948

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Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
948 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 948
CMXLVIII
Ab urbe condita 1701
Armenian calendar 397
ԹՎ ՅՂԷ
Assyrian calendar 5698
Balinese saka calendar 869–870
Bengali calendar 355
Berber calendar 1898
Buddhist calendar 1492
Burmese calendar 310
Byzantine calendar 6456–6457
Chinese calendar 丁未(Fire Goat)
3644 or 3584
    — to —
戊申年 (Earth Monkey)
3645 or 3585
Coptic calendar 664–665
Discordian calendar 2114
Ethiopian calendar 940–941
Hebrew calendar 4708–4709
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1004–1005
 - Shaka Samvat 869–870
 - Kali Yuga 4048–4049
Holocene calendar 10948
Iranian calendar 326–327
Islamic calendar 336–337
Japanese calendar Tenryaku 2
(天暦2年)
Javanese calendar 848–849
Julian calendar 948
CMXLVIII
Korean calendar 3281
Minguo calendar 964 before ROC
民前964年
Nanakshahi calendar −520
Seleucid era 1259/1260 AG
Thai solar calendar 1490–1491
Tibetan calendar 阴火羊年
(female Fire-Goat)
1074 or 693 or −79
    — to —
阳土猴年
(male Earth-Monkey)
1075 or 694 or −78
Minamoto no Kintada (889–948)

Year 948 (CMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Events[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]

Europe[edit]

England[edit]

  • King Eadred ravages Northumbria and burns down St. Wilfrid's church at Ripon. On his way home, he sustains heavy losses at Castleford. Eadred manages to check his rivals, and the Northumbrians are forced to pay him compensation.[3]

Africa[edit]

China[edit]

By topic[edit]

Literature[edit]

Religion[edit]


Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Treadgold, Warren T. (1997), A History of the Byzantine State and Society, Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, pp. 487–489, ISBN 0-8047-2630-2 
  2. ^ Bóna, István (2000). The Hungarians and Europe in the 9th-10th centuries. Budapest: Historia - MTA Történettudományi Intézete, p. 27. ISBN 963-8312-67-X.
  3. ^ Anglo-Saxon Chronicle MS D, 948, but the Historia Regum gives 950.
  4. ^ Onwuejeogwu, M. Angulu (1981). Igbo Civilization: Nri Kingdom & Hegemony. Ethnographica. ISBN 0-905788-08-7.