98 Ianthe

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98 Ianthe
A657.M1088.shape.png
Three-dimensional model of 98 Ianthe created based on light-curve.
Discovery
Discovered by Christian Heinrich Friedrich Peters
Discovery date 18 April 1868
Designations
Named after
Ianthe
 
Main belt
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 145.23 yr (53047 d)
Aphelion 3.18807 AU (476.928 Gm)
Perihelion 2.18872 AU (327.428 Gm)
2.68839 AU (402.177 Gm)
Eccentricity 0.18586
4.41 yr (1610.0 d)
18.01 km/s
262.019°
0° 13m 24.949s / day
Inclination 15.5778°
354.000°
158.686°
Earth MOID 1.20327 AU (180.007 Gm)
Jupiter MOID 1.81554 AU (271.601 Gm)
Jupiter Tisserand parameter 3.296
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 104.45±1.8 km[1]
106.16 ± 3.76 km[2]
Mass (8.93 ± 1.99) × 1017 kg[2]
Mean density
1.42 ± 0.35 g/cm3[2]
Equatorial surface gravity
0.0292 m/s²
Equatorial escape velocity
0.0552 km/s
16.479 h (0.6866 d)[1][3]
0.0471±0.002[1]
0.047 [4]
Temperature ~170 K
C
8.84

98 Ianthe (/ˈænθ/ eye-AN-thee) is a large main-belt asteroid, named for three figures in Greek mythology. It is very dark and is composed of carbonates. It was one of the numerous (for his time—the 19th century) discoveries by C. H. F. Peters, who found it on April 18, 1868, from Clinton, New York.

Photometric observations of this asteroid during 2007 at the Organ Mesa Observatory in Las Cruces, New Mexico were used to create a light curve plot. This showed a synodic rotation period of 16.479 ± 0.001 hours and a brightness variation of 0.27 ± 0.02 magnitude during each cycle.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "98 Ianthe". JPL Small-Body Database. NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 12 May 2016. 
  2. ^ a b c Carry, B. (December 2012), "Density of asteroids", Planetary and Space Science 73, pp. 98–118, arXiv:1203.4336, Bibcode:2012P&SS...73...98C, doi:10.1016/j.pss.2012.03.009.  See Table 1.
  3. ^ a b Pilcher, Frederick (June 2008), "Period Determination for 84 Klio, 98 Ianthe, 102 Miriam 112 Iphigenia, 131 Vala, and 650 Amalasuntha", The Minor Planet Bulletin 35 (2), pp. 71–72, Bibcode:2008MPBu...35...71P, doi:10.1016/j.pss.2012.03.009. 
  4. ^ Asteroid Data Sets

External links[edit]