971

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
971 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 971
CMLXXI
Ab urbe condita 1724
Armenian calendar 420
ԹՎ ՆԻ
Assyrian calendar 5721
Balinese saka calendar 892–893
Bengali calendar 378
Berber calendar 1921
Buddhist calendar 1515
Burmese calendar 333
Byzantine calendar 6479–6480
Chinese calendar 庚午(Metal Horse)
3667 or 3607
    — to —
辛未年 (Metal Goat)
3668 or 3608
Coptic calendar 687–688
Discordian calendar 2137
Ethiopian calendar 963–964
Hebrew calendar 4731–4732
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1027–1028
 - Shaka Samvat 892–893
 - Kali Yuga 4071–4072
Holocene calendar 10971
Iranian calendar 349–350
Islamic calendar 360–361
Japanese calendar Tenroku 2
(天禄2年)
Javanese calendar 872–873
Julian calendar 971
CMLXXI
Korean calendar 3304
Minguo calendar 941 before ROC
民前941年
Nanakshahi calendar −497
Seleucid era 1282/1283 AG
Thai solar calendar 1513–1514
Tibetan calendar 阳金马年
(male Iron-Horse)
1097 or 716 or −56
    — to —
阴金羊年
(female Iron-Goat)
1098 or 717 or −55
Emperor John I (middle) returns in triumph in Constantinople with the captured Boris II.

Year 971 (CMLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Events[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]

Europe[edit]

  • Emperor Otto I (the Great) appoints his imperial secretary Willigis as chancellor (guardian of the emperor's seal). An office formerly held by Otto's brother, Archbishop Bruno I.

England[edit]

Africa[edit]

China[edit]

  • January 23 – A war elephant corps of the Southern Han is defeated at Shao, by crossbow fire from Song Dynasty troops. The Southern Han Kingdom is forced to submit to the Song Dynasty. Ending Southern Han rule, but also the first regular war elephant corps employed in a Chinese army, that had gained the Southern Han victories throughout the 10th century.

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

  • The grave of Swithun, Anglo-Saxon bishop of Winchester, is moved into an indoor shrine (he was previously buried outside) in the Old Minster. The ceremony is said to have been marred by 40 days of torrential rain.

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Treadgold, Warren (1997). A History of the Byzantine State and Society, p. 509. Stanford University Press. ISBN 0-8047-2630-2.
  2. ^ John V.A. Fine, Jr. (1991). The Early Medieval Balkans: A Critical Survey from the Sixth to the Late Twelfth Century, pp. 186–187. ISBN 978-0472-08149-3.