95th Evacuation Hospital

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The 95th Evacuation Hospital was a U.S military hospital during World War II, the Vietnam War, and the Gulf War.

Background[edit]

The 95th Evacuation Hospital originally constituted as the 74th Surgical Hospital 21 December 1928.[1] It was activated at Fort Warren, Cheyenne, Wyoming, 1 June 1941. The hospital was then reorganized and re-designated as the 95th Evacuation Hospital 14 August 1942. It was deactivated at Camp Kilmer, New Jersey, 3 December 1954.[1]

The 95th Evacuation Hospital was again activated on 26 March 1963 and deactivated in Vietnam 28 March 1973.[1]

The 95th Evacuation Hospital was activated in Heidelberg, Germany for operation during the Gulf War 15 November 1994.[1]

Service in World War II[edit]

During World War II the 95th Evacuation Hospital operated as a 400-bed mobile hospital. The unit was staffed with approximately 40 doctors, 40 nurses, and 220 enlisted men.[2]

The hospital was in operation in Morocco, Algiers, and Italy where it was assigned to the U.S. Fifth Army. While in operation in France and Germany, the hospital was assigned to the U.S. Seventh Army.

When the 95th Evacuation Hospital landed in Italy 9 September 1943, it was the first U.S. hospital established on the European continent in World War II.[3] In addition to Salerno, the hospital made two other amphibious landings (Anzio and Southern France).

The 95th Evacuation Hospital achieved national recognition at Anzio.[citation needed] On 7 February 1944, German plane dropped a load of fragmentation bombs on the hospital in an effort to evade two British planes.[4] Twenty-eight people were killed and 60 wounded. Among the dead were two officers, three nurses, 16 enlisted men, a Red Cross worker, and two other personnel.[5] The bombing rendered the hospital nonfunctional with damage so great, the 95th was sent to the then-static Cassino front where it was re-staffed and re-equipped.[4]

Timeline[edit]

  • August 14, 1942 – Fort Warren, Wyoming, 74th Surgical Hospital re-designated 95th Evacuation Hospital[1]
  • September 19, 1942 – Camp Breckinridge, Morganfield, Kentucky[citation needed]
  • April 2, 1943 – Camp Shanks, Orangeburg, New York[6]
  • April 15, 1943 – Departed New York Harbor for North Africa aboard the USS Mariposa[7]
  • April 24, 1943 – Casablanca, Morocco[8]
  • May 24, 1943 – Oujda, Morocco[9]
  • July 7, 1943 – Unit commendation[10]
  • July 8, 1943 – Ain el Turck, Algeria in support of Operation Husky (Sicily)[11]
  • September 5, 1943 – Departed Oran, Algeria, aboard the Dutch ship Marnix[12]
  • September 9, 1943 – Landed Paestum, Italy, Operation Avalanche, D-day +H-11[13]
  • October 9, 1943 – Naples, Italy[13]
  • November 28, 1943 – Capua, Italy[14]
  • January 8, 1944 – Departed Capua for Caserta, in preparation for Operation Shingle[15]
  • January 17, 1944 – Unit commendation[16]
  • January 23, 1944 – Boarded LST #163, for Anzio, Italy, Green Beach, D-day +1[17]
  • January 31, 1944 – Nettuno, Italy[4]
  • February 7, 1944 – Bombing killed 26, wounded 60, rendered hospital nonfunctional[4]
  • February 11, 1944 – Riardo (Cassino), Italy[4]
  • March 13, 1944 – Carinola, Italy[18]
  • April 10, 1944 – Unit commendation[19]
  • May 23, 1944 – Itri, Italy[20]
  • June 1, 1944 – Cori (Cisterna), Italy[21]
  • June 13, 1944 – Montalto di Castro, Italy[22]
  • July 16–18, 1944 – Sparanise, Italy, Operation Dragoon[22]
  • August 12, 1944 – Departed Pozzuoli, Italy, aboard 2 LCIs (#188 and an unknown)[23][24]
  • August 14, 1944 – Ajaccio, Corsica[25]
  • August 15, 1944 – Cavalaire, France, D-Day H-8[23]
  • August 17, 1944 – Cogolin, France, not in operation[26]
  • August 18, 1944 – Gonfaron, France[23]
  • August 28–31, 1944 – Closed, awaiting movement orders and transportation[27]
  • September 3, 1944 – Beaumont (Beaumont-de-Aspre)[28]
  • September 5, 1944 – St. Amour, France[28]
  • September 20, 1944 – Saulx, France[29]
  • October 9, 1944 – Epinal (Renauvoid), France[30]
  • November 1944 – Epinal (Golbey), France[31]
  • December 6, 1944 – Mutzig, France[32]
  • January 3, 1945 – Epinal (Golbey), France[33]
  • January 3, 1945 – Mutzig, France[33]
  • January 8, 1945 – Departed for Sarrebourg, France[33]
  • March 29, 1945 – Bensheim, Germany[34]
  • April 8, 1945 – Kist, Germany[35]
  • April 29, 1945 – Ebermergen, Germany[35]
  • Late May–June (possibly after May 21) – Bretton, Germany[citation needed]

