99906 Uofalberta

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99906 Uofalberta
Discovery [1]
Discovered by A. Lowe
Discovery site Palomar Obs.
Discovery date 17 August 2002
Designations
MPC designation (99906) Uofalberta
Named after
University of Alberta [2]
2002 QV53
main-belt · (outer)[1]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 16 February 2017 (JD 2457800.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc 19.35 yr (7,069 days)
Aphelion 3.4986 AU
Perihelion 2.9290 AU
3.2138 AU
Eccentricity 0.0886
5.76 yr (2,104 days)
148.47°
0° 10m 15.96s / day
Inclination 11.696°
161.48°
216.45°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions 6.834±0.303 km[3]
0.055±0.015[3]
14.9[1]

99906 Uofalberta, provisional designation 2002 QV53, is a dark asteroid from the outermost region of the asteroid belt, approximately 7 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered by Canadian amateur astronomer Andrew Lowe on 17 August 2002, from digitized photographic plates taken at the Palomar Observatory.[4]

Naming[edit]

This minor planet was named after the University of Alberta; the initials of its motto Quaecumque Vera ("Whatsoever things are true") appear in the provisional designation. The official naming citation was published on 18 September 2005 (M.P.C. 54830).[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 99906 Uofalberta (2002 QV53)" (2017-03-31 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 28 April 2017. 
  2. ^ Schmadel, Lutz D. (2006). Dictionary of Minor Planet Names – (99906) Uofalberta, Addendum to Fifth Edition: 2003–2005. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. pp. 238–239. ISBN 978-3-540-34361-5. Retrieved 28 April 2017. 
  3. ^ a b Masiero, Joseph R.; Mainzer, A. K.; Grav, T.; Bauer, J. M.; Cutri, R. M.; Dailey, J.; et al. (November 2011). "Main Belt Asteroids with WISE/NEOWISE. I. Preliminary Albedos and Diameters". The Astrophysical Journal. 741 (2): 20. Bibcode:2011ApJ...741...68M. arXiv:1109.4096Freely accessible. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/741/2/68. Retrieved 28 April 2017. 
  4. ^ "99906 Uofalberta (2002 QV53)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 28 April 2017. 
  5. ^ "MPC/MPO/MPS Archive". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 28 April 2017. 

External links[edit]