Absolute bolometric
magnitude
 (Mbol)
0.48 / 1.27[3]
Orbit[3]
Period (P)71.69 d
Semi-major axis (a)7.5 ± 0.1 mas
Eccentricity (e)0
Inclination (i)50.1 ± 0.5°
Longitude of the node (Ω)138 ± 1°
Periastron epoch (T)JD 2447642.6 ± 0.2
Argument of periastron (ω)
(secondary)
Semi-amplitude (K1)
(primary)
29.67 ± 0.29 km/s
Semi-amplitude (K2)
(secondary)
33.8 ± 2.1 km/s
Details[3]
93 Leo A
Mass2.25 ± 0.29 M
Radius9.1 ± 0.5 R
Luminosity49.4 ± 3.4 L
Temperature5100 ± 100 K
93 Leo B
Mass1.97 ± 0.15 M
Radius2.7 ± 0.2 R
Luminosity23.9 ± 1.9 L
Temperature7800 ± 200 K
Other designations
DQ Leo, BD+21° 2358, FK5 1304, HD 102509, HIP 57565, HR 4527, SAO 81998[5]
Database references
SIMBADdata

93 Leonis (93 Leo) is a binary star in the constellation Leo. Its apparent magnitude is 4.522.[2] Based on the system's parallax, 93 Leonis is located about 233 light-years (71 parsecs) away.[1]

93 Leonis is a double-lined spectroscopic binary. Two components are known to exist, because their spectral lines shift periodically, due to the Doppler effect. The two stars are a G-type red giant and an A-type main-sequence star.[3] They complete an orbit once every 71.69 days. The system is also known to be an RS Canum Venaticorum variable, due to its binarity.[5] For that reason, it has been given the variable star designation DQ Leonis.[5]

In Chinese astronomy, 93 Leonis is called 太子, Pinyin: Tàizǐ, meaning Crown Prince, because this star is marking itself and stand alone in Crown Prince asterism, Supreme Palace enclosure mansion (see : Chinese constellation).[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f van Leeuwen, F.; et al. (2007). "Validation of the new Hipparcos reduction". Astronomy and Astrophysics. 474 (2): 653–664. arXiv:0708.1752. Bibcode:2007A&A...474..653V. doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20078357.
  2. ^ a b Høg, E.; et al. (2000). "The Tycho-2 catalogue of the 2.5 million brightest stars". Astronomy and Astrophysics. 355: L27–L30. Bibcode:2000A&A...355L..27H.
  3. ^ a b c d e f Hummel, C. A.; et al. (July 1995). "Orbits of Small Angular Scale Binaries Resolved with the Mark III Interferometer". Astronomical Journal. 110: 376. Bibcode:1995AJ....110..376H. doi:10.1086/117528.
  4. ^ Mermilliod, J.-C. (1986). "Compilation of Eggen's UBV data, transformed to UBV (unpublished)". Catalogue of Eggen's UBV Data. Bibcode:1986EgUBV........0M.
  5. ^ a b c d "* 93 Leo". SIMBAD. Centre de données astronomiques de Strasbourg. Retrieved 15 July 2017.
  6. ^ Halbwachs, J.-L.; Mayor, M.; Udry, S. (2012). "Double stars with wide separations in the AGK3 - I. Components that are themselves spectroscopic binaries". Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. 422 (1): 14–24. Bibcode:2012MNRAS.422...14H. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2966.2012.20308.x.
  7. ^ Ian Ridpath's Startales - Leo the Lion