950s

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Millennium: 1st millennium
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The 950s decade ran from January 1, 950, to December 31, 959.

Events[edit]

950

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]
England[edit]
Oceania[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

951[edit]

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]
China[edit]

952[edit]

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]
England[edit]
Africa[edit]

953[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]
Africa[edit]

954[edit]

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]
England[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

955[edit]

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]
England[edit]
Africa[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

956[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]

Europe[edit]

Egypt[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

957[edit]

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]
England[edit]
Japan[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

958[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]
Africa[edit]
Asia[edit]

959[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]
England[edit]
  • October 1 – King Eadwig dies after a 4-year reign. He is succeeded by his 16-year-old brother Edgar I (the Peaceful), who effectively completes the unification of England, when Northumbria submits to his rule.

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

Significant people[edit]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Treadgold, Warren T. (1997), A History of the Byzantine State and Society, Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, p. 489, ISBN 0-8047-2630-2 .
  2. ^ Bóna, István (2000). The Hungarians and Europe in the 9th-10th centuries. Budapest: Historia - MTA Történettudományi Intézete, p. 27. ISBN 963-8312-67-X.
  3. ^ Timothy Reuter (1999). The New Cambrigde Medieval History, Volume III, p. 250. ISBN 978-0-521-36447-8.
  4. ^ Timothy Reuter (1999). The New Cambrigde Medieval History, Volume III, p. 247. ISBN 978-0-521-36447-8.
  5. ^ Early Sources, p. 451. The corresponding entry in the Annals of the Four Masters, 950, states that the Northmen were the victors, which would suggest that it should be associated with Eric Bloodaxe.
  6. ^ Vasiliev, A.A. (1968). Byzance et les Arabes, Tome II, 1ére partie: Les relations politiques de Byzance et des Arabes à L'époque de la dynastie macédonienne (867–959). Brussels: Éditions de l'Institut de Philologie et d'Histoire Orientales.
  7. ^ Bóna, István (2000). The Hungarians and Europe in the 9th-10th centuries. Budapest: Historia - MTA Történettudományi Intézete, pp. 51-52. ISBN 963-8312-67-X.
  8. ^ Ballan, Mohammad (2010). Fraxinetum: An Islamic Frontier State in Tenth-Century Provence. Comitatus: A journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Volume 41, 2010, p. 31.
  9. ^ The Annals of Flodoard of Reims, 916–966, eds & trans. Steven Fanning: Bernard S. Bachrach (New York; Ontario, Can: University of Toronto Press, 2011), p. 60.
  10. ^ Timothy Reuter (1999). The New Cambrigde Medieval History, Volume III, p. 247. ISBN 978-0-521-36447-8.
  11. ^ Williams, Hywel (2005). Cassell's Chronology of World History. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson. pp. 95–104. ISBN 978-0-304-35730-7. 
  12. ^ Bóna, István (2000). The Hungarians and Europe in the 9th-10th centuries. Budapest: Historia - MTA Történettudományi Intézete, p. 54. ISBN 963-8312-67-X.
  13. ^ Timothy Reuter (1999). The New Cambrigde Medieval History, Volume III, p. 248. ISBN 978-0-521-36447-8.
  14. ^ Gilbert Meynier (2010). L'Algérie cœur du Maghreb classique. De l'ouverture islamo-arabe au repli (658-1518). Paris: La Découverte; p.28.
  15. ^ Timothy Reuter (1999). The New Cambrigde Medieval History, Volume III, p. 591. ISBN 978-0-521-36447-8.
  16. ^ Timothy Reuter (1999). The New Cambrigde Medieval History, Volume III, p. 386. ISBN 978-0-521-36447-8.
  17. ^ Herbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "St. Dunstan" Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company.
  18. ^ Herbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "St. Dunstan" Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company.
  19. ^ Shepard, Jonathan (2010). The Oxford Encyclopedia of Medieval Warfare and Military Technology, Volume 3, pp.151–152. Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-533403-6.
  20. ^ Gilbert Meynier (2010) L'Algérie cœur du Maghreb classique. De l'ouverture islamo-arabe au repli (658-1518). Paris: La Découverte; p. 42.
  21. ^ Bóna, Istvá (2000). The Hungarians and Europe in the 9th-10th centuries. Budapest: Historia - MTA Történettudományi Intézete, p. 33. ISBN 963-8312-67-X.