961

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Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
961 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar961
CMLXI
Ab urbe condita1714
Armenian calendar410
ԹՎ ՆԺ
Assyrian calendar5711
Balinese saka calendar882–883
Bengali calendar368
Berber calendar1911
Buddhist calendar1505
Burmese calendar323
Byzantine calendar6469–6470
Chinese calendar庚申(Metal Monkey)
3657 or 3597
    — to —
辛酉年 (Metal Rooster)
3658 or 3598
Coptic calendar677–678
Discordian calendar2127
Ethiopian calendar953–954
Hebrew calendar4721–4722
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat1017–1018
 - Shaka Samvat882–883
 - Kali Yuga4061–4062
Holocene calendar10961
Iranian calendar339–340
Islamic calendar349–350
Japanese calendarTentoku 5 / Ōwa 1
(応和元年)
Javanese calendar861–862
Julian calendar961
CMLXI
Korean calendar3294
Minguo calendar951 before ROC
民前951年
Nanakshahi calendar−507
Seleucid era1272/1273 AG
Thai solar calendar1503–1504
Tibetan calendar阳金猴年
(male Iron-Monkey)
1087 or 706 or −66
    — to —
阴金鸡年
(female Iron-Rooster)
1088 or 707 or −65
Statue of Caliph Al-Hakam II (915–976)

Year 961 (CMLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Events[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]

Europe[edit]

Armenia[edit]

  • King Ashot III (the Merciful) moves his capital from Kars eastward to Ani (modern Turkey). Located on a major east-west caravan route, Ani will become larger than any Europan city, with a population of about 100,000 that will rival Baghdad, Cairo, and Constantinople. Ani also becomes the site of the royal mausoleum of the Bagratuni kings.[2]

By topic[edit]

Art[edit]

Religion[edit]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Romane, Julian (2015). Byzantine Triumphant. Pen and Sword Books, p. 6. ISBN 978-1473845701.
  2. ^ Manuk-Khaloyan, Armen (2013). "In the Cemetery of their Ancestors: The Royal Burial Tombs of the Bagratuni Kings of Greater Armenia (890–1073/79)". Revue des Études Arméniennes: pp. 147–155.
  3. ^ Chisholm, Hugh (1911). "Tavistock". Encyclopædia Britannica (Eleventh Edition). Cambridge University Press, pp. 457–458.