A.J. Drexel Plasma Institute

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A.J. Drexel Plasma Institute
Established 2002
Field of research
Plasma Technology
Director Alexander Fridman, Ph.D.
Faculty 23
Students 39
Alumni 34
Location Camden, New Jersey, U.S.
Website www.plasmainstitute.org

The Drexel Plasma Institute, in Camden, New Jersey, is the largest university-based plasma research facility in the United States of America. Led by Drexel University, the members of the scientific team are from University of Illinois at Chicago, Argonne National Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Kurchatov Institute of Atomic Energy. The primary fields of research are applications in medicine, Environmental Control, energy, and agricultural industries. DPI exists to research, educate, and design plasma systems. More specifically, its mission is

"to stimulate and coordinate research projects related to plasma and other modern high energy engineering techniques."[1]

The institute actively develops and researches specific types of plasma discharges such as gliding arc, dielectric barrier discharge, gliding arc tornado, reverse vortex flow, Pulsed Corona Discharge, and many more.

Applications[edit]

Many applications of plasma can be utilized in many industries. As such, its application is often categorized in the context of its research. For example, the dissociation of hydrogen sulfide can be labeled as an environmental application. However, its production of gaseous hydrogen can be more relevant to the energy industry. As such, it is categorized on its researched application, rather than its objective goal.

Medicine[edit]

Dr. Gregory Fridman is the laboratory director regarding the application of plasma in the field of medicine. Along with teaching at Drexel University, he creates and finds new applications of plasma in medicine such as blood coagulation.[2]

Environmental control[edit]

Energy[edit]

Alexander Rabinovich is the laboratory director regarding the application of plasma in the field of energy. Primarily, he studies and researches how plasma can be used in the Energy Systems, Fuel Conversion & Hydrogen Production Division. Some of his research is specialized in conversion of certain gases or the dissociation of others:

  • "Gliding Arc Plasma-Stimulated Conversion of Pyrogas into Synthesis Gas"[3]
  • "Low-Temperature Plasma Reforming of Hydrocarbon Fuels Into Hydrogen and Carbon Suboxide for Energy Generation Without CO2 Emission"[4]
  • "Plasma assisted dissociation of hydrogen sulfide"[5]

Agriculture[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Fridman, Alexander. "Mission". Drexel Plasma Institute. Retrieved 30 May 2014. 
  2. ^ Kalghatgi, S.U.; Fridman, G.; Cooper, M.; Nagaraj, G.; Peddinghaus, M.; Balasubramanian, M.; Vasilets, V.N.; Gutsol, A.F.; Fridman, A.; Friedman, G. (Oct 2007). "Mechanism of Blood Coagulation by Nonthermal Atmospheric Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma". Plasma Science, IEEE Transactions on (IEEE) 35 (5): 1559–1566. doi:10.1109/tps.2007.905953. ISSN 0093-3813. Retrieved 30 May 2014. 
  3. ^ Odeyemi, F.; Rabinovich, A.; Fridman, A., (9 April 2012). "Gliding Arc Plasma-Stimulated Conversion of Pyrogas into Synthesis Gas". Plasma Science, IEEE Transactions on (IEEE) 40 (4): 1124–1130. doi:10.1109/tps.2012.2185855. ISSN 0093-3813. 
  4. ^ Odeyemi, F.; Pekker, M.; Rabinovich, A.; Fridman, A.A.; Min Heon; Mochalin, V.N.; Gogotsi, Yury, (April 2012). "Low Temperature Plasma Reforming of Hydrocarbon Fuels Into Hydrogen and Carbon Suboxide for Energy Generation Without CO2 Emission". Plasma Science, IEEE Transactions on (IEEE) 40 (4): 1124–1130. ISSN 0093-3813. Retrieved 30 May 2014. 
  5. ^ T. Nunnally; K. Gutsol; A. Fridman; A. Starikovskiy; A. Gutsol; A. Kemounc (17 November 2011). "Plasma assisted dissociation of hydrogen sulfide". International Journal of Hydrogen Energy (Elsevier Ltd.) 37 (2): 1335–1347. doi:10.1016/j.ijhydene.2011.10.048. Retrieved 30 May 2014.