Personnel[edit]

Commanding Officers: Col. Paul K. Sauer, Lt. Col. Hubert L. Binkley (commander after Sauer was wounded in the 7 February bombing.) Chief of Surgical Service Lt. Col. Grantley W. Taylor, Chief of Medical Service Col. William Comess, Laboratory and Pharmacy Officer Capt. Harry J. Schneider, X-ray Officer Capt. Mario C. Gian, Chief of Dental Services Major Lewis A Imerman, Chief Anesthetist Capt. Marshall A. Bauer, Principal Chief Nurse Capt. Evelyn E. Swanson.[36]

Battles and campaigns[edit]

Decorations[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e ArmyPharmacy.
  2. ^ Monahan 2003, p. 30.
  3. ^ Wiltse, p. 231.
  4. ^ a b c d e USArmy 1944g, p. 3.
  5. ^ USArmy 1944g, Bombing raid report.
  6. ^ Monahan 2003, p. 133.
  7. ^ Friedenberg 2004, p. 10.
  8. ^ Friedenberg 2004, p. 12.
  9. ^ Friedenberg 2004, p. 18.
  10. ^ Friedenberg 2004, p. 143.
  11. ^ Friedenberg 2004, p. 30.
  12. ^ Friedenberg 2004, p. 34.
  13. ^ a b Friedenberg 2004, pp. 37–38.
  14. ^ Wiltse, p. 241.
  15. ^ Friedenberg 2004, p. 76.
  16. ^ Friedenberg 2004, p. 145.
  17. ^ Friedenberg 2004, p. 78.
  18. ^ USArmy 1944g, p. 4.
  19. ^ Friedenberg 2004, p. 146.
  20. ^ USArmy 1944g, p. 5.
  21. ^ Wiltse, p. 303.
  22. ^ a b USArmy 1944g, p. 8.
  23. ^ a b c USArmy 1944g, p. 9.
  24. ^ Friedenberg 2004, p. 104.
  25. ^ Friedenberg 2004, pp. 104–5.
  26. ^ Wiltse, pp. 378–9.
  27. ^ USArmy 1944b.
  28. ^ a b USArmy 1944g, p. 10.
  29. ^ USArmy 1944c.
  30. ^ USArmy 1944d.
  31. ^ USArmy 1944e.
  32. ^ USArmy 1944f.
  33. ^ a b c USArmy 1944a.
  34. ^ USArmy 1945a.
  35. ^ a b USArmy 1945b.
  36. ^ USArmy 1944g.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Monahan, Evelyn (2003). And If I Perish. New York: Random House. 
  • Wiltse, Charles M. The Medical Department: Medical Services in the Mediterranean and Minor Theaters. Office of Medical History, U.S. Army Medical Department. 
  • Friedenberg, Zachary (2004). Hospital At War. Texas A&M Univ. Press. 
  • 95th Evacuation Hospital 1944 January Monthly report, NARA RG407. US Army. 1944. 
  • 95th Evacuation Hospital 1944 August Monthly Report, NARA RG407. US Army. 1944. 
  • 95th Evacuation Hospital 1944 September Monthly report, NARA RG407. US Army. 1944. 
  • 95th Evacuation Hospital 1944 October Monthly report, NARA RG407. US Army. 1944. 
  • 95th Evacuation Hospital 1944 November Monthly report, NARA RG407. US Army. 1944. 
  • 95th Evacuation Hospital 1944 December Monthly Report, NARA RG407. US Army. 1944. 
  • 95th Evacuation Hospital 1944 Annual Report, NARA RG407. US Army. 1944. 
  • 95th Evacuation Hospital 1945 March Monthly report, NARA RG407. US Army. 1945. 
  • 95th Evacuation Hospital 1945 April Monthly report, NARA RG407. US Army. 1945. 
  • Anon. "Army Pharmacy". Archived from the original on June 17, 2002. Retrieved 1 June 2011.