96 Aegle

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96 Aegle
Discovery
Discovered by Jérôme Eugène Coggia
Discovery date February 17, 1868
Designations
Named after
Aegle
 
Main belt
Orbital characteristics
Epoch December 31, 2006 (JD 2454100.5)
Aphelion 517.649 Gm (3.460 AU)
Perihelion 397.127 Gm (2.655 AU)
457.388 Gm (3.057 AU)
Eccentricity 0.132
1952.711 d (5.35 a)
16.96 km/s
354.814°
Inclination 15.938°
321.809°
206.967°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 167.92 ± 5.49 km[1]
Mass (6.48 ± 6.26) × 1018 kg[1]
Mean density
2.61 ± 2.53[1] g/cm3
0.0475 m/s²
0.0898 km/s
13.82 h[2]
Albedo 0.052 [3]
Temperature ~159 K
Spectral type
T[2][4]
7.67

96 Aegle (/ˈɡl/ EE-glee) is a very large main-belt asteroid. It has a dark-colored surface and probably a primitive carbonaceous composition. It was discovered by Jérôme Coggia on February 17, 1868, and named after one of the three Aegles in Greek mythology.[5] Aegle has been observed occulting seven stars (on 18 Feb 2002, 10 Aug 2002, 3 Aug 2003, 8 Sep 2009, 5 Jan 2010, 29 Oct 2010, and 7 Sep 2013).[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Carry, B. (December 2012), "Density of asteroids", Planetary and Space Science, 73, pp. 98–118, arXiv:1203.4336free to read, Bibcode:2012P&SS...73...98C, doi:10.1016/j.pss.2012.03.009.  See Table 1.
  2. ^ a b *JPL Small-Body Database Browser
  3. ^ Asteroid Data Sets
  4. ^ DeMeo, Francesca E.; et al. (2011), "An extension of the Bus asteroid taxonomy into the near-infrared" (PDF), Icarus, 202 (1): 160–180, Bibcode:2009Icar..202..160D, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2009.02.005, retrieved 22 March 2013.  See appendix A.
  5. ^ Schmadel, Lutz D. (1997). "Dictionary of Minor Planet Names". Germany: Springer. p. 33. ISBN 978-3-662-06617-1. Retrieved 24 January 2016. 
  6. ^ Watanabe, Hayato (3 January 2016), The Index of Asteroidal Occultation Results, Worldwide (ver. 2), retrieved 23 January 2016 

External links[edit]