980s

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Millennium: 1st millennium
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The 980s decade ran from January 1, 980, to December 31, 989.

Events[edit]

980

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]
England[edit]
Arabian Empire[edit]
Africa[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

981[edit]

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]
Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Exploration[edit]
Religion[edit]
Commerce[edit]

982[edit]

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]
  • Summer – Emperor Otto II (the Red) assembles an imperial expeditionary force at Taranto and proceeds along the gulf coast towards Calabria. In the meantime, Abu'l-Qasim (Kalbid emir of the Emirate of Sicily), declares a Holy War (jihad) against the Germans, but retreats his forces when he notice the unexpected strength of Otto's troops (not far from Rossano).
  • July 13 (or 14) – Battle of Stilo: Abu'l-Qasim is cornered by the imperial German forces led by Otto II at Cape Colonna (south of Crotone). After a violent clash, the German heavy cavalry destroys the Muslim centre, killing al-Qasim in the initial fighting. The Saracens hold together, draws Otto into a trap, encircling and defeating his forces (killing around 4,000 men).[3]
  • King Harald Bluetooth invades Norway, pillaging south-west Norway all the way to Stad, where he encounters Haakon Sigurdsson (the de facto ruler of Norway) and his army. He flees back to Denmark, ending the invasion.
Arabian Empire[edit]
China[edit]

By topic[edit]

Exploration[edit]
Religion[edit]

983[edit]

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]
Arabian Empire[edit]
China[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]

984[edit]

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]
Japan[edit]
  • Fall – Emperor En'yū abdicates the throne in favor of his 16-year-old son Kazan after a 15-year reign. En'yū retires and becomes a Buddhist priest.

By topic[edit]

Technology[edit]
Religion[edit]

985[edit]

By place[edit]

Europe[edit]
England[edit]
Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Exploration[edit]
Religion[edit]

986[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]
Arabian Empire[edit]
Asia[edit]

By topic[edit]

Exploration[edit]
Literature[edit]

987[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]
Africa[edit]

By topic[edit]

Art[edit]

988[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]
China[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]
Economy[edit]

989[edit]

By place[edit]

Byzantine Empire[edit]
Europe[edit]

By topic[edit]

Religion[edit]
Art[edit]
Education[edit]
Astronomy[edit]

Significant people[edit]

Births[edit]

Deaths[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Reuter, Timothy (1999). The New Cambridge Medieval History, Volume III, p. 254. ISBN 978-0-521-36447-8.
  2. ^ James Hastings (2003). Encyclopedia of Religion and Ethics - Part 24, p. 847 (Kessinger Publishing).
  3. ^ Reuter, Timothy (1999). The New Cambridge Medieval History, Volume III, p. 255. ISBN 978-0-521-36447-8.
  4. ^ "Islamic Culture and the Medical Arts_Hospitals". Retrieved 8 November 2011.
  5. ^ Reuter, Timothy (1999). The New Cambridge Medieval History, Volume III, p. 256. ISBN 978-0-521-36447-8.
  6. ^ Eleanor Shipley Duckett, Death and life in the Tenth Century, (University of Michigan Press, 1967), p. 110.
  7. ^ Reuter, Timothy (1999). The New Cambridge Medieval History, Volume III, p. 256. ISBN 978-0-521-36447-8.
  8. ^ Boissonade, B. (1934). "Les premières croisades françaises en Espagne. Normands, Gascons, Aquitains et Bourguignons (1018-1032)". Bulletin Hispanique. 36 (1): 5–28. doi:10.3406/hispa.1934.2607.
  9. ^ "Lady Wulfruna c. 935-1005, Founder of the City". Wolverhampton City Council. Retrieved 27 March 2013.
  10. ^ Zlatarski, History of the Bulgarian state, v. I, ch. 2, pp. 674–675.
  11. ^ Raffaele D'Amato (2010). Osprey: MAA - 459: The Varangian Guard 988–1453, p. 6. ISBN 978-1-84908-179-5.
  12. ^ Picard, Christophe (2000). Le Portugal musulman (VIIIe-XIIIe siècle). L'Occident d'al-Andalus sous domination islamique. Paris: Maisonneuve & Larose. p. 109. ISBN 2-7068-1398-9.
  13. ^ Robert Fawtier, The Capetian Kings of France, transl. Lionel Butler and R.J. Adam, (Macmillan, 1989), p.48.
  14. ^ France, John (1991). "The occasion of the coming of the Normans to southern Italy". Journal of Medieval History. 17 (1): 183–203. doi:10.1016/0304-4181(91)90033-H.
  15. ^ Gilbert Meynier (2010). L'Algérie cœur du Maghreb classique. De l'ouverture islamo-arabe au repli (658-1518). Paris: La Découverte; p. 45.
  16. ^ "Odense Bys Historie" (in Danish). Odense Bys Museer. Retrieved 27 June 2014.
  17. ^ Reuter, Timothy (1999). The New Cambridge Medieval History, Volume III, p. 390. ISBN 978-0-521-36447-8.
  18. ^ Maranci, Christina (September 2003). "The Architect Trdat: Building Practices and Cross-Cultural Exchange in Byzantium and Armenia". Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians. 62 (3): 294–305. JSTOR 3592516.